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A history of their own : women in Europe from prehistory to the present / Bonnie S. Anderson, Judith P. Zinsser.

By: Anderson, Bonnie S.
Contributor(s): Zinsser, Judith P.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Perennial Library, 1989Edition: 1st Perennial Library ed.Description: 2 volumes : illustrations ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeSubject(s): Women -- Europe -- History | Feminism -- Europe -- History | Feminism | Women | Europe | VrouwenGenre/Form: History.DDC classification: 940.1 Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
VOLUME I -- I. TRADITIONS INHERITED: ATTITUDES ABOUT WOMEN FROM THE CENTURIES BEFORE 800 A.D. -- 1. Buried Traditions: The Question of Origins: Archaeological, biological, psychological, anthropological, written evidence -- 2. Inherited Traditions: The Principal Influences -- 3. Traditions Subordinating Women: Women's approved roles, dishonorable roles (slave, prostitute, concubine), misogyny -- 4. Traditions Empowering Women: Worship of goddesses, women warriors, women in power (queens and empresses), women of wealth, educated and artistic women -- 5. The Effects of Christianity: Beliefs and practices empowering/subordinating women -- II. WOMEN OF THE FIELDS: SUSTAINING THE GENERATIONS -- 1. The Constants of the Peasant Women's World: The Ninth to the Twentieth Centuries: The life, the landscape, the year's activities, children and nurturing, treats to survival -- 2. Sustaining the Generations: The family and marriage, access to the land, additional income, impossible choices, survival outside the family, giving value -- 3. The Extraordinary: Joan of Arc, the witchcraft persecutions -- 4. What Remains of the Peasant Woman's World -- III. WOMEN OF THE CHURCHES: THE POWER OF THE FAITHFUL -- 1. The Patterns of Power and Limitation: The Tenth to the Seventeenth Centuries: -- 2. Authority Within the Institutional Church: The great abbesses and learned holy communities, reformed religious orders (twelfth and thirteenth centuries), the cloistered life of the nun, mystics (the ecstatic life).
3. Authority Outside the Institutional Church: Challenges to established dogma and established orders, the Virgin Mary, exemplars, tertiaries and beguines, heresy (the limits of power through faith) -- 4. Authority Given and Taken Away: The Protestant and Catholic Reformations: Religious enthusiasm reborn (sixteenth and seventeenth centuries), queens, princesses and noblewomen, protesters, proselytizers unorthodox nuns and martyrs, limiting roles (the woman's proper place) -- 5. Traditional Images Redrawn: The female nature, the Christian family -- 6. The Legacy of the Protestant Reformation -- IV. WOMEN OF THE CASTLES AND MANORS: CUSTODIANS OF LAND AND LINEAGE -- 1. From Warrior's Life to Noblewomen: The Ninth to the Seventeenth Centuries -- 2. Constants of the Noblewoman's Life: War, marriage, land, faith and children -- 3. Power and Vulnerability: Wives and daughters in the world of feudalism (ninth to twelfth centuries), courtly love and codes of chivalry, wives and daughters in the world of centralized monarchies (thirteenth to seventeenth centuries), widows and mothers (ninth to seventeenth centuries) -- 4. The New Flowering of Ancient Traditions: In literature, in law and practice, the ideal woman -- V. WOMEN OF THE WALLED TOWNS: PROVIDERS AND PARTNERS -- 1. The Townswoman's Daily Life: The Twelfth to the Seventeenth Centuries: Alleyways, streets and squares, the poor, guildswomen, merchants' wives -- 2. Dangers and Remedies: Natural disasters and war, disease and childbearing, faith in God, repentance and the saints, prayers to the Virgin Mary.
3. The World of Commercial Capitalism: The Thirteenth to Seventeenth Centuries: Protected and provided for, the business of marriage and charity, old crafts, new professions (art and medicine), capitalist entrepreneurs -- 4. The Invisible and Visible Bonds of Misogyny: Old tales retold, sumptuary and adultery laws, abuse of women (violence and ridicule), the ideal marriage and the perfect wife -- VOLUME II -- VI. WOMEN OF THE COURTS: RULERS, PATRONS AND ATTENDANTS -- 1. The world of absolute monarchs from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries -- 2. The life of the courtier: The courtier's roles and rewards, the court setting, costumes and activities -- 3. The traditional life in a grand setting: wife and queen consort: The ideal, education, marriage arrangements, childbearing, the relationship between wives and husbands -- 4. Women rulers: The combination of circumstances, queen mother and regent, royal heir and monarch -- 5. New opportunities: performers and composers, painters, courtesans, writers -- 6. Legacies of renaissance humanism and the scientific revolution: Renewed access to learning, The querelles des femmes 9thedebate over women), science affirms tradition -- VII. WOMEN OF THE SALONS AND PARLORS: LADIES, HOUSEWIVES AND PROFESSIONALS -- 1. Women in the salons: Creation and institution of the salon in France, salons and salonieres in England and Germany, decline of the salon, Mary Wollstonecraft and Hannah More -- 2. Women in the parlors: Impact of a rising standard of living, the nineteenth century lady (her life and tasks), the nineteenth century lady (ideals and restrictions), domestication of the queen.
3. Leaving the parlors: Writers, artists and musicians, Charity workers and social reformers, Battle for education and professional training -- 4. Opportunities and limits: change and tradition in the twentieth century: Impact of World War I, traditions reasserted, Mixed blessings of psychology, From domesticity to gracious living (privileged women since 1945) -- VII. WOMEN OF THE CITIES: MOTHERS, WORKERS AND REVOLUTIONARIES -- 1. Family life: Two lives, Moving to the cities, Partnership with a man, Raising larger families, Illegitimacy and unwanted children -- 2. Earning income: Child labor, Single women, Women with children, Old women, Women and religion -- 3. Revolutions and reforms: Urban women in 1789, 1848 and 1871, Impact of a rising standard of living, Women in World War I and the Russian Revolution, Women in the 1930s -- 4. Continuity and change: women in world War II and after: Women in World War II, Working class women since 1945.
IX. TRADITIONS REJECTED: A HISTORY OF FEMINISM IN EUROPE -- 1. Feminism in Europe -- 2. Asserting women's humanity: early European feminists: Christine de Pizan, Early European feminists, Mary Wollstonecraft -- 3. Asserting women's legal and political equality: equal rights movements in Europe: Feminism an liberalism, Feminism and Christianity, Women's rights movements, The English women's rights movement: 1832-1928, Achievements and limitations of equal rights feminism -- 4. Feminist socialism in Europe: Feminism and socialism, Early feminist socialists: Owenites and Saint-Simonians, Marriage, sex and socialism, Feminist socialism in Europe: 1875-1925, Related causes 1925-1945: social welfare, pacifism, and anti-fascism -- 5. The women's liberation movement: From consciousness-raising to political action, Asserting women's right to control their own fertility, Asserting women's right to determine their own sexuality, Toward a woman-centered world.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1587 .A53 1989 V.1 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002322956
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1587 .A53 1989 V.2 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002322949

Includes bibliographical references (v. 1, pages 531-552; v. 2, p. 509-534).

Includes indexes.

Originally published: New York : Harper & Row, ©1988.

VOLUME I -- I. TRADITIONS INHERITED: ATTITUDES ABOUT WOMEN FROM THE CENTURIES BEFORE 800 A.D. -- 1. Buried Traditions: The Question of Origins: Archaeological, biological, psychological, anthropological, written evidence -- 2. Inherited Traditions: The Principal Influences -- 3. Traditions Subordinating Women: Women's approved roles, dishonorable roles (slave, prostitute, concubine), misogyny -- 4. Traditions Empowering Women: Worship of goddesses, women warriors, women in power (queens and empresses), women of wealth, educated and artistic women -- 5. The Effects of Christianity: Beliefs and practices empowering/subordinating women -- II. WOMEN OF THE FIELDS: SUSTAINING THE GENERATIONS -- 1. The Constants of the Peasant Women's World: The Ninth to the Twentieth Centuries: The life, the landscape, the year's activities, children and nurturing, treats to survival -- 2. Sustaining the Generations: The family and marriage, access to the land, additional income, impossible choices, survival outside the family, giving value -- 3. The Extraordinary: Joan of Arc, the witchcraft persecutions -- 4. What Remains of the Peasant Woman's World -- III. WOMEN OF THE CHURCHES: THE POWER OF THE FAITHFUL -- 1. The Patterns of Power and Limitation: The Tenth to the Seventeenth Centuries: -- 2. Authority Within the Institutional Church: The great abbesses and learned holy communities, reformed religious orders (twelfth and thirteenth centuries), the cloistered life of the nun, mystics (the ecstatic life).

3. Authority Outside the Institutional Church: Challenges to established dogma and established orders, the Virgin Mary, exemplars, tertiaries and beguines, heresy (the limits of power through faith) -- 4. Authority Given and Taken Away: The Protestant and Catholic Reformations: Religious enthusiasm reborn (sixteenth and seventeenth centuries), queens, princesses and noblewomen, protesters, proselytizers unorthodox nuns and martyrs, limiting roles (the woman's proper place) -- 5. Traditional Images Redrawn: The female nature, the Christian family -- 6. The Legacy of the Protestant Reformation -- IV. WOMEN OF THE CASTLES AND MANORS: CUSTODIANS OF LAND AND LINEAGE -- 1. From Warrior's Life to Noblewomen: The Ninth to the Seventeenth Centuries -- 2. Constants of the Noblewoman's Life: War, marriage, land, faith and children -- 3. Power and Vulnerability: Wives and daughters in the world of feudalism (ninth to twelfth centuries), courtly love and codes of chivalry, wives and daughters in the world of centralized monarchies (thirteenth to seventeenth centuries), widows and mothers (ninth to seventeenth centuries) -- 4. The New Flowering of Ancient Traditions: In literature, in law and practice, the ideal woman -- V. WOMEN OF THE WALLED TOWNS: PROVIDERS AND PARTNERS -- 1. The Townswoman's Daily Life: The Twelfth to the Seventeenth Centuries: Alleyways, streets and squares, the poor, guildswomen, merchants' wives -- 2. Dangers and Remedies: Natural disasters and war, disease and childbearing, faith in God, repentance and the saints, prayers to the Virgin Mary.

3. The World of Commercial Capitalism: The Thirteenth to Seventeenth Centuries: Protected and provided for, the business of marriage and charity, old crafts, new professions (art and medicine), capitalist entrepreneurs -- 4. The Invisible and Visible Bonds of Misogyny: Old tales retold, sumptuary and adultery laws, abuse of women (violence and ridicule), the ideal marriage and the perfect wife -- VOLUME II -- VI. WOMEN OF THE COURTS: RULERS, PATRONS AND ATTENDANTS -- 1. The world of absolute monarchs from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries -- 2. The life of the courtier: The courtier's roles and rewards, the court setting, costumes and activities -- 3. The traditional life in a grand setting: wife and queen consort: The ideal, education, marriage arrangements, childbearing, the relationship between wives and husbands -- 4. Women rulers: The combination of circumstances, queen mother and regent, royal heir and monarch -- 5. New opportunities: performers and composers, painters, courtesans, writers -- 6. Legacies of renaissance humanism and the scientific revolution: Renewed access to learning, The querelles des femmes 9thedebate over women), science affirms tradition -- VII. WOMEN OF THE SALONS AND PARLORS: LADIES, HOUSEWIVES AND PROFESSIONALS -- 1. Women in the salons: Creation and institution of the salon in France, salons and salonieres in England and Germany, decline of the salon, Mary Wollstonecraft and Hannah More -- 2. Women in the parlors: Impact of a rising standard of living, the nineteenth century lady (her life and tasks), the nineteenth century lady (ideals and restrictions), domestication of the queen.

3. Leaving the parlors: Writers, artists and musicians, Charity workers and social reformers, Battle for education and professional training -- 4. Opportunities and limits: change and tradition in the twentieth century: Impact of World War I, traditions reasserted, Mixed blessings of psychology, From domesticity to gracious living (privileged women since 1945) -- VII. WOMEN OF THE CITIES: MOTHERS, WORKERS AND REVOLUTIONARIES -- 1. Family life: Two lives, Moving to the cities, Partnership with a man, Raising larger families, Illegitimacy and unwanted children -- 2. Earning income: Child labor, Single women, Women with children, Old women, Women and religion -- 3. Revolutions and reforms: Urban women in 1789, 1848 and 1871, Impact of a rising standard of living, Women in World War I and the Russian Revolution, Women in the 1930s -- 4. Continuity and change: women in world War II and after: Women in World War II, Working class women since 1945.

IX. TRADITIONS REJECTED: A HISTORY OF FEMINISM IN EUROPE -- 1. Feminism in Europe -- 2. Asserting women's humanity: early European feminists: Christine de Pizan, Early European feminists, Mary Wollstonecraft -- 3. Asserting women's legal and political equality: equal rights movements in Europe: Feminism an liberalism, Feminism and Christianity, Women's rights movements, The English women's rights movement: 1832-1928, Achievements and limitations of equal rights feminism -- 4. Feminist socialism in Europe: Feminism and socialism, Early feminist socialists: Owenites and Saint-Simonians, Marriage, sex and socialism, Feminist socialism in Europe: 1875-1925, Related causes 1925-1945: social welfare, pacifism, and anti-fascism -- 5. The women's liberation movement: From consciousness-raising to political action, Asserting women's right to control their own fertility, Asserting women's right to determine their own sexuality, Toward a woman-centered world.

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