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Race on the brain : what implicit bias gets wrong about the struggle for racial justice / Jonathan Kahn.

By: Kahn, Jonathan, 1958- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2018]Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (291 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231545389; 023154538X.Subject(s): Discrimination in criminal justice administration -- United States | Discrimination in justice administration -- United States | Racism -- Psychological aspects | Racism -- United States | Discrimination -- Law and legislation -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Race on the brain.DDC classification: 364.3/400973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: rethinking implicit bias: the limits to science as a tool of racial justice -- Defining and measuring implicit bias -- The uptake of implicit social cognition by the legal academy -- Accepting conservative frames: time, color-blindness, diversity, and intent -- Behavioral realism in action -- Deracinating the legal subject -- Obscuring power -- Recreational antiracism and the power of positive nudging -- Seeking a technical fix to racism -- Biologizing racism: the ultimate technical fix -- Conclusion: contesting the common sense of racism.
Summary: Of the many obstacles to racial justice in America, none has received more recent attention than the one that lurks in our subconscious. As social movements and policing scandals have shown how far from being "postracial" we are, the concept of implicit bias has taken center stage in national conversation about race. Millions of Americans have taken online tests purporting to show the deep, invisible roots of their prejudice. When a recent Oxford study claimed to have found a drug that reduced implicit bias, it was only the starkest example of a pervasive trend. But what do we risk when we seek the simplicity of a technological diagnosis-and solution-for racism? What do we miss when we locate racism in our biology and our brains rather than in our history and our social practices? In Race on the Brain, Jonathan Kahn argues that implicit bias has grown into a master narrative of race relations-one with profound if unintended negative consequences for law, science, and society. He emphasizes its limitations, arguing that while useful as a tool to understand particular types of behavior, it is only one among the various tools available to policymakers. An uncritical embrace of implicit bias, to the exclusion of power relations and structural racism, undermines civic responsibility for addressing the problem by turning it over to experts. Technological interventions, including many tests for implicit bias, are premised on a color-blind ideal and run the risk of erasing history, denying present reality, and obscuring accountability.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HV9950 .K34 2018 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/kahn18424 Available on1011630548

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: rethinking implicit bias: the limits to science as a tool of racial justice -- Defining and measuring implicit bias -- The uptake of implicit social cognition by the legal academy -- Accepting conservative frames: time, color-blindness, diversity, and intent -- Behavioral realism in action -- Deracinating the legal subject -- Obscuring power -- Recreational antiracism and the power of positive nudging -- Seeking a technical fix to racism -- Biologizing racism: the ultimate technical fix -- Conclusion: contesting the common sense of racism.

Of the many obstacles to racial justice in America, none has received more recent attention than the one that lurks in our subconscious. As social movements and policing scandals have shown how far from being "postracial" we are, the concept of implicit bias has taken center stage in national conversation about race. Millions of Americans have taken online tests purporting to show the deep, invisible roots of their prejudice. When a recent Oxford study claimed to have found a drug that reduced implicit bias, it was only the starkest example of a pervasive trend. But what do we risk when we seek the simplicity of a technological diagnosis-and solution-for racism? What do we miss when we locate racism in our biology and our brains rather than in our history and our social practices? In Race on the Brain, Jonathan Kahn argues that implicit bias has grown into a master narrative of race relations-one with profound if unintended negative consequences for law, science, and society. He emphasizes its limitations, arguing that while useful as a tool to understand particular types of behavior, it is only one among the various tools available to policymakers. An uncritical embrace of implicit bias, to the exclusion of power relations and structural racism, undermines civic responsibility for addressing the problem by turning it over to experts. Technological interventions, including many tests for implicit bias, are premised on a color-blind ideal and run the risk of erasing history, denying present reality, and obscuring accountability.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

To identify and address America's persistent racial inequality and injustice, we must first reconsider how we understand racism and how it affects our actions, argues Kahn (Mitchell Hamline Univ. Sch. of Law; Race in a Bottle). In nine chapters, an introduction, and a conclusion, the author emphasizes how contemporary American society thinks and talks about racism, deploying legal and scientific technologies to address racism, and create context for progress on racial justice. Focusing particularly on the concept of "implicit bias," which has become central to how law, science, and society have come to treat the nature of racism, Kahn offers detailed correctives. He explains the rising notion that pervasive biases and negative associations that constitute racism reside outside the realm of personal awareness and foster a denial of history. He also shows that "implicit social cognition" mistakenly suggests there is an easy way to fight racism. VERDICT Kahn's important and masterly work deserves close reading and broad discussion among practitioners and students of law and public policy, but even more so among those interested in promoting racial justice.-Thomas J. Davis, Arizona State Univ., Tempe © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jonathan Kahn is the James E. Kelley Chair in Tort Law and professor of law at Mitchell Hamline School of Law. He is also the author of Race in a Bottle: The Story of BiDil and Racialized Medicine in a Post-Genomic Age (Columbia, 2013).

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