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The long fuse : an interpretation of the origins of World War I / Laurence Lafore.

By: Lafore, Laurence Davis.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Prospect Heights, Ill. : Waveland Press, 1997, ©1971Edition: 2nd ed.Description: 284 pages : maps ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0881339547; 9780881339543.Other title: Interpretation of the origins of World War I.Additional physical formats: Online version:: Long fuse.DDC classification: 940.54
Contents:
Truth and the historian -- The lost utopia -- The Austrian anomaly -- The Europe of the armed camps -- The encirclement of Germany -- The bones of a pomeranian grenadier -- The third man falls sick -- The breakdown of Europe -- A note on the bibliography -- Index.
Summary: In analyzing the causes of World War I without concern for the question of guilt, the author places emphasis on two central facts: first, that when statesmen and peoples took actions they knew might lead to war, they were not envisaging the catastrophe that the war became but rather a quick and limited war; and, second, that among the many conflicts that might have led to war, the one that did was the threat to the integrity of Austria-Hungary posed by Serbia and Serb nationalism.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D511 .L19 1997 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002329738
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
D511 .C623 1988 The Coming of the First World War / D511 .G32613 1974 July 1914; D511 .H37 2013 Catastrophe 1914 : D511 .L19 1997 The long fuse : D511 .M257 2013 The war that ended peace : D511 .R325 1995 The origins of World War I, 1871-1914 / D514 .M364 2011 The Russian origins of the First World War /

Truth and the historian -- The lost utopia -- The Austrian anomaly -- The Europe of the armed camps -- The encirclement of Germany -- The bones of a pomeranian grenadier -- The third man falls sick -- The breakdown of Europe -- A note on the bibliography -- Index.

In analyzing the causes of World War I without concern for the question of guilt, the author places emphasis on two central facts: first, that when statesmen and peoples took actions they knew might lead to war, they were not envisaging the catastrophe that the war became but rather a quick and limited war; and, second, that among the many conflicts that might have led to war, the one that did was the threat to the integrity of Austria-Hungary posed by Serbia and Serb nationalism.

Includes bibliograpical refereces and index.

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