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The truly disadvantaged : the inner city, the underclass, and public policy / William Julius Wilson.

By: Wilson, William J, 1935-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1990, c1987Edition: Paperback ed.Description: xi, 254 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0226901319 (pbk.); 9780226901312 (pbk.); 0226901300; 9780226901305.Subject(s): Urban poor -- United States | Inner cities -- United States | Urban policy -- United States | African Americans -- Economic conditions | African Americans -- Social conditions | United States -- Race relationsDDC classification: 362.50973 Other classification: MS 1810
Contents:
The ghetto underclass, poverty, and social dislocations: Cycles of deprivation and the ghetto underclass debate -- Social change and social dislocations in the inner city -- Poverty and family structure: the widening gap between evidence and public policy issues (with Kathryn Neckerman) -- Joblessness versus welfare effects: a further reexamination (with Robert Aponte and Kathryn Neckerman) -- The ghetto underclass and public policy: Race-specific policies and the truly disadvantaged -- The limited visions of race relations and the war on poverty -- The hidden agenda -- Urban poverty: a state-of-the-art review of the literature (with Robert Aponte).
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV4045 .W55 1990 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001157270

Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-247) and index.

pt. 1. The ghetto underclass, poverty, and social dislocations: Cycles of deprivation and the ghetto underclass debate -- Social change and social dislocations in the inner city -- Poverty and family structure: the widening gap between evidence and public policy issues (with Kathryn Neckerman) -- Joblessness versus welfare effects: a further reexamination (with Robert Aponte and Kathryn Neckerman) -- pt. 2. The ghetto underclass and public policy: Race-specific policies and the truly disadvantaged -- The limited visions of race relations and the war on poverty -- The hidden agenda -- Appendix: Urban poverty: a state-of-the-art review of the literature (with Robert Aponte).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This eminent sociologist has written a complex and provocative analysis of black inner-city poverty. Eschewing both liberal and conservative orthodoxies, Wilson argues that the substantial increase in urban poverty over the past few decades has not been caused by either contemporary racism or an internalized ``culture of poverty'' value system. Rather it has been the result of major shifts in the economic system, as jobs have left the urban manufacturing sector for a decentralized service sector. Because race-specific policies like affirmative action have tended to benefit the black middle class, only holistic policies available to all Americans who need them can reverse this cycle of poverty. Massive job training programs and more child care would provide a start. Highly recommended for major public and college libraries. Anthony O. Edmonds, History Dept., Ball State Univ., Muncie, Ind. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Wilson (University of Chicago) has expanded on his earlier The Declining Significance of Race (1978), extensively citing demographic data and literature to analyze inner city problems resulting from the complex relationships among residence, poverty, public assistance, and family structure. There has been an exodus of the black middle class and stable working class from the inner city, leaving behind a concentration of socially isolated disadvantaged young blacks, whose number is increasing. This exodus has made it difficult to sustain community institutions, especially in the face of the lack of jobs resulting from the recessions of the 1970s and 1980s and the elimination of jobs with lower educational and skill requirements. As a result, there are few young black men who can support a family. The complexity of these problems, and the importance of structural changes in the economy, are such that the solutions commonly proposed by both liberals and conservatives are inadequate. Needed are macroeconomic policies to promote economic growth and employment opportunities, child support, family allowances and day care. Although there is a good deal of repetition of major themes, the data presented, the analysis, the response to Charles Murray's Losing Ground (CH, Feb '85), and Wilson's proposed solutions, make the book essential for any library concerned with contemporary social problems.-E. Feingold, University of Michigan

Author notes provided by Syndetics

William Julius Wilson, an American sociologist, received his Ph.D. from Washington State University in 1966 and teaches at the University of Chicago. His scholarly work, written from both historical and sociological perspectives, has concentrated on the condition of African Americans living in inner cities, especially the underclass. He stresses urban divisions separating the middle class from the poor. (Bowker Author Biography)

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