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American Ulysses : a life of Ulysses S. Grant / Ronald C. White.

By: White, Ronald C. (Ronald Cedric), 1939- [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Random House, [2016]Edition: First edition.Description: xxvii, 826 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781400069026; 1400069025.Subject(s): Grant, Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson), 1822-1885 | Grant, Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson), 1822-1885 | American Civil War (1861-1865) | Grant, Ulysses S. 1822-1885 | Grant, Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson), 1822-1885 | Grant, Ulysses S Ulysses Simpson 1822-1885 | Presidents -- United States -- Biography | Generals -- United States -- Biography | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Biography | United States -- Politics and government -- 1869-1877 | Generals -- United States -- Biography | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY -- Military | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY -- Presidents & Heads of State | HISTORY -- United States -- Civil War Period (1850-1877) | Generals | Politics and government | Presidents | United States | Presidents -- United States -- Biography | Generals -- United States -- Biography | United States -- History -- 1861-1865, Civil War -- Biography | United States -- Politics and government | Generals -- United States -- Biography | Presidents -- United States -- Biography | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Biography | United States -- Politics and government -- 1869-1877 | 1861-1877Genre/Form: Biographies. | Biography. | History. | Biographies. | Biographies.DDC classification: 973.8/2092 | B
Contents:
Part I. Formation 1630-1848 -- "My family is American" -- "My Ulysses" -- West Point -- "Dear Julia" -- "By treaty or the sword" -- "Army of invasion" -- Part II. Trial 1848-1861 -- Panama -- "Forsaken" -- "Hardscrabble" -- Galena -- Part II. Transformation 1861-1865 -- "I am in to do all I can" -- Belmont -- "Unconditional surrender" -- Shiloh -- William Tecumseh Sherman -- "More than forty Richmonds" -- Vicksburg -- Chattanooga -- "Washington's legitimate successor" -- "Battle of the Wilderness" -- Robert E. Lee -- Petersburg -- Appomattox -- Part IV. Reconstruction 1865-1868 -- "I will keep my word" -- "More & more radical" -- "Let us have peace" -- Part V. President 1869-1877 -- "Gold panic" -- "A radical change in Indian policy" -- "Foreign relations" -- Ku Klux Klan -- "The Gilded Age" -- "Malfeasance!" -- Centennial crisis -- Part VI. World citizen 1879-1885 -- American ambassador abroad -- Grant & Ward -- Final campaign -- Epilogue.
Summary: A "biography of one of America's greatest generals-- and most misunderstood presidents"-- Amazon.com.Summary: "In his time, Ulysses S. Grant was routinely grouped with George Washington and Abraham Lincoln in the "Trinity of Great American Leaders." But the battlefield commander-turned-commander-in-chief fell out of favor in the twentieth century. In American Ulysses, Ronald C. White argues that we need to once more revise our estimates of him in the twenty-first. Based on seven years of research with primary documents--some of them never examined by previous Grant scholars--this is destined to become the Grant biography of our time. White, a biographer exceptionally skilled at writing momentous history from the inside out, shows Grant to be a generous, curious, introspective man and leader--a willing delegator with a natural gift for managing the rampaging egos of his fellow officers. His wife, Julia Dent Grant, long marginalized in the historic record, emerges in her own right as a spirited and influential partner. Grant was not only a brilliant general but also a passionate defender of equal rights in post-Civil War America. After winning election to the White House in 1868, he used the power of the federal government to battle the Ku Klux Klan. He was the first president to state that the government's policy toward American Indians was immoral, and the first ex-president to embark on a world tour, and he cemented his reputation for courage by racing against death to complete his Personal Memoirs. Published by Mark Twain, it is widely considered to be the greatest autobiography by an American leader, but its place in Grant's life story has never been fully explored--until now."--Publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E672 .W48 2016 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002331841

Includes bibliographical references (pages 773-787) and index.

Part I. Formation 1630-1848 -- "My family is American" -- "My Ulysses" -- West Point -- "Dear Julia" -- "By treaty or the sword" -- "Army of invasion" -- Part II. Trial 1848-1861 -- Panama -- "Forsaken" -- "Hardscrabble" -- Galena -- Part II. Transformation 1861-1865 -- "I am in to do all I can" -- Belmont -- "Unconditional surrender" -- Shiloh -- William Tecumseh Sherman -- "More than forty Richmonds" -- Vicksburg -- Chattanooga -- "Washington's legitimate successor" -- "Battle of the Wilderness" -- Robert E. Lee -- Petersburg -- Appomattox -- Part IV. Reconstruction 1865-1868 -- "I will keep my word" -- "More & more radical" -- "Let us have peace" -- Part V. President 1869-1877 -- "Gold panic" -- "A radical change in Indian policy" -- "Foreign relations" -- Ku Klux Klan -- "The Gilded Age" -- "Malfeasance!" -- Centennial crisis -- Part VI. World citizen 1879-1885 -- American ambassador abroad -- Grant & Ward -- Final campaign -- Epilogue.

A "biography of one of America's greatest generals-- and most misunderstood presidents"-- Amazon.com.

"In his time, Ulysses S. Grant was routinely grouped with George Washington and Abraham Lincoln in the "Trinity of Great American Leaders." But the battlefield commander-turned-commander-in-chief fell out of favor in the twentieth century. In American Ulysses, Ronald C. White argues that we need to once more revise our estimates of him in the twenty-first. Based on seven years of research with primary documents--some of them never examined by previous Grant scholars--this is destined to become the Grant biography of our time. White, a biographer exceptionally skilled at writing momentous history from the inside out, shows Grant to be a generous, curious, introspective man and leader--a willing delegator with a natural gift for managing the rampaging egos of his fellow officers. His wife, Julia Dent Grant, long marginalized in the historic record, emerges in her own right as a spirited and influential partner. Grant was not only a brilliant general but also a passionate defender of equal rights in post-Civil War America. After winning election to the White House in 1868, he used the power of the federal government to battle the Ku Klux Klan. He was the first president to state that the government's policy toward American Indians was immoral, and the first ex-president to embark on a world tour, and he cemented his reputation for courage by racing against death to complete his Personal Memoirs. Published by Mark Twain, it is widely considered to be the greatest autobiography by an American leader, but its place in Grant's life story has never been fully explored--until now."--Publisher's description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Presidential historian White (A. Lincoln) offers a comprehensive biography of Civil War general and 18th U.S. president Ulysses S. Grant (1822-85). The author situates Grant's life amid the turmoil of the 19th century, yet makes Grant accessible to modern readers, while rescuing his place in history from "lost cause" historians. Drawing upon the full 33 volumes of The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant as well as hundreds of letters written to his wife, Julia Dent Grant, a portrait emerges of a man deeply devoted to his country, family, and friends. This trust was sometimes abused by acquaintances for their own gain, tarnishing Grant's reputation and destroying his finances, especially during his second term. The author unconvincingly reassesses Grant's drinking habits. What contemporaries saw as evidence of drunkenness, White dismisses as the consequences of accidents or illness. Readers interested in other perspectives of Grant should see Jean Edward Smith's Grant or H.W. Brand's The Man Who Saved the Union. VERDICT This thoughtful and sympathetic portrayal will be appreciated by Civil War enthusiasts and readers of presidential history alike. [See Prepub Alert, 4/3/16.]-Chad E. Statler, -Lakeland Comm. Coll., Kirtland, OH © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ronald C. White, Jr. was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota and grew up in California. He graduated from Northwestern University in 1961 with a B.A., received an M.Div. in 1964 from Princeton Theological Seminary, and earned a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1972. He also studied as a World Council of Churches Scholar at Lincoln Theological College in England. <p> White has written several books, including three on Abraham Lincoln: The Eloquent President: A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words, Lincoln's Greatest Speech: The Second Inaugural, and A. Lincoln: A Biography. He has also been published in the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and The Christian Science Monitor. <p> White is Professor of American Religious History Emeritus at San Francisco Theological Seminary, and he has taught at UCLA, Princeton Theological Seminary, Whitworth University, Colorado College, Fuller Seminary, and Rider University. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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