Early Modern Authorship and Prose Continuations : Adaptation and Ownership from Sidney to Richardson.

By: Simonova, NatashaMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandEarly Modern Literature in History Ser: Publisher: London : Palgrave Macmillan Limited, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (233 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781137474131Subject(s): British literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Early Modern Authorship and Prose Continuations : Adaptation and Ownership from Sidney to RichardsonDDC classification: 820.9/35 LOC classification: PN849.G74PN715-PN749Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half-Title -- Series -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgements -- 1 Introduction: Works of Another Hand -- 2 The 'Perfect-Unperfect' Arcadia -- 3 Approaches to Authorship in the Arcadia Continuations -- 4 Rogues and Pilgrims: Two Restoration Bestsellers -- 5 Samuel Richardson vs. the 'High Life Men' -- 6 Closing the Circle: Clarissa and Sir Charles Grandison -- Conclusion: The Fall of the Sequel -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: "Early Modern Authorship and Prose Continuations provides the first in-depth account of fictional sequels in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Examining instances of stories being continued by someone other than the 'original' author, it asks precisely what this distinction has meant historically. Why have some continuations been defined as 'spurious,' and what can this tell us about the development of Early Modern attitudes towards authorship, originality, and narrative closure? Nuanced case studies spanning the period 1590 to 1760 explore paratextual disputes surrounding works by authors including Sir Philip Sidney, John Bunyan, and Samuel Richardson. Prefaces, commendatory verses, and correspondence provide evidence about the motivations of continuation-writers, the responses of authors and 'proprietors' to these texts, and the changing relationships between professional authors and their readers. Making connections between copyright law and literature, Early Modern Authorship and Prose Continuations thus serves as a valuable context for contemporary debates about 'fanfiction' and literary property".
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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K4240-4343 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=2006569 Available EBC2006569

Cover -- Half-Title -- Series -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgements -- 1 Introduction: Works of Another Hand -- 2 The 'Perfect-Unperfect' Arcadia -- 3 Approaches to Authorship in the Arcadia Continuations -- 4 Rogues and Pilgrims: Two Restoration Bestsellers -- 5 Samuel Richardson vs. the 'High Life Men' -- 6 Closing the Circle: Clarissa and Sir Charles Grandison -- Conclusion: The Fall of the Sequel -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

"Early Modern Authorship and Prose Continuations provides the first in-depth account of fictional sequels in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Examining instances of stories being continued by someone other than the 'original' author, it asks precisely what this distinction has meant historically. Why have some continuations been defined as 'spurious,' and what can this tell us about the development of Early Modern attitudes towards authorship, originality, and narrative closure? Nuanced case studies spanning the period 1590 to 1760 explore paratextual disputes surrounding works by authors including Sir Philip Sidney, John Bunyan, and Samuel Richardson. Prefaces, commendatory verses, and correspondence provide evidence about the motivations of continuation-writers, the responses of authors and 'proprietors' to these texts, and the changing relationships between professional authors and their readers. Making connections between copyright law and literature, Early Modern Authorship and Prose Continuations thus serves as a valuable context for contemporary debates about 'fanfiction' and literary property".

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Natasha Simonova completed her PhD at the University of Edinburgh, where she currently holds a postdoctoral fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities. She also writes fiction.

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