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Sociological Theory Beyond the Canon.

By: Alatas, Syed Farid.
Contributor(s): Sinha, Vineeta.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: London : Palgrave Macmillan Limited, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (395 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781137411341.Subject(s): ImperialismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sociological Theory Beyond the CanonDDC classification: 301 LOC classification: H61H61-H61.62B63JV61Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Sociological Theory Beyond the Canon -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Introduction: Eurocentrism, Androcentrism and Sociological Theory -- Rethinking Social Theory: Critiquing Eurocentrism -- Introducing Non-Western Social Thought -- Rethinking Sociological Theory: Critiquing Androcentrism -- Introducing Women Thinkers -- Social Thought and Social Theory -- References -- Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406) -- The Life and Times of Ibn Khaldun -- An Outline of Ibn Khaldun's Sociological Theory -- The Method of the New Science -- The Theory of State Formation and Decline -- The Understanding of Reform -- The Marginalization and Recovery of Ibn Khaldun in Modern Sociology -- Conclusion -- Reference -- Karl Marx (1818-1883) -- An Outline of Marx's Sociological Theory -- Feudalism and the Rise of Capitalism -- The Feudal System -- The Rise of Capitalism -- The Asiatic Mode of Production -- Alienation -- Class and Class Consciousness in Capitalist Society -- Capitalism and the State -- The Role of Ideology -- Conclusion -- Harriet Martineau (1802-1876) -- Introduction -- A General Outline of Martineau's Sociological Theories -- Fiction as Social Commentary -- Martineau's 'Science of Morals and Manners' -- Martineau's Compromised Feminism? -- Martineau's Encounter with America -- Freedom and Happiness -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Max Weber (1864-1920) -- An Outline of Weber's Sociological Theory -- Methodology -- The Origins of Modern Capitalism -- The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism -- Weberian Orientalism -- Weber's Orientalism -- The Attribution of Orientalism to Weber -- Social Action, Rationalization and the Metaphor of the Iron Cage -- The Sociology of Authority, Bureaucracy and Excessive Bureaucratization -- Conclusion -- José Rizal (1861-1896) -- Outline of Rizal's Social Theory -- Rizal's Views on Colonial Society.
The Critique of Colonial History -- The Myth of Indolence -- Freedom of Thought and Emancipation -- Rizal's Method of Argumentation -- Conclusion -- Emile Durkheim (1858-1917) -- Introduction -- A General Outline of Durkheim's Sociological Theories -- Durkheim's Methodological Stance -- Theorizing the Emergence of Modernity -- Anomie, Egoism and Abnormal Division of Labour -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Said Nursi (1877-1960) -- The Life and Times of Nursi -- Outline of Nursi's Social Theology -- The Critique of Modern Civilization -- Class, Exploitation and Justice -- Religious Conflict and Reconciliation -- Intra-Muslim Conflict -- Inter-religious Dialogue: Christianity and Islam -- The Methodology of the Risale-i Nur -- Conclusion -- Pandita Ramabai Saraswati (1858-1922) -- Introduction -- General Outline of Ramabai's Work -- Ramabai's Method/Approach to Social Reform -- Ramabai: The Cry of Indian Women -- Ramabai's Comparative Sociological Insights -- Concluding Remarks -- References -- Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) -- Introduction -- General Outline of Nightingale's Work -- Nightingale's Methodology: Reform Through Statistics -- The Problematic of Gender, Family and Marriage -- On India: Colonialism, Industry and Progress -- Concluding Remarks -- References -- Benoy Kumar Sarkar (1887-1949) -- Introduction -- General Outline of Sarkar's Works -- Sarkar's Methodology: Hindu Positivism and the Critique of 'Orientalism' -- Sarkar's Political Sociology -- Theory of Progress: Creative Disequilibrium and Freedom -- Concluding Thoughts -- References -- Epilogue -- The Meaning of Alternative Sociologies -- Cross-Border Interactions, Conversations and Applications -- Some Closing Thoughts -- Reference -- Bibliography -- Index.
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Intro -- Sociological Theory Beyond the Canon -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Introduction: Eurocentrism, Androcentrism and Sociological Theory -- Rethinking Social Theory: Critiquing Eurocentrism -- Introducing Non-Western Social Thought -- Rethinking Sociological Theory: Critiquing Androcentrism -- Introducing Women Thinkers -- Social Thought and Social Theory -- References -- Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406) -- The Life and Times of Ibn Khaldun -- An Outline of Ibn Khaldun's Sociological Theory -- The Method of the New Science -- The Theory of State Formation and Decline -- The Understanding of Reform -- The Marginalization and Recovery of Ibn Khaldun in Modern Sociology -- Conclusion -- Reference -- Karl Marx (1818-1883) -- An Outline of Marx's Sociological Theory -- Feudalism and the Rise of Capitalism -- The Feudal System -- The Rise of Capitalism -- The Asiatic Mode of Production -- Alienation -- Class and Class Consciousness in Capitalist Society -- Capitalism and the State -- The Role of Ideology -- Conclusion -- Harriet Martineau (1802-1876) -- Introduction -- A General Outline of Martineau's Sociological Theories -- Fiction as Social Commentary -- Martineau's 'Science of Morals and Manners' -- Martineau's Compromised Feminism? -- Martineau's Encounter with America -- Freedom and Happiness -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Max Weber (1864-1920) -- An Outline of Weber's Sociological Theory -- Methodology -- The Origins of Modern Capitalism -- The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism -- Weberian Orientalism -- Weber's Orientalism -- The Attribution of Orientalism to Weber -- Social Action, Rationalization and the Metaphor of the Iron Cage -- The Sociology of Authority, Bureaucracy and Excessive Bureaucratization -- Conclusion -- José Rizal (1861-1896) -- Outline of Rizal's Social Theory -- Rizal's Views on Colonial Society.

The Critique of Colonial History -- The Myth of Indolence -- Freedom of Thought and Emancipation -- Rizal's Method of Argumentation -- Conclusion -- Emile Durkheim (1858-1917) -- Introduction -- A General Outline of Durkheim's Sociological Theories -- Durkheim's Methodological Stance -- Theorizing the Emergence of Modernity -- Anomie, Egoism and Abnormal Division of Labour -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Said Nursi (1877-1960) -- The Life and Times of Nursi -- Outline of Nursi's Social Theology -- The Critique of Modern Civilization -- Class, Exploitation and Justice -- Religious Conflict and Reconciliation -- Intra-Muslim Conflict -- Inter-religious Dialogue: Christianity and Islam -- The Methodology of the Risale-i Nur -- Conclusion -- Pandita Ramabai Saraswati (1858-1922) -- Introduction -- General Outline of Ramabai's Work -- Ramabai's Method/Approach to Social Reform -- Ramabai: The Cry of Indian Women -- Ramabai's Comparative Sociological Insights -- Concluding Remarks -- References -- Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) -- Introduction -- General Outline of Nightingale's Work -- Nightingale's Methodology: Reform Through Statistics -- The Problematic of Gender, Family and Marriage -- On India: Colonialism, Industry and Progress -- Concluding Remarks -- References -- Benoy Kumar Sarkar (1887-1949) -- Introduction -- General Outline of Sarkar's Works -- Sarkar's Methodology: Hindu Positivism and the Critique of 'Orientalism' -- Sarkar's Political Sociology -- Theory of Progress: Creative Disequilibrium and Freedom -- Concluding Thoughts -- References -- Epilogue -- The Meaning of Alternative Sociologies -- Cross-Border Interactions, Conversations and Applications -- Some Closing Thoughts -- Reference -- Bibliography -- Index.

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CHOICE Review

This long-awaited book on sociological theory makes commendable efforts to go beyond Western canons to include classical Orientalist contributions, and beyond the dominant androcentric paradigms to include women's perspectives, like those of Harriet Martineau, Pandita Saraswati, and Florence Nightingale. Twelve biographical chapters begin with the foundational work of Ibn Khaldoun on historical sociological theory to demonstrate that Eurocentrism is flawed in its assumption of universalism and neglects original contributions from Africa and Asia. Khaldoun, an African, predated Western sociology and also appeared more sensitive to gender issues than later Western theorists by asserting that the moral society of the Bedouin nomads could not have kept adultery secret. Marx, Weber, and Durkheim are included by way of critiques of their androcentric and Eurocentric biases. Marx relatively acquitted himself of the charge of Eurocentrism by theorizing about the Asiatic mode of production. Other sociologists profiled include José Rizal, Said Nursi, and Benoy Kumar Sarkar, but W. E. B. Du Bois and Ida B. Wells were regrettably excluded from these founders of classical sociological theory. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Biko Agozino, Virginia Tech

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Syed Farid Alatas is Professor of Sociology, at the National University of Singapore. His areas of interest are the sociology of Islam, social theory, religion and reform, and intra- and inter-religious dialogue. He is the author of Ibn Khaldun and Applying Ibn Khaldun: The Recovery of a Lost Tradition in Sociology .</p> <p>Vineeta Sinha is Professor and Head of the South Asian Studies Programme and of the Department of Sociology at the National University of Singapore. Her areas of interest are Hindu religiosity in the Diaspora, religion and commodification processes and religion-state encounters. Her recent books are Religion and Commodification: Merchandising Diasporic Hinduism, Religion-State Encounters in Hindu Domains: From the Straits Settlements to Singapore and Indians .</p>

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