Fraud : An American History from Barnum to Madoff.

By: Balleisen, Edward JMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (495 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400883295Subject(s): Commercial crimes--United States--HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Fraud : An American History from Barnum to MadoffDDC classification: 364.1630973 LOC classification: HV6769.B355 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- PART I: Duplicity and the Evolution of American Capitalism -- Chapter One: The Enduring Dilemmas of Antifraud Regulation -- Chapter Two: The Shape-Shifting, Never-Changing World of Fraud -- PART II: A Nineteenth-Century World of Caveat Emptor (1810s to 1880s) -- Chapter Three: The Porousness of the Law -- Chapter Four: Channels of Exposure -- PART III: Professionalization, Moralism, and the Elite Assault on Deception (1860s to 1930s) -- Chapter Five: The Beginnings of a Modern Administrative State -- Chapter Six: Innovation, Moral Economy, and the Postmaster General's Peace -- Chapter Seven: The Businessmen's War to End All Fraud -- Chapter Eight: Quandaries of Procedural Justice -- PART IV: The Call for Investor and Consumer Protection (1930s to 1970s) -- Chapter Nine: Moving toward Caveat Venditor -- Chapter Ten: Consumerism and the Reorientation of Antifraud Policy -- Chapter Eleven: The Promise and Limits of the Antifraud State -- PART V: The Market Strikes Back (1970s to 2010s) -- Chapter Twelve: Neoliberalism and the Rediscovery of Business Fraud -- List of Abbreviations -- Notes -- Index.
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Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- PART I: Duplicity and the Evolution of American Capitalism -- Chapter One: The Enduring Dilemmas of Antifraud Regulation -- Chapter Two: The Shape-Shifting, Never-Changing World of Fraud -- PART II: A Nineteenth-Century World of Caveat Emptor (1810s to 1880s) -- Chapter Three: The Porousness of the Law -- Chapter Four: Channels of Exposure -- PART III: Professionalization, Moralism, and the Elite Assault on Deception (1860s to 1930s) -- Chapter Five: The Beginnings of a Modern Administrative State -- Chapter Six: Innovation, Moral Economy, and the Postmaster General's Peace -- Chapter Seven: The Businessmen's War to End All Fraud -- Chapter Eight: Quandaries of Procedural Justice -- PART IV: The Call for Investor and Consumer Protection (1930s to 1970s) -- Chapter Nine: Moving toward Caveat Venditor -- Chapter Ten: Consumerism and the Reorientation of Antifraud Policy -- Chapter Eleven: The Promise and Limits of the Antifraud State -- PART V: The Market Strikes Back (1970s to 2010s) -- Chapter Twelve: Neoliberalism and the Rediscovery of Business Fraud -- List of Abbreviations -- Notes -- Index.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Balleisen (Navigating Failure: Bankruptcy and Commercial Society in Antebellum America) demonstrates that fraud has always existed in capitalist America, but that codification of laws against fraud and increased prosecution of those who commit it has changed over the last two centuries. Balleisen uses many examples from the early 1800s through the present to display the egregious use of fraud and the fallout, or lack thereof, from scams. Moreover, he argues that the main problem is knowing and determining the distinction between absolute hucksterism and acts that simply push the bounds of salesman-/showmanship. Tom Perkins narrates effectively with a soft voice, and his steady pace keeps the listener focused. -VERDICT An engaging look at fraud in America and the laws that have come (and gone) to keep citizens safe from financial harm. Fans of Dean Jobb's Empire of Deception: The Incredible Story of a Master Swindler Who Seduced a City and Captivated the Nation will enjoy this book.-Jason L. Steagall, Gateway Technical Coll. Lib., Elkhorn, WI © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The entrepreneurial spirit that has driven the US economy since before the Revolution has also extended to those willing to aggressively market to or swindle unsuspecting citizens, or to create enterprises that moved toward deception. As the economy grew, so too did fraud. Balleisen (history and public policy, Duke Univ.) provides a thoughtful, sweeping examination of fraudulent business activities and the often delayed responses to thwart it. He makes extensive use of newspapers and magazines and a number of institutional archives, such as those of the Better Business Bureau and the National Vigilance Committee, to depict in rich detail numerous fraudulent activities and how people responded. Balleisen notes changes in fraud, particularly exploiting economic innovations and the attitudes toward it. Caveat emptor prevailed and prosecution was difficult prior to the Civil War, but starting in the Gilded Age consumer education programs emerged and, slowly, haphazardly, various government regulations offered protection to consumers and investors, though swindlers circumvented these efforts through increasingly novel means. Balleisen warns that recent deregulation created a climate that has fostered a series of spectacular frauds, from the savings and loan crisis to investor swindling and the mortgage disaster. The chapters on early government regulatory actions are well done. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Raymond M. Hyser, James Madison University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Edward J. Balleisen is professor of history and public policy and vice provost for Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University. He is the author of Navigating Failure: Bankruptcy and Commercial Society in Antebellum America . He lives in Durham, North Carolina.

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