Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Jim Dandy / Hadley Irwin.

By: Irwin, Hadley.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Toronto : New York : M.K. McElderry Books ; Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; Maxwell Macmillan International, c1994Edition: 1st ed.Description: 135 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0689505949; 9780689505942.Subject(s): Frontier and pioneer life -- Kansas -- Juvenile fiction | Horses -- Juvenile fiction | Cheyenne Indians -- Juvenile fiction | Indians of North America -- Juvenile fiction | Kansas -- Juvenile fictionDDC classification: [Fic] LOC classification: PZ7.I712 | Ji 1994Summary: Living after the Civil War on a Kansas homestead with his stern stepfather, thirteen-year-old Caleb raises a beloved colt and becomes involved in General Custer's raids on the Cheyenne.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Adolescent Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Adolescent Fiction Area
I728JI (Browse shelf) Available 0000001179803

Living after the Civil War on a Kansas homestead with his stern stepfather, thirteen-year-old Caleb raises a beloved colt and becomes involved in General Custer's raids on the Cheyenne.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-After Caleb's father died in the Civil War, his mother remarried a fellow-Quaker, Webb, who took the family west to Kansas. When she dies, 12-year-old Caleb gives his affection to a foal. Horse lovers will delight in the growth of their special bond as spirited Dandy grows; is halter-broken; takes the boy on a wild night ride; and the two of them race with a young Cheyenne, Hawk, and his pony. But in the second half of the book, the tone changes. Webb sells Dandy to Colonel Custer, Caleb runs away to be with his horse, and the two of them are plunged into the bloody battle of Washita, where Hawk is one of the first to die. Sick of death, Caleb tries to run away with Dandy, but when the animal hears the bugle, he harkens to its call and returns to his new master. A note explains that the story is based on a real mount Custer bought from a Kansas farmer. The ending seems abrupt because readers are so rooted in Caleb's voice that, like the boy himself, they miss the foreshadowing of Dandy's lust for battle. Ultimately, this is a coming-of-age story about love and loss. A thought-provoking read that's sure to promote discussion.-Sally Bates Goodroe, Houston Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.