Undocumented lives : the untold story of Mexican migration / Ana Raquel Minian.

By: Minian, Ana Raquel, 1983- [author.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: Massachusetts : Harvard University Press , 2018Description: 328 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780674737037; 0674737032Other title: Untold story of Mexican migrationSubject(s): Mexican Americans -- Ethnic identity | Foreign workers, Mexican -- United States -- HistoryDDC classification: 973/.046872 LOC classification: E184.M5 | M5496 2018
Contents:
Introduction: From neither here nor there -- An excess of citizens -- "A population without a country" -- The intimate world of migrants -- Normalizing migration -- Supporting the hometown from abroad -- The rights of the people -- A law to curtail undocumented migration -- The cage of gold.
Summary: In the 1970s the Mexican government acted to alleviate rural unemployment by supporting the migration of able-bodied men. Millions crossed into the United States to find work that would help them survive as well as sustain their families in Mexico. They took low-level positions that few Americans wanted and sent money back to communities that depended on their support. But as U.S. authorities pursued more aggressive anti-immigrant measures, migrants found themselves caught between the economic interests of competing governments. The fruits of their labor were needed in both places, and yet neither country made them feel welcome. Ana Raquel Minian explores this unique chapter in the history of Mexican migration. Undocumented Lives draws on private letters, songs, and oral testimony to recreate the experience of circular migration, which reshaped communities in the United States and Mexico. While migrants could earn for themselves and their families in the U.S., they needed to return to Mexico to reconnect with their homes periodically. Despite crossing the border many times, they managed to belong to communities on both sides of it. Ironically, the U.S. immigration crackdown of the mid-1980s disrupted these flows, forcing many migrants to remain north of the border permanently for fear of not being able to return to work. For them, the United States became known as the jaula de oro--the cage of gold. Undocumented Lives tells the story of Mexicans who have been used and abused by the broader economic and political policies of Mexico and the United States.--
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E184.M5 M5496 2018 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002330876

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: From neither here nor there -- An excess of citizens -- "A population without a country" -- The intimate world of migrants -- Normalizing migration -- Supporting the hometown from abroad -- The rights of the people -- A law to curtail undocumented migration -- The cage of gold.

In the 1970s the Mexican government acted to alleviate rural unemployment by supporting the migration of able-bodied men. Millions crossed into the United States to find work that would help them survive as well as sustain their families in Mexico. They took low-level positions that few Americans wanted and sent money back to communities that depended on their support. But as U.S. authorities pursued more aggressive anti-immigrant measures, migrants found themselves caught between the economic interests of competing governments. The fruits of their labor were needed in both places, and yet neither country made them feel welcome. Ana Raquel Minian explores this unique chapter in the history of Mexican migration. Undocumented Lives draws on private letters, songs, and oral testimony to recreate the experience of circular migration, which reshaped communities in the United States and Mexico. While migrants could earn for themselves and their families in the U.S., they needed to return to Mexico to reconnect with their homes periodically. Despite crossing the border many times, they managed to belong to communities on both sides of it. Ironically, the U.S. immigration crackdown of the mid-1980s disrupted these flows, forcing many migrants to remain north of the border permanently for fear of not being able to return to work. For them, the United States became known as the jaula de oro--the cage of gold. Undocumented Lives tells the story of Mexicans who have been used and abused by the broader economic and political policies of Mexico and the United States.--

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Minian (history and comparative studies in race and ethnicity, Stanford) contextualizes the post-Bracero (manual worker) Program period of Mexican migration and immigration between 1965 and 1986. She focuses on migration patterns to and from Mexico's Michoacán and Zacatecas regions and Los Angeles. Over 250 oral histories bring a new historical perspective to the Mexican immigration and migration process. Individual chapters contextualize the historical construction of modern Mexican migration and immigration, cross-cultural tensions among Mexican Americans, the sexuality and gender identity of male migrants, and the rise of contemporary anti-immigrant policies in the US. Minian challenges similar published scholarship that centers on the Mexican migration and immigration experience in the US: she is influenced instead by a body of recent Latinx migrant/immigrant scholarship that introduces transnational and cross-cultural perspectives to the existing literature on this critical subject matter. Her research yields insights into the social and ideological impacts that past Mexican migrants and immigrants have had on the current struggle for immigrants' rights in the US. This is also the first scholarship that investigates the sexuality and gender identity of Mexican migrant and immigrant males on both sides of the US border. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels/libraries. --Jose Gomez Moreno, Northern Arizona University

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