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The lost peace : leadership in a time of horror and hope, 1945-1953 / Robert Dallek.

By: Dallek, Robert.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, N.Y. : Harper, ©2010Edition: 1st ed.Description: xii, 420 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780061628665; 0061628662.Subject(s): World War (1939-1945) | Cold War (1945-1989) | World politics -- 1945-1955 | World War, 1939-1945 -- Peace | Cold War | Peace | World politics | Regierung | Internationale Politik | Nachkriegszeit | 1939-1955DDC classification: 909.82/4 Other classification: cou140009895
Contents:
London, Moscow, and Washington: friends in need -- From Tehran to Roosevelt's death -- Collapse and renewal -- Hope and despair -- Irrepressible conflicts? -- Triumph of fear -- Cold war illusions- and realities -- War by other means -- The military solution -- Limited war -- Elusive peace.
Subject: In a reinterpretation of the postwar years, historian Robert Dallek examines what drove the leaders of the most powerful nations around the globe--Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin, Mao, de Gaulle, and Truman--to rely on traditional power politics despite the catastrophic violence their nations had endured. The decisions of these men, for better and often for worse, had profound consequences for decades to come, influencing relations and conflicts with China, Korea, the Middle East, and around the globe. This book is a penetrating look at the misjudgments that caused enormous strife and suffering during this critical period, from the closing months of World War II through the early years of the Cold War. The men who led the world at this time executed astonishingly unwise actions that propelled the nuclear arms race and extended the Cold War. Dallek has written a cautionary tale that considers what might have been done differently.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D843 .D2 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002329209

Includes bibliographical references (pages 373-400) and index.

London, Moscow, and Washington: friends in need -- From Tehran to Roosevelt's death -- Collapse and renewal -- Hope and despair -- Irrepressible conflicts? -- Triumph of fear -- Cold war illusions- and realities -- War by other means -- The military solution -- Limited war -- Elusive peace.

In a reinterpretation of the postwar years, historian Robert Dallek examines what drove the leaders of the most powerful nations around the globe--Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin, Mao, de Gaulle, and Truman--to rely on traditional power politics despite the catastrophic violence their nations had endured. The decisions of these men, for better and often for worse, had profound consequences for decades to come, influencing relations and conflicts with China, Korea, the Middle East, and around the globe. This book is a penetrating look at the misjudgments that caused enormous strife and suffering during this critical period, from the closing months of World War II through the early years of the Cold War. The men who led the world at this time executed astonishingly unwise actions that propelled the nuclear arms race and extended the Cold War. Dallek has written a cautionary tale that considers what might have been done differently.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

At first glance, this reviewer thought, "Oh, brother, another book on the origins of the cold war." But a thorough reading suggests this book is well worth considering. Dallek (An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963), one of our most distinguished historians, who has written on Harry Truman, JFK, and LBJ, among others, has crafted an excellent synthesis of the current literature on President Truman's foreign policy and administration coinciding with some of the most nerve-wracking years of the 20th century. Although Dallek says very little that is new (despite what the book's blurbs declare), he demonstrates his deep knowledge of the history of this country in the postwar era and often takes his story into the 1980s and 1990s. VERDICT Dallek is an eminent historian, and though he is treading familiar ground here, his interpretation of the thinking and actions of American, Chinese, European, and Soviet leaders is worth the book's reasonable price. This is solid historical scholarship from a master.-Ed Goedeken, Iowa State Univ. Lib., Ames (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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