Streets of hope : the fall and rise of an urban neighborhood / Peter Medoff and Holly Sklar.

By: Medoff, Peter, 1957-Contributor(s): Sklar, Holly, 1955-Material type: TextTextPublisher: Boston, MA : South End Press, c1994Description: v, 337 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cmISBN: 0896084833; 9780896084834; 0896084825 (pbk.); 9780896084827 (pbk.)Subject(s): Urban renewal -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Case studies | Community development corporations -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Case studies | Neighborhoods -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Case studiesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Streets of hope.DDC classification: 307.76/09744/61 LOC classification: HT177.B6 | M44 1994
Contents:
Remembering -- Creating the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative -- Don't dump on us: organizing the neighborhood -- Planning an urban village -- Controlling the land through eminent domain -- Land and housing development: the triangle and beyond -- Holistic development: human, economic, environmental -- The power of youth -- Pathfinders.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HT177.B6 M44 1994 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001179951

Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-316) and index.

Remembering -- Creating the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative -- Don't dump on us: organizing the neighborhood -- Planning an urban village -- Controlling the land through eminent domain -- Land and housing development: the triangle and beyond -- Holistic development: human, economic, environmental -- The power of youth -- Pathfinders.

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CHOICE Review

This is the story of the death and rebirth of a financially impoverished neighborhood. By the beginning of the '80s, the dust of white flight having long settled, the Dudley Street area was one of the most depressed in Boston. That is, until a group of residents sought funding from a private foundation to renovate a community center. Upon touring the neighborhood, trustees of the foundation were so struck by what they saw that they decided to focus their energies on the area. An exerted cooperative effort among the residents, the foundation, and city agencies with a stake in the neighborhood brought about the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative (DSNI), which successfully revitalized the area. The authors challenge "culture of poverty" theories by showing how residents struggled through organizing, planning, financing, and partnering. DSNI was born of the community itself; but it is important also to note that the residents could not have achieved what they did without the assistance of outside institutions. Hence, this book shows that hope must be held not only by those who reside within a poverty-stricken neighborhood but by those outside as well. All levels.

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