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Soldat : reflections of a German soldier, 1936-1949 / by Siegfried Knappe and Ted Brusaw ; assisted by Susan Davis McLaughlin.

By: Knappe, Siegfried.
Contributor(s): Brusaw, Charles T | McLaughlin, Susan Davis.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Orion Books, ©1992Edition: 1st ed.Description: xv, 384 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0517588951; 9780517588956.Subject(s): Knappe, Siegfried | Germany. Heer -- Biography | World War, 1939-1945 -- Tank warfare | World War, 1939-1945 -- Campaigns -- Eastern Front | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, German | World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, Soviet | Soldiers -- Germany -- Biography | Knappe, Siegfried | Germany. Heer | World War (1939-1945) | Military campaigns | Soldiers | Tank warfare | Eastern Front (World War (1939-1945)) | Germany | Kriegsgefangener | Offizier | Weltkrieg 1939-1945 | Geschichte 1936 | 1939-1945 | Germany / Heer Biography | Knappe, Siegfried | Soldiers Biography Germany | World War, 1939-1945 Campaigns Eastern Front | World War, 1939-1945 Personal narratives, German | World War, 1939-1945 Prisoners and prisons, Soviet | World War, 1939-1945 Tank warfareGenre/Form: Personal narratives. | Autobiographies. | Biography. | Personal narratives -- German. | Autobiographies. | Personal narratives. | Erlebnisbericht.DDC classification: 940.54/8243 | B
Contents:
The Witch's Caldron (1945) -- Sunny Times (1936-1939) -- The Road to Destruction (1939-1944) -- Tomorrow Will Be Better (1945-1949).
Summary: An uncommonly reflective and illuminating memoir by a German officer who served on virtually all fronts in Europe, Soldat offers a unique inside look at the German side of World War II and a world in ruins.Summary: As military history, Soldat is a rich vein of valuable ore, thanks to Siegfried Knappe's eyewitness participation in so many crucial and significant campaigns of the war--including the desperate defense of Berlin, where Knappe's role as operations officer to General Weidling had him shuttling between the lines of combat and Hitler's headquarters and bunker.Summary: Equally valuable and unusual are Knappe's descriptions of the early days of Operation Barbarosa and the experience of the frontline soldiers during the invasion of Russia. But these first-person accountings are not the book's only appeal.Summary: In Siegfried Knappe we find everyman--a dutiful soldier, a good and decent man. We recognize him as such--even though he unwittingly served a regime of unspeakable horror--because we see ourselves in him. And so we get a rare chance to understand how Hitler motivated a whole generation to carry out his monstrous schemes. And we learn at what cost, as we watch our man struggle to keep his bearings in life as Germany falls into rubble and his whole world collapses.Summary: After describing some five frightful years in a Soviet prison camp, Knappe's touching memoir ends with his deeply moving reunion with his wife and children, when he begins again to pick up the pieces of his life.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D793 .K64 1992 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002329340

Includes index.

The Witch's Caldron (1945) -- Sunny Times (1936-1939) -- The Road to Destruction (1939-1944) -- Tomorrow Will Be Better (1945-1949).

An uncommonly reflective and illuminating memoir by a German officer who served on virtually all fronts in Europe, Soldat offers a unique inside look at the German side of World War II and a world in ruins.

As military history, Soldat is a rich vein of valuable ore, thanks to Siegfried Knappe's eyewitness participation in so many crucial and significant campaigns of the war--including the desperate defense of Berlin, where Knappe's role as operations officer to General Weidling had him shuttling between the lines of combat and Hitler's headquarters and bunker.

Equally valuable and unusual are Knappe's descriptions of the early days of Operation Barbarosa and the experience of the frontline soldiers during the invasion of Russia. But these first-person accountings are not the book's only appeal.

In Siegfried Knappe we find everyman--a dutiful soldier, a good and decent man. We recognize him as such--even though he unwittingly served a regime of unspeakable horror--because we see ourselves in him. And so we get a rare chance to understand how Hitler motivated a whole generation to carry out his monstrous schemes. And we learn at what cost, as we watch our man struggle to keep his bearings in life as Germany falls into rubble and his whole world collapses.

After describing some five frightful years in a Soviet prison camp, Knappe's touching memoir ends with his deeply moving reunion with his wife and children, when he begins again to pick up the pieces of his life.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Knappe's Wehrmacht career began in 1936. He participated in the final collapse of the Eastern Front, then spent more than four years as a Russian POW. Readers may doubt Knappe's insistence that he fought not for National Socialism but for Germany, but this mindset, common among his generation, cannot be dismissed out of hand as special pleading or selective memory. His memoir, based heavily on a wartime diary, shows a talented professional soldier and unreflective patriot who initially regarded Hitler as fulfilling legitimate German aspirations; by the time he began probing beneath the regime's surface, it was far too late to take action. Soldat makes a worthwhile companion to Hans von Luck's Panzer Commander ( LJ 10/15/89). Both works highlight an unresolved paradox: never did soldiers perform better in a worse cause than the men who served Adolf Hitler.-- D.E. Showalter, U.S. Air Force Acad., Colorado Springs (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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