The female thermometer : eighteenth-century culture and the invention of the uncanny / Terry Castle.

By: Castle, TerryContributor(s): Mazal Holocaust CollectionMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Ideologies of desire: Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1995Description: 278 pages : illustrations ; 25 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0195080971; 9780195080971Subject(s): English literature -- 18th century -- History and criticism | Gothic revival (Literature) -- Great Britain | Women and literature -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Romanticism -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Invention (Rhetoric) -- History -- 18th century | Sex (Psychology) in literature | Supernatural in literature | Femininity in literature | English literature | Femininity in literature | Gothic revival (Literature) | Invention (Rhetoric) | Romanticism | Sex (Psychology) in literature | Supernatural in literature | Women and literature | Great Britain | Engels | Het Bovennatuurlijke | Letterkunde | Vrouwen | Gothic Revival (letterkunde) | Das Unheimliche | Englisch | Erotik Motiv | Frau Motiv | Frau | Literatur | Schauerroman | Sexualität | Weiblichkeit Motiv | Surnaturel -- dans la littérature anglaise | Femmes et littérature -- Angleterre (GB) -- 18e siècle | Féminité (psychologie) dans la littérature | Femmes -- Dans la littérature | Littérature anglaise -- 18e siècle -- Histoire et critique | Roman gothique -- Grande-Bretagne | Romantisme -- Grande-Bretagne | Sexualite (psychologie) dans la littérature | Merveilleux (littérature) | Kultur | Frau | Leidenschaft | Literature -- English -- history | 1700-1799 | English literature Special subjects Paranormal phenomena History, 1702-1800Genre/Form: Aufsatzsammlung. | Criticism, interpretation, etc. | History.DDC classification: 820.9/37 | 305.420903 LOC classification: PR448.G6 | C37 1995Other classification: 18.05 | HG 674 | HK 1091
Contents:
"Amy who knew my Disease": A psychosexual pattern in Defoe's Roxana -- Lovelace's Dream -- "Matters not fit to be mentioned": Fielding's The Female Husband -- The Culture of Travesty: Sexuality and masquerade in Eighteenth-Century England -- The Carnivalization of Eighteenth-Century English Narrative -- The Spectralization of the Other in The Mysteries of Udolpho -- Phantasmagoria and Metaphorics of Modern Reverie -- Spectral politics: Apparition belief and the romantic imagination -- Contagious Folly: An Adventure and its skeptics.
Summary: The female thermometer is a collection of Professor Castle's liveliest essays on female identity from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century. Throughout the book are woven the themes which are constant in Castle's work: fantasy, hallucination, travesty, transgression, women, and sexual ambiguity. These essays form a coherent and provocative exploration of a range of issues pertinent to gender studies.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR448.G6 C37 1995 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002322998

Includes bibliographical references (pages 253-268) and index.

The female thermometer is a collection of Professor Castle's liveliest essays on female identity from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century. Throughout the book are woven the themes which are constant in Castle's work: fantasy, hallucination, travesty, transgression, women, and sexual ambiguity. These essays form a coherent and provocative exploration of a range of issues pertinent to gender studies.

"Amy who knew my Disease": A psychosexual pattern in Defoe's Roxana -- Lovelace's Dream -- "Matters not fit to be mentioned": Fielding's The Female Husband -- The Culture of Travesty: Sexuality and masquerade in Eighteenth-Century England -- The Carnivalization of Eighteenth-Century English Narrative -- The Spectralization of the Other in The Mysteries of Udolpho -- Phantasmagoria and Metaphorics of Modern Reverie -- Spectral politics: Apparition belief and the romantic imagination -- Contagious Folly: An Adventure and its skeptics.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Terry Castle Professor of English at Stanford University

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