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Victorian Poetry and Modern Life : The Unpoetical Age.

By: Moore, Natasha.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Palgrave Studies in Nineteenth-Century Writing and Culture: Publisher: London : Palgrave Macmillan Limited, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (246 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781137537805.Subject(s): English poetry -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Great Britain -- Intellectual life -- 19th century | Modernism (Literature) -- Great BritainGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Victorian Poetry and Modern Life : The Unpoetical AgeDDC classification: 800 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
"Cover" -- "Contents" -- "Acknowledgements" -- "Introduction: A Poem of the Age" -- "1 The Modern and the Everyday" -- "These last days of railroads" -- "Clough and the world’s multitudinousness" -- "Patmore and the heart’s events" -- "Barrett Browning and the live, throbbing age" -- "2 The Long Narrative Poem" -- "Tennyson’s strange diagonal" -- "Come, let us go: The Bothie and Amours de Voyage" -- "The Angel in the House: superseding faith by sight" -- "Aurora Leigh: dreaming and digression" -- "3 The Marriage Plot" -- "Martial longings, marital conflict: marriage and the mid-Victorian crisis of action" -- "The social contract" -- "Marriage, poetry and the public sphere" -- "4 The Uses of Genre" -- "The novel" -- "The epic" -- "Generic hybridity" -- "Metre" -- "The encyclopaedic impulse" -- "Ends" -- "Postscript: Finding a Form for Modern Love " -- "Notes and References" -- "Works Cited".
Summary: Faced with the chaos and banality of modern, everyday life, a number of Victorian poets sought innovative ways of writing about the unpoetic present in their verse. Their varied efforts are recognisably akin, not least in their development of mixed verse-forms that fused novel and epic to create something equal to the miscellaneousness of the age.
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"Cover" -- "Contents" -- "Acknowledgements" -- "Introduction: A Poem of the Age" -- "1 The Modern and the Everyday" -- "These last days of railroads" -- "Clough and the world’s multitudinousness" -- "Patmore and the heart’s events" -- "Barrett Browning and the live, throbbing age" -- "2 The Long Narrative Poem" -- "Tennyson’s strange diagonal" -- "Come, let us go: The Bothie and Amours de Voyage" -- "The Angel in the House: superseding faith by sight" -- "Aurora Leigh: dreaming and digression" -- "3 The Marriage Plot" -- "Martial longings, marital conflict: marriage and the mid-Victorian crisis of action" -- "The social contract" -- "Marriage, poetry and the public sphere" -- "4 The Uses of Genre" -- "The novel" -- "The epic" -- "Generic hybridity" -- "Metre" -- "The encyclopaedic impulse" -- "Ends" -- "Postscript: Finding a Form for Modern Love " -- "Notes and References" -- "Works Cited".

Faced with the chaos and banality of modern, everyday life, a number of Victorian poets sought innovative ways of writing about the unpoetic present in their verse. Their varied efforts are recognisably akin, not least in their development of mixed verse-forms that fused novel and epic to create something equal to the miscellaneousness of the age.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This excellent contribution to Victorian studies draws constructively on the best work on book-length poems in the Victorian period (including Dorothy Mermin's The Audience in the Poem: Five Victorian Poets (1983), Herbert Tucker's Epic: Britain's Heroic Muse, 1790-1910 (2008), and scholarship on all the poets discussed here--principally Arthur Hugh Clough, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Coventry Patmore but also Alfred Lord Tennyson and George Meredith. Moore imparts a wisely qualified coherence to studies of the period's verse-novels, concentrating largely on their subject matter ("the representation of modern, everyday life in verse," as she writes in the introduction), their thematic preoccupations (she "explores the fraught intersection of the modern with the everyday in an effort to restore ... some kind of harmony between system and lifeworld," to quote from chapter 2), intertextual relationships (e.g., Victorian perceptions of Browning's subversion of aspects of Tennyson's Idylls of the King), and questions of genre and poetic form (the verse-novels' composite forms represent "a conception of the age itself as a kind of hybrid," as Moore writes in a chapter titled "The Uses of Genre"). The book is well researched, and the writing is lucid. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. --Terence Hoagwood, Texas A&M University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Natasha Moore is Research Fellow at the Centre for Public Christianity in Sydney, Australia. She received her PhD from the University of Cambridge and has held research fellowships at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Sydney, and the University of Delaware.</p>

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