The Archaeology of Interdependence : European Involvement in the Development of a Sovereign United States.

By: Comer, DouglasMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandSpringerBriefs in Archaeology Ser: Publisher: New York, NY : Springer, 2014Copyright date: ©2013Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (113 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781461460282Subject(s): Europe -- Foreign relations -- United States | United States -- Foreign relations -- Europe | United States -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Archaeology of Interdependence : European Involvement in the Development of a Sovereign United StatesDDC classification: 973.52 LOC classification: CC1-960D1-DX301Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Archaeology of Interdependence -- Contents -- Chapter 1: The American Wars of Independence as Elements of Global Cultural and Political Change -- Culture and History -- Material Culture and Prospects for Developing a Useable Past -- Whose War Is It, Anyway? -- War Re ecting and Reforming Culture -- Military Power, Intelligence, Diplomacy -- The Landscapes -- References -- Chapter 2: Archaeology, Computer Technology, and the Battle of Princeton as a Cross-Cultural, Trans-Atlantic Encounter -- Introduction -- An Anthropological View of the Armies -- Crown Forces -- American Forces -- Historical Context and Summary of the Battle -- Archaeology at Princeton -- Summary and Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3: St. Eustatius: The Nexus for Colonial Caribbean Capitalism -- Introduction -- Historical Background -- St. Eustatius -- A Cradle of Caribbean Capitalism: The Place of St. Eustatius in the Atlantic and Pan-Caribbean Trade -- Dutch and English Banking in the Atlantic World -- The Netherlands (Seventeenth Century): The Golden Age -- The Netherlands in the Eighteenth Century: A Declining Power -- British Banking and the West Indies Trade -- Documents and Archaeology of St. Eustatius' Capitalism and War -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 4: World Powers at Play in the Western Paci c: The Coastal Forti cations of Southern Cebu, Philippines -- Introduction -- The Spanish Lake -- Context of Taosug Raiding -- Fr. Julian Bermejo -- Baroque Landscapes -- Archaeology at Sialo, Zamboanga, Boljoon -- Historical Preservation of the Baluartes and Churches -- Heritage Preservation of the Baluartes -- References -- Chapter 5: Materiality and Meaning: The Search for the Rochambeau Camp in Fairfax County, VA -- Archaeology and the Public Good -- Epistemology, Archaeology, and Commemoration -- Transformation of Public Good to Private Property.
Epistemological Examination of Collective Memory -- Historic Context -- The Movement of the Military Through Virginia and Fairfax County -- Washington and Rochambeau -- The American Wagon Train -- The French Wagon Train -- The Hussars -- The Americans Return North -- The French Return North -- Numbers of Troops at the Giles Run Campsite -- The Design of a French Encampment -- GIS Analysis Using Historic Maps and Aerial Photos -- Archaeological Fieldwork -- Metal Detector Survey -- Excavation -- Artifacts and Features -- Epistemology, Part I: Proof -- Epistemology, Part II: Commemoration -- Proof and Commemoration -- References -- Index.
Summary: The publication explores the ways in which archaeological research can inform us about the manner and motives of European involvement in the development of a sovereign United States. The five chapters  focus on different archaeological sites (four terrestrial sites and one underwater), and each consider the special ways in which archaeology can contribute to our understanding of the cultural dynamics that set the historic course of events in motion that culminated in United States sovereignty. An introduction and conclusion examine how the material culture that is the central focus of archaeological research should be preserved, managed, and interpreted. While much is known through historical documents, this volume seeks to enrich, modify, and challenge the written record by attention to the archaeological remains. The scale of analysis ranges from the artifact through the site to the landscape. Chapters address the changing relationships between specific European countries and the United States as indicated by the presence of artifacts or types of artifacts (e.g., weapons, domestic, architectural) made or traded by other countries during different time periods; an analysis of "space syntax" seen at battlefields or fortifications; the importance of conceptually reconstructing terrain crossed by troops or at battlefields. The Archaeology of Interdependence: European Involvement in the Development of a Sovereign United States presents innovative investigations of what material culture at all scales might tell us about the political, economic, or ideological relationships among cultures that corroborates, contradicts, or enriches the historic record.
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The Archaeology of Interdependence -- Contents -- Chapter 1: The American Wars of Independence as Elements of Global Cultural and Political Change -- Culture and History -- Material Culture and Prospects for Developing a Useable Past -- Whose War Is It, Anyway? -- War Re ecting and Reforming Culture -- Military Power, Intelligence, Diplomacy -- The Landscapes -- References -- Chapter 2: Archaeology, Computer Technology, and the Battle of Princeton as a Cross-Cultural, Trans-Atlantic Encounter -- Introduction -- An Anthropological View of the Armies -- Crown Forces -- American Forces -- Historical Context and Summary of the Battle -- Archaeology at Princeton -- Summary and Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3: St. Eustatius: The Nexus for Colonial Caribbean Capitalism -- Introduction -- Historical Background -- St. Eustatius -- A Cradle of Caribbean Capitalism: The Place of St. Eustatius in the Atlantic and Pan-Caribbean Trade -- Dutch and English Banking in the Atlantic World -- The Netherlands (Seventeenth Century): The Golden Age -- The Netherlands in the Eighteenth Century: A Declining Power -- British Banking and the West Indies Trade -- Documents and Archaeology of St. Eustatius' Capitalism and War -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 4: World Powers at Play in the Western Paci c: The Coastal Forti cations of Southern Cebu, Philippines -- Introduction -- The Spanish Lake -- Context of Taosug Raiding -- Fr. Julian Bermejo -- Baroque Landscapes -- Archaeology at Sialo, Zamboanga, Boljoon -- Historical Preservation of the Baluartes and Churches -- Heritage Preservation of the Baluartes -- References -- Chapter 5: Materiality and Meaning: The Search for the Rochambeau Camp in Fairfax County, VA -- Archaeology and the Public Good -- Epistemology, Archaeology, and Commemoration -- Transformation of Public Good to Private Property.

Epistemological Examination of Collective Memory -- Historic Context -- The Movement of the Military Through Virginia and Fairfax County -- Washington and Rochambeau -- The American Wagon Train -- The French Wagon Train -- The Hussars -- The Americans Return North -- The French Return North -- Numbers of Troops at the Giles Run Campsite -- The Design of a French Encampment -- GIS Analysis Using Historic Maps and Aerial Photos -- Archaeological Fieldwork -- Metal Detector Survey -- Excavation -- Artifacts and Features -- Epistemology, Part I: Proof -- Epistemology, Part II: Commemoration -- Proof and Commemoration -- References -- Index.

The publication explores the ways in which archaeological research can inform us about the manner and motives of European involvement in the development of a sovereign United States. The five chapters  focus on different archaeological sites (four terrestrial sites and one underwater), and each consider the special ways in which archaeology can contribute to our understanding of the cultural dynamics that set the historic course of events in motion that culminated in United States sovereignty. An introduction and conclusion examine how the material culture that is the central focus of archaeological research should be preserved, managed, and interpreted. While much is known through historical documents, this volume seeks to enrich, modify, and challenge the written record by attention to the archaeological remains. The scale of analysis ranges from the artifact through the site to the landscape. Chapters address the changing relationships between specific European countries and the United States as indicated by the presence of artifacts or types of artifacts (e.g., weapons, domestic, architectural) made or traded by other countries during different time periods; an analysis of "space syntax" seen at battlefields or fortifications; the importance of conceptually reconstructing terrain crossed by troops or at battlefields. The Archaeology of Interdependence: European Involvement in the Development of a Sovereign United States presents innovative investigations of what material culture at all scales might tell us about the political, economic, or ideological relationships among cultures that corroborates, contradicts, or enriches the historic record.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Douglas Comer has conducted archaeological heritage management projects around the world as Principal of Cultural Site Research and Management. He is Co-President of ICAHM. Dr. Comer is a specialist in the use of aerial and satellite images and GIS in archaeological research and resource management.

A former Fulbright scholar in Thailand in cultural resource management, he is the author of Ritual Ground: Bent's Old Fort, World Formation, and the Annexation of the Southwest (University of California Press, 1996), as well as many articles dealing with archaeological heritage management and remote sensing technologies.

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