Women, gender and industrialisation in England, 1700-1870 / Katrina Honeyman.

By: Honeyman, KatrinaMaterial type: TextTextSeries: British studies series: Publisher: Houndmills [England] : New York : Macmillan Press ; St. Martin's Press, 2000Description: vii, 204 pages ; 23 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeSubject(s): Women -- England -- History | Women -- Employment -- England -- History | Sexual division of labor -- England -- History | Industrialization -- England -- History | Industrialization | Sexual division of labor | Women | Women -- Employment | England | Vrouwen | Sekseverschillen | Arbeidsverdeling | IndustrialisatieGenre/Form: History.DDC classification: 306.3/615/0942 LOC classification: HQ1599.E5 | H66 2000Other classification: 15.70 | 331.4
Contents:
Feminist History and the Historiography of the Industrial Revolution -- Gender and Work before Industrialisation -- Women and the Making of Industrialisation -- Industrialisation and the Making of Gender at Work -- Women, Work and the New Industrial Economy -- The Making of Gender Identities during the Period of Industrialisation -- Industrialisation and the Gendering of Class -- Conclusion. A Gendered Industrial Society.
Review: "In Women, Gender and Industrialisation in England, Honeyman draws on recent scholarship to suggest that the contributions of women workers influenced the direction and progress of the nation's manufacturing industry. This portrayal of women as central and proactive in industrial change lies in stark contrast to the images of women as cheap, malleable, poorly skilled and expendable labour that typify historical accounts. There is no doubt that women were often treated shamefully by employers and male co-workers during the period of industrialisation, but most women were then, as they are now, highly competent, extremely diligent, flexible and adaptable. This book explains the processes by which male workers and others undervalued such qualities, and explores the mechanisms by which industrial society in the nineteenth century emerged as one centrally defined by gender."--Jacket.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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HQ1599.E5 H66 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002336741

Includes bibliographical references (pages 148-194) and index.

"In Women, Gender and Industrialisation in England, Honeyman draws on recent scholarship to suggest that the contributions of women workers influenced the direction and progress of the nation's manufacturing industry. This portrayal of women as central and proactive in industrial change lies in stark contrast to the images of women as cheap, malleable, poorly skilled and expendable labour that typify historical accounts. There is no doubt that women were often treated shamefully by employers and male co-workers during the period of industrialisation, but most women were then, as they are now, highly competent, extremely diligent, flexible and adaptable. This book explains the processes by which male workers and others undervalued such qualities, and explores the mechanisms by which industrial society in the nineteenth century emerged as one centrally defined by gender."--Jacket.

1. Feminist History and the Historiography of the Industrial Revolution -- 2. Gender and Work before Industrialisation -- 3. Women and the Making of Industrialisation -- 4. Industrialisation and the Making of Gender at Work -- 5. Women, Work and the New Industrial Economy -- 6. The Making of Gender Identities during the Period of Industrialisation -- 7. Industrialisation and the Gendering of Class -- 8. Conclusion. A Gendered Industrial Society.

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