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Divergence and Convergence of Automobile Fuel Economy Regulations : A Comparative Analysis of EU, Japan and the US.

By: Iguchi, Masahiko.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cham : Springer, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (162 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319175003.Subject(s): Automobiles -- Fuel consumption -- Law and legislation -- European Union | Automobiles -- Fuel consumption -- Law and legislation -- Japan | Automobiles -- Fuel consumption -- Law and legislation -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Divergence and Convergence of Automobile Fuel Economy Regulations : A Comparative Analysis of EU, Japan and the USDDC classification: 343.078629253 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Acronyms -- 1 Introduction -- Abstract -- 1.1 Transformation of Business Towards Sustainability -- 1.2 Automobile Industry and Global Climate Change -- 1.3 Research Puzzle and Hypothesis: Regulatory Convergence of Fuel Economy Regulation -- 1.4 Research Objectives: Revealing the Dynamics of Cars and CO2 -- References -- 2 Business Actors in Global Environmental Governance -- Abstract -- 2.1 Business Actors in Global Environmental Governance: A Classification of Business Involvement -- 2.2 Existing Studies: Varieties of Capitalism and Environmental Policy-Making -- 2.3 A Constructivist Perspective on Business Actors and Environmental Governance -- 2.4 Automobile Industry in Global Climate Governance: `Agency with and Beyond the States' -- References -- 3 Construction of European Fuel Economy Regulations for Passenger Cars -- Abstract -- 3.1 Introduction: EU as a Normative Power -- 3.2 The Formative Years: The Early 1990s -- 3.3 The Appearance of the 120 g/km Target: The Late 1990s -- 3.4 EU-Industry Voluntary Target: 1998--2006 -- 3.5 Critical Juncture: 2007 -- 3.6 Target for 2015 and Beyond -- Commission Consultation Process -- Discussion in the European Parliament -- Discussion in the Council of Ministers -- Final Outcome -- Target for Beyond 2015: Legalizing 95 g/km Target -- 3.7 Summary -- References -- 4 Construction of Japanese Fuel Economy Regulations for Passenger Cars -- Abstract -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The Brief History of the Japanese Fuel Economy Regulation: Mid-1970s---Late 1990s -- 4.3 Impacts from the Regulation Abroad -- 4.4 Critical Juncture: 2007 -- 4.5 Target for Beyond 2015 -- 4.6 Summary -- References -- 5 Construction of the US Fuel Economy Regulations for Passenger Cars -- Abstract -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Formative Years: 1970s.
5.3 Stagnation of the CAFE Standards: Mid-1980s -- 5.4 Critical Juncture: Massachusetts v. EPA (2007) -- 5.5 The 2007 Energy Security and Independence Act -- 5.6 Target for 2015 and Beyond -- 5.7 Summary -- References -- 6 Comparative Assessment -- Abstract -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Motive of the Regulation -- 6.3 Importance of Competitiveness Issue in Enhancing Regulations -- 6.4 Decision-Making Process -- 6.5 The Critical Juncture and the Role of Non-state Actors -- 6.6 Implications for 2015 and Beyond -- Implication to Regulatory Convergence for Heavy Duty Vehicles -- `Race to the Top', not `Race to the Bottom' -- References -- 7 Conclusion -- Abstract -- 7.1 Answering the Research Questions: Business Competition and Environmental Policy-Makings -- 7.2 Theoretical Contributions -- Beyond the `Variety of Capitalism' -- Constructing Constructivist Theory: The Regulatory Convergence Is What Competition Make of It -- 7.3 Applicability of `Agency Within and Beyond the State' Model of Regulatory Convergence to Environmental Policies -- 7.4 Future Tasks -- References -- Index.
Summary: This book reveals the mechanisms underlying the convergence of car fuel economy regulations in Europe, Japan and the US by drawing upon a constructivist theory of International Relations and law that focuses on business competition and environmental regulations. It offers new understanding of the topic of cars and an issue of climate change, discussing the emerging phenomenon of convergence of fuel economy regulations; addressing the role of business actors in pushing for climate change action; proposing the new model of agency with and beyond states; and providing insightful case studies from Europe, Japan and the US. The opening chapter reviews the automobile industry and global climate change, providing a background for the discussion to follow. Chapter 2, Business Actors and Global Environmental Governance, grounds the discussion in the field of environmental governance. The third chapter is a case study examining the construction and timing of the European Union's climate policies for automobile CO2 emissions, discussing the underlying factors and the actors influencing the policies. The following chapter argues that Japan adopted its stringent fuel economy regulations primarily because of industry competitiveness, motivated by stringent environmental regulations in export markets and encouraged by a tradition of 'co-regulation' and 'corporatism' to enhance the regulations. Chapter 5 asks why the US, the first country to introduce fuel economy regulations, spent two decades in regulatory stagnation, and discusses how recent US fuel economy regulations came to converge with Japanese and European standards. Chapter 6 compares, contrasts and analyzes fuel economy regulations among the three case studies and identifies policy implications for the future climate governance for 2015 and beyond. The final chapter explores applicability of theSummary: 'agency with and beyond the state' model to other sectors and to climate governance as a whole.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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JZ2-6530QC902.8-903. (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=2094736 Available EBC2094736

Intro -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Acronyms -- 1 Introduction -- Abstract -- 1.1 Transformation of Business Towards Sustainability -- 1.2 Automobile Industry and Global Climate Change -- 1.3 Research Puzzle and Hypothesis: Regulatory Convergence of Fuel Economy Regulation -- 1.4 Research Objectives: Revealing the Dynamics of Cars and CO2 -- References -- 2 Business Actors in Global Environmental Governance -- Abstract -- 2.1 Business Actors in Global Environmental Governance: A Classification of Business Involvement -- 2.2 Existing Studies: Varieties of Capitalism and Environmental Policy-Making -- 2.3 A Constructivist Perspective on Business Actors and Environmental Governance -- 2.4 Automobile Industry in Global Climate Governance: `Agency with and Beyond the States' -- References -- 3 Construction of European Fuel Economy Regulations for Passenger Cars -- Abstract -- 3.1 Introduction: EU as a Normative Power -- 3.2 The Formative Years: The Early 1990s -- 3.3 The Appearance of the 120 g/km Target: The Late 1990s -- 3.4 EU-Industry Voluntary Target: 1998--2006 -- 3.5 Critical Juncture: 2007 -- 3.6 Target for 2015 and Beyond -- Commission Consultation Process -- Discussion in the European Parliament -- Discussion in the Council of Ministers -- Final Outcome -- Target for Beyond 2015: Legalizing 95 g/km Target -- 3.7 Summary -- References -- 4 Construction of Japanese Fuel Economy Regulations for Passenger Cars -- Abstract -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The Brief History of the Japanese Fuel Economy Regulation: Mid-1970s---Late 1990s -- 4.3 Impacts from the Regulation Abroad -- 4.4 Critical Juncture: 2007 -- 4.5 Target for Beyond 2015 -- 4.6 Summary -- References -- 5 Construction of the US Fuel Economy Regulations for Passenger Cars -- Abstract -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Formative Years: 1970s.

5.3 Stagnation of the CAFE Standards: Mid-1980s -- 5.4 Critical Juncture: Massachusetts v. EPA (2007) -- 5.5 The 2007 Energy Security and Independence Act -- 5.6 Target for 2015 and Beyond -- 5.7 Summary -- References -- 6 Comparative Assessment -- Abstract -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Motive of the Regulation -- 6.3 Importance of Competitiveness Issue in Enhancing Regulations -- 6.4 Decision-Making Process -- 6.5 The Critical Juncture and the Role of Non-state Actors -- 6.6 Implications for 2015 and Beyond -- Implication to Regulatory Convergence for Heavy Duty Vehicles -- `Race to the Top', not `Race to the Bottom' -- References -- 7 Conclusion -- Abstract -- 7.1 Answering the Research Questions: Business Competition and Environmental Policy-Makings -- 7.2 Theoretical Contributions -- Beyond the `Variety of Capitalism' -- Constructing Constructivist Theory: The Regulatory Convergence Is What Competition Make of It -- 7.3 Applicability of `Agency Within and Beyond the State' Model of Regulatory Convergence to Environmental Policies -- 7.4 Future Tasks -- References -- Index.

This book reveals the mechanisms underlying the convergence of car fuel economy regulations in Europe, Japan and the US by drawing upon a constructivist theory of International Relations and law that focuses on business competition and environmental regulations. It offers new understanding of the topic of cars and an issue of climate change, discussing the emerging phenomenon of convergence of fuel economy regulations; addressing the role of business actors in pushing for climate change action; proposing the new model of agency with and beyond states; and providing insightful case studies from Europe, Japan and the US. The opening chapter reviews the automobile industry and global climate change, providing a background for the discussion to follow. Chapter 2, Business Actors and Global Environmental Governance, grounds the discussion in the field of environmental governance. The third chapter is a case study examining the construction and timing of the European Union's climate policies for automobile CO2 emissions, discussing the underlying factors and the actors influencing the policies. The following chapter argues that Japan adopted its stringent fuel economy regulations primarily because of industry competitiveness, motivated by stringent environmental regulations in export markets and encouraged by a tradition of 'co-regulation' and 'corporatism' to enhance the regulations. Chapter 5 asks why the US, the first country to introduce fuel economy regulations, spent two decades in regulatory stagnation, and discusses how recent US fuel economy regulations came to converge with Japanese and European standards. Chapter 6 compares, contrasts and analyzes fuel economy regulations among the three case studies and identifies policy implications for the future climate governance for 2015 and beyond. The final chapter explores applicability of the

'agency with and beyond the state' model to other sectors and to climate governance as a whole.

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