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Physiological Ecology : Flux Control in Biological Systems: from Enzymes to Populations and Ecosystems.

By: Schulze, Ernst-Detlef.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Physiological Ecology Ser: Publisher: Saint Louis : Elsevier Science & Technology, 2012Copyright date: ©1994Description: 1 online resource (540 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780323139427.Subject(s): Biological control systems | Ecophysiology | Plant physiologyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Physiological Ecology : Flux Control in Biological Systems: from Enzymes to Populations and EcosystemsDDC classification: 581 LOC classification: QH508 -- .F58 1994Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover -- Flux Control in Biological Systems: From Enzymes to Populations and Ecosystems -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Contributors -- Preface -- Part I: Flux Control at the Cellular Level -- Chapter 1. The Malate Valve: Flux Control at the Enzymatic Level -- I. Introduction -- II. The ATP to NADPH Balance -- III. Redox Control of the Malate Valve -- IV. A Futile Cycle Provides the Machinery for Flux Regulation -- V. Extra Sequences in the Polypeptide Are Responsible for Redox Control -- VI. Energy Expenditure for Redox Control -- VII. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 2. Flux Control at the Level of the Pathway: Studies with Mutants and Transgenic Plants Having a Decreased Activity of Enzymes Involved in Photosynthesis Partitioning -- I. Introduction -- II. The Traditional Approach to the Study of Regulation -- III. Metabolic Regulations Illustrated by Photosynthetic Sucrose Synthesis -- IV. Regulation and Control -- V. Measurement of Flux Control Coefficients Using Mutants and Genetically Manipulated Plants -- VI. Flux Control Coefficients of Rubisco during Photosynthesis -- VII. Flux Control Coefficients of Four Enzymes in a Linear Pathway: Photosynthetic Starch Synthesis -- VIII. Control of Partitioning to Sucrose and Starch: An Example of Control at a Branch Point in Metabolism -- IX. What Determines the Flux Control Coefficient of an Enzyme? -- X. Measurement of Elasticity Coefficients -- XI. Comparison of Flux Control Coefficients and Elasticity Coefficients for PGI and the Cytosolic Frul,6Pase -- XII. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 3. Controlling the Effects of Excessive Light Energy Fluxes: Dissipative Mechanisms, Repair Processes, and Long-Term Acclimation -- I. Introduction -- II. Experimental Approach -- III. Changes in Photosynthetic Capacity -- IV. Changes in Photosynthetic Efficiency.
V. Effects of Multiple Stress -- VI. Conclusions -- References -- Part II: Flux Control at the Organismic Level -- Chapter 4. Plant Growth, Storage, and Resource Allocation: From Flux Control in a Metabolic Chain to the Whole-Plant Level -- I. Introduction -- II. What Is Assimilation and How Is It Related to Growth? -- III. What Is Storage and How Is It Related to Growth? -- IV. Analysis of Whole-Plant Growth Using Mutants and Transgenic Plants -- V. Observations of Growth and Storage in Different Plant Life Forms -- VI. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 5. The Morphogenic Response of Plants to Soil Nitrogen: Adaptive Regulation of Biomass Distribution and Nitrogen Metabolism by Phytohormones -- I. Introduction: Nitrogen-Induced Changes of Root Growth -- II. The Response of Nitrogen Uptake to Nitrogen Supply -- III. Changes in Growth Reduction and in Root-to-Shoot Ratios by Nitrogen Deficiency -- IV. Analysis of Sink-Source Relations of Plants with Different Nitrogen Status -- V. Are Ammonium-Induced Carbon Sinks Morphogenically Effective? -- VI. Cytokinins Control the Growth Patterns of Urtica dioica -- VII. Studies on the Mechanism of Cytokinin Action on Carbon Distribution -- VIII. A Molecular Biological Approach to the Action of Cytokinins -- IX. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6. Regulation by Futile Cycles: The Transport of Carbon and Nitrogen in Plants -- I. Introduction -- II. Export from the Source: Phloem Loading -- III. Long-Distance Solute Transport -- IV. Uptake by the Sink -- V. Conclusions and Outlook -- References -- Chapter 7. The Regulation of Plant Transpiration: Interactions of Feedforward, Feedback, and Futile Cycles -- I. Introduction -- II. The Regulation of Stomata in Response to Dry Air -- III. Stomatal Response to Soil Water Deficits: Feedforward Control by Root Signals.
IV. Coupled Fluxes and Futile Cycles Modulate the Root Signals -- V. Coupled Fluxes of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide Correlated with Maximum Leaf Conductance -- VI. The Regulation of Root-to-Shoot Ratios -- VII. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 8. The Regulation of Plant Water at the Cell, Tissue, and Organ Level: Role of Active Processes and of Compartmentation -- I. Introduction -- II. Water Relations at the Cell Level -- III. Regulation of Tissue Water -- IV. Application of Integrated Theory: Extension Growth -- V. Regulation of Root Water and Solute Relations -- VI. Conclusions and Summary -- References -- Part III: Flux Control at the Soil-Organism Interface -- Chapter 9. Patterns and Regulation of Organic Matter Transformation in Soils: Litter Decomposition and Humification -- I. Introduction -- II. The Soil Carbon Cycle -- III. Methodological Approach -- IV. Composition and Distribution of the Input to Humification -- V. Decomposition and Humification Processes -- VI. Control of Organic Matter Transformations -- VII. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 10. The Effect of Aggregation of Soils on Water, Gas, and Heat Transport -- I. Introduction -- II. The Processes of Aggregate Formation -- III. Hydraulic Aspects -- IV. Thermal Aspects -- V. Aspects of Soil Aeration -- VI. Consequences of Aggregation on Plant Water Use -- VII. Conclusions -- References -- Part IV: Flux Control at the Population and Ecosystem Level -- Chapter 11. Structure and Biomass Transfer in Food Webs: Stability, Fluctuations, and Network Control -- I. Introduction -- II. Cardueae-Insect Food Webs -- III. Network Control of Food Webs -- IV. Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 12. Fluxes in Ecosystems -- I. Introduction -- II. The Ecosystem Concept -- III. Factors Involved in Structure and Organization of Ecosystems.
IV. System Regulation of Fluxes and Stability -- V. System Response -- VI. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13. Adjustment of Gene Flow at the Population, Species, and Ecosystem Level: Thistles and Their Herbivores -- I. Introduction -- II. Adjustment of Gene Flow -- III. Conclusions -- References -- Part V: Flux Control in Biological Systems: A Comparative View -- Chapter 14. Flux Control in Biological Systems: A Comparative View -- I. Introduction -- II. Hierarchy of Resource Limitations for Individual Processes Organisms -- III. Feedforward and Feedback -- IV. Shared Control -- V. Futile Cycles -- VI. Compartmentation and Accumulation -- VII. Coordination and Synchronization -- VIII. Boundaries to Our Knowledge -- IX. Conclusions -- References -- Index -- Physiological Ecology: A Series of Monographs, Texts, and Treatises.
Summary: Comprehending and modelling biomass production, nutrient, and water fluxes in biological systems requires understanding control mechanisms at various levels of organiztion. This new book, with 16 pages of four-colorplates, compares patterns and mechanisms of regulation-starting from enzyme reactions and ending at the population and ecosystem level. By doing so, the book investigates the general principles of how fluxes are adjusted and regulated. Such principles areessential for preparing effective models and for predicting human impacts on ecosystems. Flux Control in Biological Systems: From Enzymes to Populations and Ecosystems will be an essential personal library addition for student and professional environmental biologists, ecologists, physiologists, biochemists, botanists, microbiologists, soil scientists, and zoologists; as well as anyone who investigate patterns of matter and energy transfer in biological systems of different levels of complexity. * Presents the mechanisms of flux control * Explains the similarities of flux control at various levels of complexity and organization * Demonstrates how fluxes are adjusted in complex systems of interacting groups of organisms.
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QH508 -- .F58 1994 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1129982 Available EBC1129982

Front Cover -- Flux Control in Biological Systems: From Enzymes to Populations and Ecosystems -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Contributors -- Preface -- Part I: Flux Control at the Cellular Level -- Chapter 1. The Malate Valve: Flux Control at the Enzymatic Level -- I. Introduction -- II. The ATP to NADPH Balance -- III. Redox Control of the Malate Valve -- IV. A Futile Cycle Provides the Machinery for Flux Regulation -- V. Extra Sequences in the Polypeptide Are Responsible for Redox Control -- VI. Energy Expenditure for Redox Control -- VII. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 2. Flux Control at the Level of the Pathway: Studies with Mutants and Transgenic Plants Having a Decreased Activity of Enzymes Involved in Photosynthesis Partitioning -- I. Introduction -- II. The Traditional Approach to the Study of Regulation -- III. Metabolic Regulations Illustrated by Photosynthetic Sucrose Synthesis -- IV. Regulation and Control -- V. Measurement of Flux Control Coefficients Using Mutants and Genetically Manipulated Plants -- VI. Flux Control Coefficients of Rubisco during Photosynthesis -- VII. Flux Control Coefficients of Four Enzymes in a Linear Pathway: Photosynthetic Starch Synthesis -- VIII. Control of Partitioning to Sucrose and Starch: An Example of Control at a Branch Point in Metabolism -- IX. What Determines the Flux Control Coefficient of an Enzyme? -- X. Measurement of Elasticity Coefficients -- XI. Comparison of Flux Control Coefficients and Elasticity Coefficients for PGI and the Cytosolic Frul,6Pase -- XII. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 3. Controlling the Effects of Excessive Light Energy Fluxes: Dissipative Mechanisms, Repair Processes, and Long-Term Acclimation -- I. Introduction -- II. Experimental Approach -- III. Changes in Photosynthetic Capacity -- IV. Changes in Photosynthetic Efficiency.

V. Effects of Multiple Stress -- VI. Conclusions -- References -- Part II: Flux Control at the Organismic Level -- Chapter 4. Plant Growth, Storage, and Resource Allocation: From Flux Control in a Metabolic Chain to the Whole-Plant Level -- I. Introduction -- II. What Is Assimilation and How Is It Related to Growth? -- III. What Is Storage and How Is It Related to Growth? -- IV. Analysis of Whole-Plant Growth Using Mutants and Transgenic Plants -- V. Observations of Growth and Storage in Different Plant Life Forms -- VI. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 5. The Morphogenic Response of Plants to Soil Nitrogen: Adaptive Regulation of Biomass Distribution and Nitrogen Metabolism by Phytohormones -- I. Introduction: Nitrogen-Induced Changes of Root Growth -- II. The Response of Nitrogen Uptake to Nitrogen Supply -- III. Changes in Growth Reduction and in Root-to-Shoot Ratios by Nitrogen Deficiency -- IV. Analysis of Sink-Source Relations of Plants with Different Nitrogen Status -- V. Are Ammonium-Induced Carbon Sinks Morphogenically Effective? -- VI. Cytokinins Control the Growth Patterns of Urtica dioica -- VII. Studies on the Mechanism of Cytokinin Action on Carbon Distribution -- VIII. A Molecular Biological Approach to the Action of Cytokinins -- IX. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6. Regulation by Futile Cycles: The Transport of Carbon and Nitrogen in Plants -- I. Introduction -- II. Export from the Source: Phloem Loading -- III. Long-Distance Solute Transport -- IV. Uptake by the Sink -- V. Conclusions and Outlook -- References -- Chapter 7. The Regulation of Plant Transpiration: Interactions of Feedforward, Feedback, and Futile Cycles -- I. Introduction -- II. The Regulation of Stomata in Response to Dry Air -- III. Stomatal Response to Soil Water Deficits: Feedforward Control by Root Signals.

IV. Coupled Fluxes and Futile Cycles Modulate the Root Signals -- V. Coupled Fluxes of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide Correlated with Maximum Leaf Conductance -- VI. The Regulation of Root-to-Shoot Ratios -- VII. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 8. The Regulation of Plant Water at the Cell, Tissue, and Organ Level: Role of Active Processes and of Compartmentation -- I. Introduction -- II. Water Relations at the Cell Level -- III. Regulation of Tissue Water -- IV. Application of Integrated Theory: Extension Growth -- V. Regulation of Root Water and Solute Relations -- VI. Conclusions and Summary -- References -- Part III: Flux Control at the Soil-Organism Interface -- Chapter 9. Patterns and Regulation of Organic Matter Transformation in Soils: Litter Decomposition and Humification -- I. Introduction -- II. The Soil Carbon Cycle -- III. Methodological Approach -- IV. Composition and Distribution of the Input to Humification -- V. Decomposition and Humification Processes -- VI. Control of Organic Matter Transformations -- VII. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 10. The Effect of Aggregation of Soils on Water, Gas, and Heat Transport -- I. Introduction -- II. The Processes of Aggregate Formation -- III. Hydraulic Aspects -- IV. Thermal Aspects -- V. Aspects of Soil Aeration -- VI. Consequences of Aggregation on Plant Water Use -- VII. Conclusions -- References -- Part IV: Flux Control at the Population and Ecosystem Level -- Chapter 11. Structure and Biomass Transfer in Food Webs: Stability, Fluctuations, and Network Control -- I. Introduction -- II. Cardueae-Insect Food Webs -- III. Network Control of Food Webs -- IV. Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 12. Fluxes in Ecosystems -- I. Introduction -- II. The Ecosystem Concept -- III. Factors Involved in Structure and Organization of Ecosystems.

IV. System Regulation of Fluxes and Stability -- V. System Response -- VI. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13. Adjustment of Gene Flow at the Population, Species, and Ecosystem Level: Thistles and Their Herbivores -- I. Introduction -- II. Adjustment of Gene Flow -- III. Conclusions -- References -- Part V: Flux Control in Biological Systems: A Comparative View -- Chapter 14. Flux Control in Biological Systems: A Comparative View -- I. Introduction -- II. Hierarchy of Resource Limitations for Individual Processes Organisms -- III. Feedforward and Feedback -- IV. Shared Control -- V. Futile Cycles -- VI. Compartmentation and Accumulation -- VII. Coordination and Synchronization -- VIII. Boundaries to Our Knowledge -- IX. Conclusions -- References -- Index -- Physiological Ecology: A Series of Monographs, Texts, and Treatises.

Comprehending and modelling biomass production, nutrient, and water fluxes in biological systems requires understanding control mechanisms at various levels of organiztion. This new book, with 16 pages of four-colorplates, compares patterns and mechanisms of regulation-starting from enzyme reactions and ending at the population and ecosystem level. By doing so, the book investigates the general principles of how fluxes are adjusted and regulated. Such principles areessential for preparing effective models and for predicting human impacts on ecosystems. Flux Control in Biological Systems: From Enzymes to Populations and Ecosystems will be an essential personal library addition for student and professional environmental biologists, ecologists, physiologists, biochemists, botanists, microbiologists, soil scientists, and zoologists; as well as anyone who investigate patterns of matter and energy transfer in biological systems of different levels of complexity. * Presents the mechanisms of flux control * Explains the similarities of flux control at various levels of complexity and organization * Demonstrates how fluxes are adjusted in complex systems of interacting groups of organisms.

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