Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Backing Hitler : consent and coercion in Nazi Germany / Robert Gellately.

By: Gellately, Robert, 1943-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2001Description: xvi, 359 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0198205600; 9780198205609; 0192802917; 9780192802910.Subject(s): Hitler, Adolf, 1889-1945 | Hitler, Adolf, 1889-1945 | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) | World War (1939-1945) | BMBF-Statusseminar | Hitler, Adolf, (1889-1945) | National socialism -- Psychological aspects | Germany -- History -- 1933-1945 | Concentration camps -- Germany | Germany -- Race relations | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Sources | World War, 1939-1945 -- Germany -- Propaganda | World War, 1939-1945 -- Atrocities -- Germany | World War, 1939-1945 -- Atrocities -- Public opinion | War crimes -- Germany -- Public opinion | Allemagne -- Histoire -- 1933-1945 | Allemagne -- Relations raciales | Atrocities | Concentration camps | National socialism -- Psychological aspects | Propaganda | Race relations | War crimes -- Public opinion | Germany | Nationaal-socialisme | Terreur | Publieke opinie | Sympathisanten | Bevölkerung | Nationalsozialistisches Verbrechen | Wahrnehmung | Camps de concentration -- Allemagne | National-socialisme -- Aspect psychologique | Allemagne -- Relations interethniques | Allemagne -- 1933-1945 | Deutschland | Germany -- History -- 1933-1945 | Germany -- Race relations | Geschichte 1933-1945 | 1933-1945Genre/Form: History. | Sources.DDC classification: 943.086 Other classification: 15.70 | j 41 | j 66.5 | j 75.2 | k 41 | k 74 | k 76 | n 85 | n 85.4 | cci1icc | NQ 2230 | NQ 2340 | NQ 2350 | 267000 Hitler, Adolf*by*ob | 8,1
Contents:
Introduction -- Turning away from Weimar -- Police justice -- Concentration camps and media reports -- Shadows of war -- Social outsiders -- Injustice and the Jews -- Special justice for foreign workers -- Enemies in the ranks -- Concentration camps in public spaces -- Dictatorship and people at the end of the Third Reich -- Conclusion.
Summary: Using primary evidence, the author reveals the social consensus behind the Nazi regime and persecution of racial minorities & social outsiders. Debate still rages over how much ordinary Germans knew about the concentration camps and the Gestapo's activities during Hitler's reign. Now, in this well-documented and provocative volume, historian Robert Gellately argues that the majority of German citizens had quite a clear picture of the extent of Nazi atrocities, and continued to support the Reich to the bitter end. Culling chilling evidence from primary news sources and citing dozens of case studies, Gellately shows how media reports and press stories were an essential dimension of Hitler's popular dictatorship. Indeed, a vast array of material on the concentration camps, the violent campaigns against social outsiders, and the Nazis' radical approaches to law and order was published in the media of the day, and was widely read by a highly literate population of Germans. Hitler, Gellately reveals, did not try to hide the existence of the Gestapo or of concentration camps. Nor did the Nazis try to cow the people into submission. Instead they set out to win converts by building on popular images, cherished ideals, and long-held phobias. And their efforts succeeded, Gellately concludes, for the Gestapo's monstrous success was due, in large part, to ordinary German citizens who singled out suspected enemies in their midst, reporting their suspicions and allegations freely and in a spirit of cooperation and patriotism. Extensively documented, highly readable and illustrated with never-before-published photographs, Backing Hitler convincingly debunks the myth that Nazi atrocities were carried out in secret. From the rise of the Third Reich well into the final, desperate months of the war, the destruction of innocent lives was inextricably linked to the will of the German people. The Nazis never won a majority in free elections, but soon after Hitler took power most Germans turned away from democracy and backed the Nazi regime. Hitler was able to win growing support even as he established the Gestapo and concentration camps. Yet for over fifty years historians have disputed what the German people knew about these camps and in what ways they were involved in the persecution of race enemies, slave workers, and social outsiders. In this ground-breaking study of Nazi terror within Germany, Robert Gellately finally answers these questions. The author exposes once and for all the substantial consent and active participation of large numbers of ordinary Germans in the terror. He shows that rather than hide their racist and repressive campaigns from the German people the Nazis trumpeted them in the national papers and on the streets. He reveals how they drew on popular images, cherished German ideals, and long held phobias to win converts to their cause. Tracing the story from 1933 to its grim conclusion in 1945, he demonstrates how war and the prospect of defeat radicalized Nazism. As the country spiralled towards defeat, Germans for the most part held on stubbornly. For anyone who dared contemplate surrender or resistance, terror became the order of the day.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DD256.5 .G45 2001 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002330058
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
DD253 .W28 1993 The approaching storm : DD253.5 .H35 1988 The burden of Hitler's legacy / DD256.3 .H347 2014 Disobeying Hitler : DD256.5 .G45 2001 Backing Hitler : DD256.5 K44 1982 The Nazi era, 1919-1945 : DD256.5 .K4756 2008 The Third Reich : DD256.5 .M42 1963 The German catastrophe :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- Turning away from Weimar -- Police justice -- Concentration camps and media reports -- Shadows of war -- Social outsiders -- Injustice and the Jews -- Special justice for foreign workers -- Enemies in the ranks -- Concentration camps in public spaces -- Dictatorship and people at the end of the Third Reich -- Conclusion.

Using primary evidence, the author reveals the social consensus behind the Nazi regime and persecution of racial minorities & social outsiders. Debate still rages over how much ordinary Germans knew about the concentration camps and the Gestapo's activities during Hitler's reign. Now, in this well-documented and provocative volume, historian Robert Gellately argues that the majority of German citizens had quite a clear picture of the extent of Nazi atrocities, and continued to support the Reich to the bitter end. Culling chilling evidence from primary news sources and citing dozens of case studies, Gellately shows how media reports and press stories were an essential dimension of Hitler's popular dictatorship. Indeed, a vast array of material on the concentration camps, the violent campaigns against social outsiders, and the Nazis' radical approaches to law and order was published in the media of the day, and was widely read by a highly literate population of Germans. Hitler, Gellately reveals, did not try to hide the existence of the Gestapo or of concentration camps. Nor did the Nazis try to cow the people into submission. Instead they set out to win converts by building on popular images, cherished ideals, and long-held phobias. And their efforts succeeded, Gellately concludes, for the Gestapo's monstrous success was due, in large part, to ordinary German citizens who singled out suspected enemies in their midst, reporting their suspicions and allegations freely and in a spirit of cooperation and patriotism. Extensively documented, highly readable and illustrated with never-before-published photographs, Backing Hitler convincingly debunks the myth that Nazi atrocities were carried out in secret. From the rise of the Third Reich well into the final, desperate months of the war, the destruction of innocent lives was inextricably linked to the will of the German people. The Nazis never won a majority in free elections, but soon after Hitler took power most Germans turned away from democracy and backed the Nazi regime. Hitler was able to win growing support even as he established the Gestapo and concentration camps. Yet for over fifty years historians have disputed what the German people knew about these camps and in what ways they were involved in the persecution of race enemies, slave workers, and social outsiders. In this ground-breaking study of Nazi terror within Germany, Robert Gellately finally answers these questions. The author exposes once and for all the substantial consent and active participation of large numbers of ordinary Germans in the terror. He shows that rather than hide their racist and repressive campaigns from the German people the Nazis trumpeted them in the national papers and on the streets. He reveals how they drew on popular images, cherished German ideals, and long held phobias to win converts to their cause. Tracing the story from 1933 to its grim conclusion in 1945, he demonstrates how war and the prospect of defeat radicalized Nazism. As the country spiralled towards defeat, Germans for the most part held on stubbornly. For anyone who dared contemplate surrender or resistance, terror became the order of the day.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Gellately (Strassler Professor in Holocaust History, Clark Univ.) analyzes the role of "ordinary" Germans in the Nazi persecution of those deemed social and political outsiders. Under the guise of "law and order," the Nazis suspended regular jurisprudence and substituted arbitrary arrest and imprisonment. Far from carrying out their activities in secret, the Nazis publicized them as steps to the social, political, and racial regeneration of Germany. Many ordinary Germans actively participated in this process, denouncing neighbors as "asocial" elements for associating with Jews or for "suspicious" activities. Denunciations derived from a variety of motivations personal grudges, economic self-interest, or ideological commitment with the full knowledge of what would happen to the victims. By effectively overturning the belief that Hitler and the Nazi party imposed their ideology upon the German people and maintained control through massed police terror, Gellately's book forces us to consider the role of the ordinary citizen in the maintenance of the Nazi dictatorship. His arguments are more sophisticated and ultimately more convincing than Daniel Goldhagen's in Hitler's Willing Executioners (LJ 3/15/96), which saw the German people's adherence as mono-causal (i.e., anti-Semitism). Recommended for all libraries. Frederic Krome, Jacob Rader Marcus Ctr. of the American Jewish Archives, Cincinnati (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

In this excellent book, Gellately (Holocaust studies, Clark Univ.) builds on his earlier The Gestapo and German Society (CH, Oct'91) to examine the extent of popular support for the Nazi regime. He focuses not only on the "ordinary German's" cooperation with the Gestapo, but also on their relationship to the criminal police (kriminalpolizei) and concentration camps. Gellately puts to rest the myth that most Germans were cowed, pliable objects of Nazi propaganda and oppressive policy. Through extensive use of Gestapo, police, and court records, as well as the Nazi press, he shows how many Germans came to actively support, or at a minimum, tolerate, the regime. If some Germans were ready to denounce fellow citizens as well as foreigners for racial, political, and other "crimes" out of ideological conviction, far more acted for opportunistic, personal reasons. Thus, popular assistance benefited the terror regime, while many citizens, in turn, tried to use the system for their own narrow aims. Although the text is occasionally repetitious, Gellately writes well, handles the historiography deftly, and provides detailed notes and a useful bibliographical essay. The book deserves wide circulation. Upper-division undergraduates and above. W. Smaldone Willamette University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert Gellately is the Strassler Professor in Holocaust History at the Center for Holocaust Studies, Department of History, Clark University, USA.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.