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Medieval misogyny and the invention of Western romantic love / R. Howard Bloch.

By: Bloch, R. Howard.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1991Description: ix, 298 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0226059723 (alk. paper); 9780226059723 (alk. paper); 0226059731 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780226059730 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Women -- History -- Middle Ages, 500-1500 | Social history -- Medieval, 500-1500 | Misogyny -- Europe -- History | Patriarchy -- Europe -- History | Love -- History | Women Social conditions HistoryDDC classification: 305.4/09/02 Other classification: 15.70 | 71.31 | EC 5410 | MS 3000 | NW 8100
Contents:
Molestiae nuptiarum and the Yahwist creation -- Early Christianity and the estheticization of gender -- "Devil's gateway" and "Bride of Christ" -- Poetics of virginity -- Old French lay and the myriad modes of male indiscretion -- Love lyric and the paradox of perfection -- Heiresses and dowagers: the power of women to dispose.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1143 .B56 1991 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001170653

Spine title: Medieval misogyny & the invention of Western romantic love.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 271-290) and index.

Molestiae nuptiarum and the Yahwist creation -- Early Christianity and the estheticization of gender -- "Devil's gateway" and "Bride of Christ" -- Poetics of virginity -- Old French lay and the myriad modes of male indiscretion -- Love lyric and the paradox of perfection -- Heiresses and dowagers: the power of women to dispose.

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CHOICE Review

Returning to familiar ground in this fascinating and well-reasoned work, Bloch argues that Western notions of misogyny, developed from the writings of the early Church Fathers by the 4th century, profoundly influenced the invention of romantic love in the 12th century. He maintains that Christian writers created the topoi of woman as simultaneously the ^D["Devil's gateway^D]" and the ^D["Bride of Christ^D]" rather than as mutually exclusive alternatives. Since no individual woman was capable of being both, women were effectively ^D["abstracted^D]" from history. Locating the ^D["core of the medieval discourse^D]" on misogyny in writings on virginity, Bloch believes that William IX, the ^D["antifeminist^D]" and first ^D["troubadour,^D]" transformed this misogynist theme of the Virgin Mary into a secular ideal of woman during his dispute with Robert d'Arbrissel, the ^D["profeminist^D]" founder of the monastery of Fontevrault. Specifically reacting to the improved economic and social position of women in southern France, which threatened to place women in the public sphere and hence in history, William embodied the fears of the nobility in an outpouring of courtly love poetry that reduced woman ^D["to the status of a category. . .annihila[ting]. . .the identity of individual women.^D]" Bloch has used both textual evidence and recent studies (e.g., Herlihy and Goody) on family history to support his thesis. Highly recommended to supplement the work of C.S. Lewis, Georges Duby, Peter Brown, Penny Gold, and others. Upper-division undergraduates and above.

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