Voice of freedom : Fannie Lou Hamer, spirit of the civil rights movement / Carole Boston Weatherford ; illustrated by Ekua Holmes.

By: Weatherford, Carole Boston, 1956- [author.]Contributor(s): Holmes, Ekua [illustrator.] | Candlewick Press [publisher.]Material type: TextTextEdition: First editionDescription: 34 pages : color illustrations ; 27 x 29 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780763665319; 0763665312Subject(s): Hamer, Fannie Lou -- Juvenile literature | Hamer, Fannie Lou -- Poetry | Hamer, Fannie Lou | Mississippi Freedom Project -- Juvenile literature | Mississippi Freedom Project | 1900-1999 | African American women civil rights workers -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | Civil rights workers -- United States -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Civil rights movements -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | African American women civil rights workers -- Poetry | Civil rights workers -- Poetry | Civil rights movements -- History -- 20th century -- Poetry | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century -- Poetry | African Americans -- Biography -- Poetry | Women -- Biography -- Poetry | African American women -- Biography -- Poetry | Civil rights workers -- Biography -- Poetry | Civil rights movements -- History -- Poetry | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- Poetry | JUVENILE NONFICTION / Biography & Autobiography / Social Activists | JUVENILE NONFICTION / Poetry | JUVENILE NONFICTION / Social Topics / Prejudice & Racism | African American women civil rights workers | African Americans -- Civil rights | Civil rights movements | Civil rights workers | Race relations | Mississippi -- Race relations -- Juvenile literature | Mississippi | United StatesGenre/Form: Biographies. | Biography. | History. | Juvenile works. | Picture books. | Poetry. | Picture books for children. | Children's poetry | Children's poetry -- 2015. | Picture books. | Poetry. | Biographies. | Caldecott Medal: Honor book -- 2016. | John Steptoe Award for New Talent -- 2016. | Robert F. Sibert Award: Honor book -- 2016. | Biographical poetry -- Juvenile. | Dust jackets (Bindings) -- 2015. | Curriculum resource.DDC classification: 973.04 | B LOC classification: E185.97.H35 | W43 2015
Contents:
Sunflower County, Mississippi -- Delta Blues -- Spoiled -- My mother taught me -- Fair -- Not everyone could move up north -- Worse off than dogs -- Motherhood -- Literacy test -- On the move -- The price of freedom -- SNCC ("Snick") -- The beating -- Injustice -- Running -- Freedom summer -- 1964 Democratic National Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey -- Africa -- Washington -- Black power -- America's problem -- No rest.
Awards: Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Honor, 2016 | Caldecott Honor Book, 2016 | John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award, 2016 | Boston Globe/Horn Book Nonfiction Honor, 2016Summary: "I am sick and tired of being sick and tired." Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten to within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977. Integral to the Freedom Summer of 1964, Ms. Hamer gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that, despite President Johnson's interference, aired on national TV news and spurred the nation to support the Freedom Democrats.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
973.04 W3628VO (Browse shelf) Available 0000002330314
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973 S1394SO So you want to be president? / 973 W436M The Brown paper school presents my backyard history book / 973.04 B6363QU Quiz book on Black America / 973.04 W3628VO Voice of freedom : 973.08 B5764AM Amish home / 973.09 C639B The Black BC's / 973.1 W4283SO Some folks went west /

Includes bibliographical references.

Sunflower County, Mississippi -- Delta Blues -- Spoiled -- My mother taught me -- Fair -- Not everyone could move up north -- Worse off than dogs -- Motherhood -- Literacy test -- On the move -- The price of freedom -- SNCC ("Snick") -- The beating -- Injustice -- Running -- Freedom summer -- 1964 Democratic National Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey -- Africa -- Washington -- Black power -- America's problem -- No rest.

"I am sick and tired of being sick and tired." Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten to within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977. Integral to the Freedom Summer of 1964, Ms. Hamer gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that, despite President Johnson's interference, aired on national TV news and spurred the nation to support the Freedom Democrats.

Ages 10-14.

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Honor, 2016

Caldecott Honor Book, 2016

John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award, 2016

Boston Globe/Horn Book Nonfiction Honor, 2016

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 6 Up-This welcome biography brings to light one of the civil rights movement's most inspiring leaders. The youngest of 20 children, Fannie Lou Hamer grew up in a family of sharecroppers in the Mississippi Delta. Forced to leave school after sixth grade, she joined the rest of her family in the fields picking cotton. Still hungry for knowledge, she found strength in the love of her family and through her Christian faith. Weatherford describes the hardships that Hamer endured. For instance, in 1961, while she was having a small tumor removed, a doctor performed a hysterectomy without her consent; at that time, Mississippi law allowed poor women to be sterilized without their knowledge. Hamer was in her 40s when young activists spoke at her church; until that point, she hadn't known that she could vote, and she volunteered to register. Though she faced threats and in 1963 was brutally beaten, she spent the rest of her life rallying others. Told in the first person from Hamer's own perspective, this lyrical text in verse emphasizes the activist's perseverance and courage, as she let her booming voice be heard. Holmes's beautiful, vibrant collage illustrations add detail and nuance, often depicting Hamer wearing yellow, which reflects her Sunflower County roots and her signature song, "This Little Light of Mine." Pair this title with Don Mitchell's The Freedom Summer Murders (Scholastic, 2014), which features a short chapter on Hamer, for a well-rounded look at this tumultuous, turbulent era. VERDICT Hamer's heroic life story should be widely known, and this well-crafted work should find a place in most libraries.-Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Carole Boston Weatherford has written numerous award-winning books for children, including Becoming Billie Holiday, illustrated by Floyd Cooper, which won a Coretta Scott King Author Award Honor, and the Caldecott Honor-winning Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom, illustrated by Kadir Nelson, which also won an NAACP Image Award. Carole Boston Weatherford lives in North Carolina.

Ekua Holmes is a fine artist whose work explores themes of family, relationships, hope, and faith. In 2013 she was named to the Boston Arts Commission, which oversees public art projects on city property. Voice of Freedom is her first picture book. Ekua Holmes lives in Boston.

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