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Ten dollars to hate : the Texas man who fought the Klan / Patricia Bernstein.

By: Bernstein, Patricia, 1944- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Sam Rayburn series on rural life: no. 23.Publisher: College Station : Texas A & M University Press , 2017Edition: First edition.Description: xii, 368 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781623495299; 1623495296.Subject(s): Lawyers -- Texas -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Ten dollars to hate.DDC classification: 322.4/2097309042 LOC classification: KF373.M557 | B47 2017
Contents:
Introduction -- "The worst beat-up man" : the whipping of R.W. Burleson -- "A pious, prissy-walking, big man" : the awakening of the second Ku Klux Klan -- "Every man who had the instincts of a cheat, a spy, a coward and a cad" : the Klan explodes -- "Fearless as a lion and honest as God's sunshine" : Dan Moody--the early years -- "So silent it seemed like death" : the Klan comes to Texas and expands beyond -- "It just broke his heart" : beyond violence--the Klan's more insidious damage -- "Boys, you'd better disband" : a few voices speak out; opposition grows -- "Our boys who sleep" : opposition to the Klan intensifies -- "Klan victims crushed by tractor" : the atrocities of Mer Rouge--efforts to punish the Klan -- "One of the sharpest legal battles on record in this court" : the Klan on trial -- Epilogue 1. "Texas has been fortunate to have such a man" : the aftermath for Dan Moody -- Epilogue 2. "An affidavit to say you never belonged" : the aftermath for the Ku Klux Klan.
Summary: Ten Dollars to Hate tells the story of the massive Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s--by far the most "successful" incarnation since its inception in the ashes of the Civil War--and the first prosecutor in the nation to successfully convict and jail Klan members. Dan Moody, a twenty-nine-year-old Texas district attorney, demonstrated that Klansmen could be punished for taking the law into their own hands--in this case, for the vicious flogging of a young World War I veteran. The 1920s Klan numbered in the millions and infiltrated politics and law enforcement across the United States, not just in the Deep South. Several states elected Klan-sponsored governors and US senators. Klansmen engaged in extreme violence against whites as well as blacks, promoted outrageous bigotry against various ethnic groups, and boycotted non-Klan businesses. A few courageous public officials tried to make Klansmen pay for their crimes, notably after Klan assaults in California and Texas and two torture-murders in Louisiana. All failed until September 1923 when Dan Moody convicted and won significant prison time for five Klansmen in a tense courtroom in Georgetown, Texas. Moody became a national sensation overnight and went on to become the youngest governor of Texas at the age of 33. The Georgetown cases were the beginning of the end for this iteration of the Klan. Two years later, the head of the Klan in Indiana was convicted of murdering a young woman. Membership dwindled almost as quickly as it had grown, but the Klan's poisonous influence lingered through the decades that followed. Ten Dollars to Hate explores this pivotal--and brutal--chapter in the history of America.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
KF373.M557 B47 2017 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002332336

Includes bibliographical references (pages 285-354) and index.

Introduction -- "The worst beat-up man" : the whipping of R.W. Burleson -- "A pious, prissy-walking, big man" : the awakening of the second Ku Klux Klan -- "Every man who had the instincts of a cheat, a spy, a coward and a cad" : the Klan explodes -- "Fearless as a lion and honest as God's sunshine" : Dan Moody--the early years -- "So silent it seemed like death" : the Klan comes to Texas and expands beyond -- "It just broke his heart" : beyond violence--the Klan's more insidious damage -- "Boys, you'd better disband" : a few voices speak out; opposition grows -- "Our boys who sleep" : opposition to the Klan intensifies -- "Klan victims crushed by tractor" : the atrocities of Mer Rouge--efforts to punish the Klan -- "One of the sharpest legal battles on record in this court" : the Klan on trial -- Epilogue 1. "Texas has been fortunate to have such a man" : the aftermath for Dan Moody -- Epilogue 2. "An affidavit to say you never belonged" : the aftermath for the Ku Klux Klan.

Ten Dollars to Hate tells the story of the massive Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s--by far the most "successful" incarnation since its inception in the ashes of the Civil War--and the first prosecutor in the nation to successfully convict and jail Klan members. Dan Moody, a twenty-nine-year-old Texas district attorney, demonstrated that Klansmen could be punished for taking the law into their own hands--in this case, for the vicious flogging of a young World War I veteran. The 1920s Klan numbered in the millions and infiltrated politics and law enforcement across the United States, not just in the Deep South. Several states elected Klan-sponsored governors and US senators. Klansmen engaged in extreme violence against whites as well as blacks, promoted outrageous bigotry against various ethnic groups, and boycotted non-Klan businesses. A few courageous public officials tried to make Klansmen pay for their crimes, notably after Klan assaults in California and Texas and two torture-murders in Louisiana. All failed until September 1923 when Dan Moody convicted and won significant prison time for five Klansmen in a tense courtroom in Georgetown, Texas. Moody became a national sensation overnight and went on to become the youngest governor of Texas at the age of 33. The Georgetown cases were the beginning of the end for this iteration of the Klan. Two years later, the head of the Klan in Indiana was convicted of murdering a young woman. Membership dwindled almost as quickly as it had grown, but the Klan's poisonous influence lingered through the decades that followed. Ten Dollars to Hate explores this pivotal--and brutal--chapter in the history of America.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

PATRICIA BERNSTEIN is the author of The First Waco Horror: The Lynching of Jesse Washington and the Rise of the NAACP and the president of Bernstein and Associates, a public relations firm in Houston. She has published articles in Texas Monthly, Smithsonian , and Cosmopolitan .

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