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Balkan Legacies of the Great War : The Past Is Never Dead.

By: Anastasakis, Othon.
Contributor(s): Madden, David | Roberts, Elizabeth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.St Antony's Ser: Publisher: London : Palgrave Macmillan Limited, 2015Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (99 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781137564146.Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918--InfluenceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Balkan Legacies of the Great War : The Past Is Never DeadDDC classification: 940.3/1409496 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Notes on Contributors -- 1 Introduction: The Past is Never Dead ... -- 2 Too Much History and Too Many Neighbours: Europe and the Balkans before 1914 -- 3 The Black Hand and the Sarajevo Conspiracy -- 4 The Contrasting Legacies of the South Slav Question -- 5 Was the First World War the Turning Point at Which Bulgarian History Failed to Turn? -- 6 World War I and the Fall of the Ottomans: Consequences for South East Europe -- 7 Unwanted Legacies: Greece and the Great War -- 8 Epilogue: ... It Is Not Even Past!.
Summary: This is a rich yet succinct account of the consequences of the Great War for the region which ignited it. It explores the collapse of Empires, the birth of Turkey and Yugoslavia, Greece as both victor and loser, Bulgaria's humiliating defeat; bitter memories, forced migrations, territorial implications and collective national amnesias.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D25-D25.9D900-D2027D (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4720678 Available EBC4720678

Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Notes on Contributors -- 1 Introduction: The Past is Never Dead ... -- 2 Too Much History and Too Many Neighbours: Europe and the Balkans before 1914 -- 3 The Black Hand and the Sarajevo Conspiracy -- 4 The Contrasting Legacies of the South Slav Question -- 5 Was the First World War the Turning Point at Which Bulgarian History Failed to Turn? -- 6 World War I and the Fall of the Ottomans: Consequences for South East Europe -- 7 Unwanted Legacies: Greece and the Great War -- 8 Epilogue: ... It Is Not Even Past!.

This is a rich yet succinct account of the consequences of the Great War for the region which ignited it. It explores the collapse of Empires, the birth of Turkey and Yugoslavia, Greece as both victor and loser, Bulgaria's humiliating defeat; bitter memories, forced migrations, territorial implications and collective national amnesias.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Othon Anastasakis is Director of South East European Studies and Director of the European Studies Centre, St Antony's College (2012-2015), and Senior Research Fellow at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford, UK. He has published books and articles on the politics, history and political economy of South East Europe and its relations with the European Union.David Madden is a former Ambassador and Senior Member of St Antony's College, University of Oxford, UK. He has extensive experience of working in places on the brink of break-up (Yugoslavia in the 1980s), those divided (Berlin in the 1970s, Cyprus, Bosnia and Herzegovina), and those where there are regional tensions.Elizabeth Roberts is a former Australian diplomat and has, after living in the former Yugoslavia for four years, become a Balkan scholar over the last twenty years, lecturing and publishing a number of articles and two books, Realm of the Black Mountain: A History of Montenegro (2007) and The Sandzak: A History (co-authored with Kenneth Morrison), in 2013.</p>

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