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Unwarranted : policing without permission / Barry Friedman.

By: Friedman, Barry, 1958- [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York ; Farrar, Straus, and Giroux , 2017Edition: First edition.Description: xiv, 434 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780374280451; 0374280452.Subject(s): Electronic surveillance -- Law and legislation -- United States | Intelligence service -- United States | Espionage -- United States | Civil rights -- United States | Privacy, Right of -- United States | Law enforcement -- United States | Civil rights. -- United States | LAW -- Constitutional | Civil rights | Electronic surveillance -- Law and legislation | Espionage | Intelligence service | Law enforcement | Privacy, Right of | Intelligence service -- United States | Civil rights -- United States | LAW / Constitutional | Espionage -- United States | Privacy, Right of -- United States | United StatesDDC classification: 344.7305/2 Other classification: LAW018000
Contents:
Introduction: The problems of policing -- Part I: Democratic policing. Policing in secret ; Legislatures that won't legislate ; Courts that can't judge ; Fostering democratic policing -- Part II: Constitutional policing. Searches without warrant ; Searches without probable cause ; General searches ; Discriminatory searches -- Part III: Twenty-first-century policing. Surveillance technology ; Third-party information and the cloud ; Government databases ; Counterterrorism and national security -- Conclusion: The challenges of democratic policing -- Epilogue.
Summary: "As the debate about out-of-control policing heats up, an authority on constitutional law offers a provocative account of how our rights have been eroded. In June 2013, documents leaked by Edward Snowden sparked widespread debate about secret government surveillance of Americans. Just over a year later, the shooting of Michael Brown, a black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, set off protests and triggered concern about militarization and discriminatory policing. In Unwarranted, Barry Friedman argues that these two seemingly disparate events are connected, and that the problem is not so much the policing agencies as it is the rest of us. We allow these agencies to operate in secret and to decide how to police us, rather than calling the shots ourselves. The courts have let us down entirely. Unwarranted is filled with stories of ordinary people whose lives were sundered by policing gone awry. Driven by technology, policing has changed dramatically from cops seeking out bad guys, to mass surveillance of all of society, backed by an increasingly militarized capability. Friedman captures this new eerie environment in which CCTV, location tracking, and predictive policing has made us all suspects, while proliferating SWAT teams and increased use of force puts everyone at risk. Police play an indispensable role in our society. But left under-regulated by us and unchecked by the courts, our lives, liberties, and property are at peril. Unwarranted is a vital, timely intervention in debates about policing, a call to take responsibility for governing those who govern us."--Summary: "As the debate about out-of-control policing heats up, an authority on constitutional law offers a provocative account of how our rights have been eroded"--
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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KF5399 .F75 2017 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002332120

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: The problems of policing -- Part I: Democratic policing. Policing in secret ; Legislatures that won't legislate ; Courts that can't judge ; Fostering democratic policing -- Part II: Constitutional policing. Searches without warrant ; Searches without probable cause ; General searches ; Discriminatory searches -- Part III: Twenty-first-century policing. Surveillance technology ; Third-party information and the cloud ; Government databases ; Counterterrorism and national security -- Conclusion: The challenges of democratic policing -- Epilogue.

"As the debate about out-of-control policing heats up, an authority on constitutional law offers a provocative account of how our rights have been eroded. In June 2013, documents leaked by Edward Snowden sparked widespread debate about secret government surveillance of Americans. Just over a year later, the shooting of Michael Brown, a black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, set off protests and triggered concern about militarization and discriminatory policing. In Unwarranted, Barry Friedman argues that these two seemingly disparate events are connected, and that the problem is not so much the policing agencies as it is the rest of us. We allow these agencies to operate in secret and to decide how to police us, rather than calling the shots ourselves. The courts have let us down entirely. Unwarranted is filled with stories of ordinary people whose lives were sundered by policing gone awry. Driven by technology, policing has changed dramatically from cops seeking out bad guys, to mass surveillance of all of society, backed by an increasingly militarized capability. Friedman captures this new eerie environment in which CCTV, location tracking, and predictive policing has made us all suspects, while proliferating SWAT teams and increased use of force puts everyone at risk. Police play an indispensable role in our society. But left under-regulated by us and unchecked by the courts, our lives, liberties, and property are at peril. Unwarranted is a vital, timely intervention in debates about policing, a call to take responsibility for governing those who govern us."--

"As the debate about out-of-control policing heats up, an authority on constitutional law offers a provocative account of how our rights have been eroded"--

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Friedman (Jacob D. Fuchsberg Professor of Law & founding director, Policing Project, New York Univ. Sch. of Law; The Will of the People) brings to light issues in the current policing environment. Relying on recent cases, he argues that the state of U.S. policing is far from democratic and constitutional, instead frequently encouraging mass surveillance and spying through the use of closed-circuit TV, location tracking, and predicative tactics, as well as excessive force, including stop-and-frisk and SWAT searches. Friedman is hopeful that through the public's engagement with police officials, and through public policy on the use of force, racial bias, and the adoption of new technologies, that a more just form of policing is possible. The book also provides historical analytics of the search warrant and outlines the ways in which police and courts have been permitted to conduct invasive searches. Includes extensive case index notes. VERDICT Friedman is successful in presenting compelling arguments for policing reform, incorporating current issues such as the Michael Brown shooting, the case of Anthony Graber, and Black Lives Matter as support. Most suitable for law or criminology students. [See Prepub Alert, 8/8/16.]-Nathalie Reid, Univ. of California, Los Angeles © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This volume looks at the status of policing in America through a constitutional law lens. It delves into issues with the courts and citizens deciding on policies surrounding policing. Accounts of policing actions gone wrong, from SWAT actions to traffic stops, underpin the arguments Friedman (NYU School of Law) makes. When we trade security for privacy, we actually are allowing our Constitutional rights to be violated. Demonstrated through countless examples, from the famous (the Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson, Missouri) to the unknown (Susan Frunz being searched in her own home without a warrant in Tacoma, Washington), policies regarding policing are called into question, with the vague consent and threat of security overshadowing our privacy rights. This book also discusses the court cases which have led to this erosion of personal security in a manner that is approachable and understandable to the general public. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. --Jamie Aschenbach, Southern Connecticut State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Barry Friedman is the pioneer collector/dealer of Indian trade blankets. He lives in Valencia, California. <p>

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