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Chemistry, Pharmacy and Revolution in France, 1777-1809.

By: Simon, Jonathan.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Science, Technology and Culture, 1700-1945: Publisher: London : Taylor and Francis, 2016Copyright date: ©2005Description: 1 online resource (196 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317168072.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Chemistry, Pharmacy and Revolution in France, 1777-1809Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- 1 Introduction: Pharmacy and the Chemical Revolution -- The history of pharmacy and the history of science -- Disciplines in science -- Reconsidering the chemical revolution -- The French and chemical revolutions -- 2 From Artisan to Scientist: The Creation and Rise of the French Pharmacist -- Pharmacy: the journey mapped out from 1777 to 1803 -- Founding the Collège de pharmacie de Paris -- Fourcroy and the Société libre des pharmaciens de Paris -- Conclusion -- 3 From Pharmacy to 'Philosophical Chemistry': Glaser, Lemery, Venel, Macquer and Lavoisier -- Nicolas Lemery – chemist or pharmacist? -- The aims of chemistry: Glaser and Lemery -- Christophle Glaser -- Venel & the Encyclopédie -- Pierre-Joseph Macquer – chemistry for chemistry's sake -- Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier – a new system of chemistry -- The Encyclopédie méthodique -- 4 The New Chemistry: Fourcroy, Pharmacy and Revolution -- The life and times of Antoine-Francois de Fourcroy -- Fourcroy and Lavoisier -- Fourcroy's teaching -- Medicine illuminated by the physical sciences -- The origins of revolutionary reform in medical education -- Riding out the political storm -- The provisions of the law of Germinal -- The Journal de pharmacie -- Conclusion -- 5 The New Pharmacy: The First Generation of Chemical Pharmacists -- The Annales de chimie and the Journal de pharmacie -- Pharmacy in the Annales de chimie -- The pros and cons of integration -- The new chemistry after Lavoisier -- Delunel and Thenard -- Fourcroy's heirs: the new pharmacists -- Vauquelin in Paris -- Vauquelin's scientific research and the art of hybrid analysis -- Teaching at the Ecole de Pharmacie -- The Bulletin de pharmacie -- Cadet de Gassicourt's conclusions -- 6 Conclusion -- The Pharmaceutical Revolution -- Coincidences and history -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E.
F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V.
Summary: This book explores the history of pharmacy in France and its relationship to the discipline of chemistry as it emerged at the beginning of the nineteenth century. It argues that an appreciation of the history of pharmacy is essential to a full understanding of the constitution of modern science, in particular the discipline of chemistry. As such, it provides a novel interpretation of the chemical revolution (c.1770-1789) that will, no doubt, generate much debate on the place of the chemical arts in this story, a question that has hitherto lacked sufficient scholarly reflection. Furthermore, the book situates this analysis within the broader context of the French Revolution, arguing that an intimate and direct link can be drawn between the political upheavals and our vision of the chemical revolution. The story of the chemical revolution has usually been told by focusing on the small group of French chemists who championed Lavoisier's oxygen theory, or else his opponents. Such a perspective emphasises competing theories and interpretations of critical experiments, but neglects the challenging issue of who could be understood as practising chemistry in the eighteenth century. In contrast, this study traces the tradition of pharmacy as a professional pursuit that relied on chemical techniques to prepare medicines, and shows how one of the central elements of the chemical revolution was the more or less conscious disassociation of the new chemistry from this ancient chemical art.
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Cover -- Contents -- 1 Introduction: Pharmacy and the Chemical Revolution -- The history of pharmacy and the history of science -- Disciplines in science -- Reconsidering the chemical revolution -- The French and chemical revolutions -- 2 From Artisan to Scientist: The Creation and Rise of the French Pharmacist -- Pharmacy: the journey mapped out from 1777 to 1803 -- Founding the Collège de pharmacie de Paris -- Fourcroy and the Société libre des pharmaciens de Paris -- Conclusion -- 3 From Pharmacy to 'Philosophical Chemistry': Glaser, Lemery, Venel, Macquer and Lavoisier -- Nicolas Lemery – chemist or pharmacist? -- The aims of chemistry: Glaser and Lemery -- Christophle Glaser -- Venel & the Encyclopédie -- Pierre-Joseph Macquer – chemistry for chemistry's sake -- Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier – a new system of chemistry -- The Encyclopédie méthodique -- 4 The New Chemistry: Fourcroy, Pharmacy and Revolution -- The life and times of Antoine-Francois de Fourcroy -- Fourcroy and Lavoisier -- Fourcroy's teaching -- Medicine illuminated by the physical sciences -- The origins of revolutionary reform in medical education -- Riding out the political storm -- The provisions of the law of Germinal -- The Journal de pharmacie -- Conclusion -- 5 The New Pharmacy: The First Generation of Chemical Pharmacists -- The Annales de chimie and the Journal de pharmacie -- Pharmacy in the Annales de chimie -- The pros and cons of integration -- The new chemistry after Lavoisier -- Delunel and Thenard -- Fourcroy's heirs: the new pharmacists -- Vauquelin in Paris -- Vauquelin's scientific research and the art of hybrid analysis -- Teaching at the Ecole de Pharmacie -- The Bulletin de pharmacie -- Cadet de Gassicourt's conclusions -- 6 Conclusion -- The Pharmaceutical Revolution -- Coincidences and history -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E.

F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V.

This book explores the history of pharmacy in France and its relationship to the discipline of chemistry as it emerged at the beginning of the nineteenth century. It argues that an appreciation of the history of pharmacy is essential to a full understanding of the constitution of modern science, in particular the discipline of chemistry. As such, it provides a novel interpretation of the chemical revolution (c.1770-1789) that will, no doubt, generate much debate on the place of the chemical arts in this story, a question that has hitherto lacked sufficient scholarly reflection. Furthermore, the book situates this analysis within the broader context of the French Revolution, arguing that an intimate and direct link can be drawn between the political upheavals and our vision of the chemical revolution. The story of the chemical revolution has usually been told by focusing on the small group of French chemists who championed Lavoisier's oxygen theory, or else his opponents. Such a perspective emphasises competing theories and interpretations of critical experiments, but neglects the challenging issue of who could be understood as practising chemistry in the eighteenth century. In contrast, this study traces the tradition of pharmacy as a professional pursuit that relied on chemical techniques to prepare medicines, and shows how one of the central elements of the chemical revolution was the more or less conscious disassociation of the new chemistry from this ancient chemical art.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Dr Simon currently teaches at Département d'Histoire et de la Philosophie des Sciences de la Vie et de la Santé, Université Louis Pasteur, 4 rue Kirschleger, 67000, Strasbourg, France.

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