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Patriotic toil : Northern women and the American Civil War / Jeanie Attie.

By: Attie, Jeanie.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 1998Description: xiii, 294 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeSubject(s): United States Sanitary Commission | United States. Army -- Sanitary affairs | United States Sanitary Commission | United States. Army -- Sanitary affairs | USA Sanitary Commission | United States. Army | United States Sanitary Commission | American Civil War (1861-1865) | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Women | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Health aspects | Women -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Amerikaanse burgeroorlog | Vrouwen | Vaderlandsliefde | Onbetaalde arbeid | Thuiswerk | Gelijke rechten | Frau | Sezessionskrieg 1861-1865 | USA -- Nordstaaten | Frau | Armed Forces -- Sanitary affairs | Women | United States | 1800-1899Genre/Form: History.DDC classification: 973.7/082 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
"We All Have Views Now": Tapping Female Patriotism -- Imposing "A Masculine Discipline": A Nationalist Elite and the U.S. Sanitary Commission -- "For the 'Boys in Blue'": Organizing the Homefront -- "A Swindling Concern": Homefront Charges of Corruption -- "Bumping into Each Other": Managers, Canvassers, and Competition -- "Half-Savage Individualism": The USSC Confronts the Female Public -- "Fair Mania": Branch Autonomy and Local Civic Pride -- "It Is a People's War": The USSC Retreats -- "Becoming History": Appraising Female Warwork -- Conclusion: "The Lessons of War."
Review: "During the Civil War, the United States Sanitary Commission attempted to replace female charity networks and traditions of voluntarism with a centralized organization to ensure that women's support for the war effort served an elite, liberal vision of nationhood. After years of debate over women's place in the democracy and status as citizens, soldier relief work offered women an occasion to demonstrate their patriotism and their rights to inclusion in the body politic. Exploring the economic and ideological conflicts that surrounded women's unpaid labor on behalf of the Union army, Jeanie Attie reveals the impact of the Civil War on the gender structure of nineteenth-century America. She illuminates how the war became a testing ground for the gendering of political rights and the ideological separation of men's and women's domains of work and influence."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
New book University of Texas At Tyler
New book shelf - 2nd Floor
E628 .A87 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002329894

Includes bibliographical references (pages 277-280) and index.

"During the Civil War, the United States Sanitary Commission attempted to replace female charity networks and traditions of voluntarism with a centralized organization to ensure that women's support for the war effort served an elite, liberal vision of nationhood. After years of debate over women's place in the democracy and status as citizens, soldier relief work offered women an occasion to demonstrate their patriotism and their rights to inclusion in the body politic. Exploring the economic and ideological conflicts that surrounded women's unpaid labor on behalf of the Union army, Jeanie Attie reveals the impact of the Civil War on the gender structure of nineteenth-century America. She illuminates how the war became a testing ground for the gendering of political rights and the ideological separation of men's and women's domains of work and influence."--Jacket.

1. "We All Have Views Now": Tapping Female Patriotism -- 2. Imposing "A Masculine Discipline": A Nationalist Elite and the U.S. Sanitary Commission -- 3. "For the 'Boys in Blue'": Organizing the Homefront -- 4. "A Swindling Concern": Homefront Charges of Corruption -- 5. "Bumping into Each Other": Managers, Canvassers, and Competition -- 6. "Half-Savage Individualism": The USSC Confronts the Female Public -- 7. "Fair Mania": Branch Autonomy and Local Civic Pride -- 8. "It Is a People's War": The USSC Retreats -- 9. "Becoming History": Appraising Female Warwork -- Conclusion: "The Lessons of War."

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