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The youngest marcher : the story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, a young civil rights activist / Cynthia Levinson ; illustrated by Vanessa Brantley Newton.

By: Levinson, Cynthia [author.].
Contributor(s): Brantley-Newton, Vanessa [illustrator.].
Material type: TextTextEdition: First edition.Description: 38 unnumbered pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 27 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781481400701; 1481400703.Subject(s): Hendricks, Audrey Faye -- Juvenile literature | Hendricks, Audrey Faye | Hendricks, Audrey Faye | Hendricks, Audrey Faye -- Juvenile literature | African American civil rights workers -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- Biography -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature | Civil rights workers -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | Civil rights movements -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | African American women civil rights workers | Civil rights workers | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Biography | Women -- Biography | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- Biography & Autobiography -- Social Activists | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- United States -- History -- 20th Century | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- People & Places -- United States -- African American | Littérature pour la jeunesse anglaise | Livres illustrés pour enfants | African Americans -- Birmingham (Ala.) -- Biography | Civil rights workers -- Biography | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Birmingham (Ala.) -- History | Civil rights movements -- History | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Biography | Civil rights workers -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Civil rights workers | African American civil rights workers -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- Biography -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature | Civil rights movements -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | Civil rights movements -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History -- 20th century | African American women civil rights workers | Women -- Biography | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Race relations -- Juvenile literature | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Race relations | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Biography | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Race relations | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Biography | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Race relations -- Juvenile literature | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Race relations | Birmingham (Ala.) -- BiographyGenre/Form: Juvenile works. | Picture books. | Biographies. | Biographies. | Juvenile works.DDC classification: 323.09 | B Summary: Meet the youngest known child to be arrested for a civil rights protest in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963, in this picture book that proves you're never too little to make a difference. Nine-year-old Audrey Faye Hendricks intended to go places and do things like anybody else. So when she heard grown-ups talk about wiping out Birmingham's segregation laws, she spoke up. As she listened to the preacher's words, smooth as glass, she sat up tall. And when she heard the plan -- picket those white stores! March to protest those unfair laws! Fill the jails! -- she stepped right up and said, I'll do it! She was going to j-a-a-il!
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
323.09 L665YO (Browse shelf) Available 0000002331163

Includes bibliographical references.

Meet the youngest known child to be arrested for a civil rights protest in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963, in this picture book that proves you're never too little to make a difference. Nine-year-old Audrey Faye Hendricks intended to go places and do things like anybody else. So when she heard grown-ups talk about wiping out Birmingham's segregation laws, she spoke up. As she listened to the preacher's words, smooth as glass, she sat up tall. And when she heard the plan -- picket those white stores! March to protest those unfair laws! Fill the jails! -- she stepped right up and said, I'll do it! She was going to j-a-a-il!

Ages 5-10.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-Levinson's We've Got a Job followed nine-year-old Audrey Faye Hendricks and three other youths who were among the thousands of children and teens who marched for freedom in Birmingham, AL, in 1963. Here, she pulls from that material, including personal interviews, to highlight Hendricks's story for younger audiences, telling it from her subject's perspective. The author introduces the Hendricks family's frequent dinner guests, Mike, Fred, and Jim-the ministers Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Shuttlesworth, and James Bevel, respectively. She also describes the indignities of African American life in Alabama at the time. When Mike's campaign to protest segregation and "fill the jails" doesn't work, young Audrey eagerly volunteers for Jim's new idea-getting children to march. Digital collage illustrations show a young, pigtailed Audrey and her family mostly smiling and happy leading up to the march-she even brings a new board game to pass the time. Pictures and words combine to depict the discomfort of Hendricks's actual experience: loneliness, unpalatable food, angry white interrogators, and even solitary confinement. Like young Audrey, readers will be relieved when her weeklong sentence is up and she goes home to "hot rolls, baptized in butter," and the promise of a brighter future. VERDICT Simplified and sweetened, but still a significant portrayal of Audrey Faye Hendricks and the Children's March. For collections in need of history materials for the younger set.-Kathleen Isaacs, Children's Literature Specialist, Pasadena, MD © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Cynthia Levinson was in high school when Audrey Faye Hendricks marched to jail, and she knows she would not have been as brave as Audrey. But when Cynthia met Audrey forty-five years later, she knew she had to write a book about her for young readers. She spent more than three years interviewing marchers and researching the events. Her book We've Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children's March tells the story for older readers. Cynthia has also written about social justice in Watch Out for Flying Kids: How Two Circuses, Two Countries, and Nine Kids Confront Conflict and Build Community. She and her husband divide their time between Austin, Texas, and Boston, Massachusetts.<br> <br> Vanessa Brantley-Newton is a self-taught artist and has attended both FIT and SVA of New York, where she studied fashion and children's illustration. Vanessa is the illustrator of Ruby's New Home , A Team Stays Together! , and Justin and the Bully --all by Tony and Lauren Dungy--as well as Presenting...Tallulah by Tori Spelling. She hopes that when people look at her work, it will make them feel happy in some way, or even reclaim a bit of their childhood.

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