No cover image available
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The Phenomenological Beat: Allen Ginsberg's Many Multitudes

By: Karwin, Joseph [author].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Scholar Works at UT Tyler, 2018-05-09T07:00:00ZContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceSubject(s): Ginsberg | phenomenology | Beat Generation | consciousness | Howl | Imagism | American Literature | English Language and LiteratureOnline resources: Thesis Click here to view this thesis. Summary: A considerable amount of critical commentary about Allen Ginsberg has focused on his public persona and on his relationship with the Beat Generation. This focus runs counter to Ginsberg’s own wishes, as he wished to be studied as a poet first, a serious poet, and a poet speaking for a new American voice. By focusing on the poetry and on Ginsberg’s extensive amount of self-analysis, this paper details the main strategies and techniques Ginsberg employed in his poetics, and how he used those techniques to form a modern American voice in poetry. The paper specifically looks at Ginsberg’s relationship to the imagists, his use of meditation and drug use, his focus on the natural breath and its role in the line, his use of melopoeia, logopoeia, and phanopoeia, his reliance on repetition and meter, the concept of juxtaposed imagery and gaps in consciousness, and the ways in which his poetry is phenomenological. The paper also includes analysis of Ginsberg’s poetry after the “Howl” era, as it argues that Ginsberg should not be defined by one poem or by his role in one social movement; instead, the whole of his work should be looked at as a supreme example of a modern American voice.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
UT Tyler Thesis UT Tyler Online
Online
University Archives & Special Collections PN1126 .K37 2018 (Browse shelf) http://hdl.handle.net/10950/1159 Available 1046657758

A considerable amount of critical commentary about Allen Ginsberg has focused on his public persona and on his relationship with the Beat Generation. This focus runs counter to Ginsberg’s own wishes, as he wished to be studied as a poet first, a serious poet, and a poet speaking for a new American voice. By focusing on the poetry and on Ginsberg’s extensive amount of self-analysis, this paper details the main strategies and techniques Ginsberg employed in his poetics, and how he used those techniques to form a modern American voice in poetry. The paper specifically looks at Ginsberg’s relationship to the imagists, his use of meditation and drug use, his focus on the natural breath and its role in the line, his use of melopoeia, logopoeia, and phanopoeia, his reliance on repetition and meter, the concept of juxtaposed imagery and gaps in consciousness, and the ways in which his poetry is phenomenological. The paper also includes analysis of Ginsberg’s poetry after the “Howl” era, as it argues that Ginsberg should not be defined by one poem or by his role in one social movement; instead, the whole of his work should be looked at as a supreme example of a modern American voice.

english

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.