The White Shaman mural : an enduring creation narrative in the rock art of the Lower Pecos / Carolyn E. Boyd ; with contributions by Kim Cox.

By: Boyd, Carolyn E, 1958- [author.]Contributor(s): Cox, Kim [contributor.]Material type: TextTextSeries: Linda Schele series in Maya and pre-Columbian studies: Publisher: Austin : University of Texas Press, [2016]Edition: First editionDescription: xiv, 203 pages, 1 unnumbered folded leaf of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 29 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeSubject(s): Indians of North America -- Pecos River Valley (N.M. and Tex.) -- Antiquities | Indian art -- Pecos River Valley (N.M. and Tex.) | Petroglyphs -- Pecos River Valley (N.M. and Tex.) | Rock paintings -- Pecos River Valley (N.M. and Tex.) | Pecos River Valley (N.M. and Tex.) -- Antiquities | Indians of North America -- Pecos River Valley (N.M. and Tex.) -- Antiquities | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Archaeology | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Ethnic Studies -- Native American Studies | Antiquities | Indian art | Indians of North America -- Antiquities | Petroglyphs | Rock paintings | United States -- Pecos River ValleyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: White Shaman mural.DDC classification: 976.401 LOC classification: E78.T4 | B69 2016
Contents:
Archaic codices -- The painted landscape -- Transcribing and reading visual texts -- A primer : abiding themes in Mesoamerican thought -- Pilgrimage to creation : a reading of the White Shaman mural informed by Huichol mythology -- Return to creation : a reading of the White Shaman mural informed by Nahua mythology -- The art of transcendence.
Summary: The prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of Texas and Coahuila, Mexico, created some of the most spectacularly complex, colorful, extensive, and enduring rock art of the ancient world. Perhaps the greatest of these masterpieces is the White Shaman mural, an intricate painting that spans some twenty-six feet in length and thirteen feet in height on the wall of a shallow cave overlooking the Pecos River. In The White Shaman Mural, Carolyn E. Boyd takes us on a journey of discovery as she builds a convincing case that the mural tells a story of the birth of the sun and the beginning of time-making it possibly the oldest pictorial creation narrative in North America. Unlike previous scholars who have viewed Pecos rock art as random and indecipherable, Boyd demonstrates that the White Shaman mural was intentionally composed as a visual narrative, using a graphic vocabulary of images to communicate multiple levels of meaning and function.0Drawing on twenty-five years of archaeological research and analysis, as well as insights from ethnohistory and art history, Boyd identifies patterns in the imagery that equate, in stunning detail, to the mythologies of Uto-Aztecan-speaking peoples, including the ancient Aztec and the present-day Huichol. This paradigm-shifting identification of core Mesoamerican beliefs in the Pecos rock art reveals that a shared ideological universe was already firmly established among foragers living in the Lower Pecos region as long as four thousand years ago.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E78.T4 B69 2016 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002330660

Folded plate (1 leaf, 39 x 61 cm, folded to 19 x 16 cm) in pocket.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 177-192) and index.

Archaic codices -- The painted landscape -- Transcribing and reading visual texts -- A primer : abiding themes in Mesoamerican thought -- Pilgrimage to creation : a reading of the White Shaman mural informed by Huichol mythology -- Return to creation : a reading of the White Shaman mural informed by Nahua mythology -- The art of transcendence.

The prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of Texas and Coahuila, Mexico, created some of the most spectacularly complex, colorful, extensive, and enduring rock art of the ancient world. Perhaps the greatest of these masterpieces is the White Shaman mural, an intricate painting that spans some twenty-six feet in length and thirteen feet in height on the wall of a shallow cave overlooking the Pecos River. In The White Shaman Mural, Carolyn E. Boyd takes us on a journey of discovery as she builds a convincing case that the mural tells a story of the birth of the sun and the beginning of time-making it possibly the oldest pictorial creation narrative in North America. Unlike previous scholars who have viewed Pecos rock art as random and indecipherable, Boyd demonstrates that the White Shaman mural was intentionally composed as a visual narrative, using a graphic vocabulary of images to communicate multiple levels of meaning and function.0Drawing on twenty-five years of archaeological research and analysis, as well as insights from ethnohistory and art history, Boyd identifies patterns in the imagery that equate, in stunning detail, to the mythologies of Uto-Aztecan-speaking peoples, including the ancient Aztec and the present-day Huichol. This paradigm-shifting identification of core Mesoamerican beliefs in the Pecos rock art reveals that a shared ideological universe was already firmly established among foragers living in the Lower Pecos region as long as four thousand years ago.

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