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The road not taken : Edward Lansdale and the American tragedy in Vietnam / Max Boot.

By: Boot, Max, 1968- [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Liveright Publishing Corporation, [2018]Edition: First edition.Description: xxxix, 717 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780871409416; 0871409410.Subject(s): Lansdale, Edward Geary, 1908-1987 | United States. Central Intelligence Agency -- Officials and employees -- Biography | United States. Air Force -- Officers -- Biography | United States. Army -- Biography | Lansdale, Edward Geary, 1908-1987 | United States. Air Force | United States. Central Intelligence Agency | Vietnam War (1961-1975) | Intelligence officers -- United States -- Biography | Generals -- United States -- Biography | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- United States | United States -- Officials and employees -- Biography | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY -- Military | HISTORY -- Military -- Vietnam War | Armed Forces -- Officers | Employees | Generals | Intelligence officers | United States | 1961-1975Genre/Form: Biographies. | Biography. | Biographies. | Biographies.DDC classification: 959.704/3373092
Contents:
Ad man (1908/1945) -- Colonel Landslide (1945/1954) -- Nation builder (1954/1956) -- Washington warrior (1957/1963) -- Bastard child (1964/1968) -- The beaten man (1968/1987).
Summary: "In chronicling the adventurous life of legendary CIA operative Edward Lansdale, The Road Not Taken definitively reframes our understanding of the Vietnam War. In this epic biography of Edward Lansdale (1908- 1987), the man said to be the fictional model for Graham Greene's The Quiet American, best-selling historian Max Boot demonstrates how Lansdale pioneered a "hearts and mind" diplomacy, first in the Philippines, then in Vietnam. It was a visionary policy that, as Boot reveals, was ultimately crushed by America's giant military bureaucracy, steered by elitist generals and blueblood diplomats who favored troop build-ups and napalm bombs over winning the trust of the people. Through dozens of interviews and access to neverbefore-seen documents--including long-hidden love letters--Boot recasts this cautionary American story, tracing the bold rise and the crashing fall of the roguish "T. E. Lawrence of Asia" from the battle of Dien Bien Phu to the humiliating American evacuation in 1975. Bringing a tragic complexity to this so-called "ugly American," this "engrossing biography" (Karl Marlantes) rescues Lansdale from historical ignominy and suggests that Vietnam could have been different had we only listened. With reverberations that continue to play out in Iraq and Afghanistan, The Road Not Taken is a biography of profound historical consequence"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E840.5.L36 B66 2018 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002331957

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Ad man (1908/1945) -- Colonel Landslide (1945/1954) -- Nation builder (1954/1956) -- Washington warrior (1957/1963) -- Bastard child (1964/1968) -- The beaten man (1968/1987).

"In chronicling the adventurous life of legendary CIA operative Edward Lansdale, The Road Not Taken definitively reframes our understanding of the Vietnam War. In this epic biography of Edward Lansdale (1908- 1987), the man said to be the fictional model for Graham Greene's The Quiet American, best-selling historian Max Boot demonstrates how Lansdale pioneered a "hearts and mind" diplomacy, first in the Philippines, then in Vietnam. It was a visionary policy that, as Boot reveals, was ultimately crushed by America's giant military bureaucracy, steered by elitist generals and blueblood diplomats who favored troop build-ups and napalm bombs over winning the trust of the people. Through dozens of interviews and access to neverbefore-seen documents--including long-hidden love letters--Boot recasts this cautionary American story, tracing the bold rise and the crashing fall of the roguish "T. E. Lawrence of Asia" from the battle of Dien Bien Phu to the humiliating American evacuation in 1975. Bringing a tragic complexity to this so-called "ugly American," this "engrossing biography" (Karl Marlantes) rescues Lansdale from historical ignominy and suggests that Vietnam could have been different had we only listened. With reverberations that continue to play out in Iraq and Afghanistan, The Road Not Taken is a biography of profound historical consequence"-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Air Force officer Edward Lansdale (1908-87) remains a controversial figure in the history of the Vietnam conflict. In their books, David Halberstam and Michael Herr excoriated him. He's a hero in Eugene Burdick and William J. Lederer's The Ugly American. Here, military historian Boot (Invisible Armies) argues that Lansdale's ideas offered our best attempt at success in this new kind of war. While in the Philippines (1950-53), Lansdale orchestrated reformer Ramon Magsaysay's victory at the polls, which led to peace with the Communist Party. But in Vietnam, he faced tougher adversaries. Lansdale was recalled from Vietnam in 1957. Six years later, South Vietnamese president Ngo Dinh Diem was overthrown with U.S. support. Rule by the military ensued, with each new leader as corrupt as the previous one. Lansdale never regained his old touch. His approach of building friendships with indigenous leaders lost out to advocates of big guns and blanket bombing. VERDICT Boot has done a masterly job resuscitating the reputation of a man whom CIA director William Colby called "one of the ten greatest spies of all time." A solid military history and biography, this book will appeal to lovers of both genres.-David Keymer, Cleveland © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Max Boot is a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, a columnist for the Washington Post, and a global affairs analyst for CNN. His most recent book is the New York Times bestseller The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam.

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