Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Gateway to Freedom : The Hidden History of America's Fugitive Slaves.

By: Foner, Eric.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (320 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780191057816.Subject(s): Antislavery movements -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Underground Railroad | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Causes | Vigilance committees -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Gateway to Freedom : The Hidden History of America's Fugitive SlavesDDC classification: 306.3620973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of America's Fugitive Slaves -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Maps and Illustr Ations -- 1: Introduction: Rethinking the Underground railroad -- I -- II -- III -- 2: Slavery and Freedom in New York -- I -- II -- 3: Origins of the Underground Railroad: The New York Vigilance committee -- I -- II -- 4: A Patchwork system: The underground railroad in the 1840s -- I -- II -- 5: The fugitive slave law and the crisis of the Black Community -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 6: The Metropolitan Corridor: The underground railroad in the 1850s -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 7: The Record of Fugitives: An account of runaway slaves in the 1850s -- I -- II -- 8: The End of the Underground Railroad -- I -- II -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Abbreviations Used in Notes -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Slavery and Freedom in New York -- 3. The New York Vigilance Committee -- 4. A Patchwork System -- 5. The Fugitive Slave Law and the Crisis of the Black Community -- 6. The Metropolitan Corridor -- 7. The Record of Fugitives -- 8. The End of the Underground Railroad -- Index.
Summary: The story of how three remarkable New Yorkers helped over 3000 African American slaves escape to a life of liberty in Canada, in the decades before the American Civil War.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1992296 Available EBC1992296

Cover -- Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of America's Fugitive Slaves -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Maps and Illustr Ations -- 1: Introduction: Rethinking the Underground railroad -- I -- II -- III -- 2: Slavery and Freedom in New York -- I -- II -- 3: Origins of the Underground Railroad: The New York Vigilance committee -- I -- II -- 4: A Patchwork system: The underground railroad in the 1840s -- I -- II -- 5: The fugitive slave law and the crisis of the Black Community -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 6: The Metropolitan Corridor: The underground railroad in the 1850s -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 7: The Record of Fugitives: An account of runaway slaves in the 1850s -- I -- II -- 8: The End of the Underground Railroad -- I -- II -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Abbreviations Used in Notes -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Slavery and Freedom in New York -- 3. The New York Vigilance Committee -- 4. A Patchwork System -- 5. The Fugitive Slave Law and the Crisis of the Black Community -- 6. The Metropolitan Corridor -- 7. The Record of Fugitives -- 8. The End of the Underground Railroad -- Index.

The story of how three remarkable New Yorkers helped over 3000 African American slaves escape to a life of liberty in Canada, in the decades before the American Civil War.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Starred Review. Preeminent scholar Foner (DeWitt Clinton Professor of History, Columbia Univ.; The Fiery Trial; Reconstruction) adds to his impressive oeuvre with this fascinating study of the Underground Railroad. The author eschews the common approach of documenting the phenomenon from the South, instead centering his monograph on New York City. Through individuals such as abolitionist Sydney Howard Gay and minister Charles Ray, he demonstrates that ferrying escaped slaves from the city's waterfront to other locales throughout the North was fraught with extreme danger. This was especially true after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, when political and social elites in the city worked with their Southern counterparts to seize escaped slaves, and even free African Americans, in order to preserve their close economic ties. VERDICT This seminal work is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of the United States from the beginning of the sectional conflict between the North and the South to the conclusion of the Civil War. Readers should also strongly consider Passages to Freedom, edited by David W. Blight. [See Prepub Alert, 7/21/14.] John R. Burch, Campbellsville Univ. Lib., KY (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

A new book from Eric Foner (Columbia) is always news, and this one has all of the features that readers have come to associate with its author: wide-ranging research, readable prose, and convincing arguments. Foner's subject, the Underground Railroad, is one of the most popular in US history today, probably because it is a happy example of black and white people working together to advance justice. While acknowledging that much of the legend that grew up around the Underground Railroad after the Civil War (e.g., heroic white conductors aiding passive, terrified runaway blacks) needs revision, Foner also argues that some revisionists have gone too far in denying the existence of any organized network of abolitionists who aided fugitive slaves. The focus is New York City. Using a "Record of Fugitives" kept by abolitionist editor Sydney H. Gay in the 1850s, Foner finds a small group of black and white abolitionists who worked together to move slaves through New York to Canada. The author does not attempt national coverage, so this is not the definitive work on the Underground Railroad. But it is among the best. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. --Thomas D. Hamm, Earlham College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Eric Foner is the preeminent historian of his generation. His books have won the top awards in the profession, and he has been president of both major history organizations, the American Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians. He is the author of Give Me Liberty!, which displays all of his trademark strengths as a scholar, teacher, and writer. A specialist on the Civil War/Reconstruction period, he regularly teaches the nineteenth-century survey at Columbia University, where he is DeWitt Clinton Professor of History. In 2011, Foner's The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery won the Pulitzer Prize in History, the Bancroft Prize, and the Lincoln Prize. His Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad is a 2015 New York Times bestseller. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.