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When women didn't count : the chronic mismeasure and marginalization of American women in federal statistics / Robert Lopresti.

By: Lopresti, Robert [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Santa Barbara, California : Praeger, [2017]Description: xvii, 352 pages ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781440843686; 1440843686.Subject(s): United States -- Statistics -- History | Women -- United States -- Statistics -- History | Government questionnaires -- United States -- History | United States -- Statistical services -- History | Sex discrimination -- United States -- History | Government questionnaires | Sex discrimination | Statistical services | Statistics | Women -- Statistics | United StatesGenre/Form: History.Additional physical formats: Online version:: When women didn't count.DDC classification: 305.402/1
Contents:
Why care about government statistics?. Introduction ; Statistical system of the United States -- Demographics. Population and age ; Marriage, divorce, and cohabitation ; Motherhood ; Single mothers -- Women at home. Heads of household, heads of family ; Housewives, homemakers, and housekeepers -- Concepts of employment. "Occupations suitable for women" ; "Gainful Employment" ; Income ; Unemployment during the Great Depression -- Women at work. The Bureau of Labor statistics and the Women's Bureau ; Employment ; Women factory workers ; "Farm females" ; Women business owners, women-owned businesses -- Women and health. Nonreproductive health issues ; Contraception ; Abortion -- Women and the law. Women as criminals ; Prostitution ; Women as crime victims ; Rape -- Women at war. Rosie the Riveter: civilian women during the World Wars ; Women in the military -- Conclusion.
Summary: Erroneous government-generated "data" is more problematic than it would appear. This book demonstrates how women's history has consistently been hidden and distorted by 200 years of official government statistics.Summary: Much of women's history has been hidden and filtered through unrealistic expectations and assumptions. Because U.S. government data about women's lives and occupations has been significantly inaccurate, these misrepresentations in statistical information have shaped the reality of women's lives. They also affect men and society as a whole: these numbers influence our investments, our property values, our representation in Congress, and even how we see our place in society. This book documents how U.S. federal government statistics have served to reveal and conceal facts about women in the United States. It reaches back to the late 1800s, when the U.S. Census Bureau first listed women's occupations, and forward to the present, when the U.S. government relies on nonprofit groups for statistics on abortion. Objective and accurate, When Women Didn't Count isn't focused on numbers and census results as much as on recognizing problems in data, exposing the hidden facets of government data, and using critical thinking when considering all seemingly authoritative sources. Readers will contemplate how the government decided that a "farmer's wife" could be a farmer, how the ongoing battle over abortion has been reflected in the numbers the government is allowed to keep and publish, the consequences of the Census Bureau "correcting" reports of women in unusual occupations in 1920, and why the official count of women-owned businesses dropped 20 percent in 1997. -- from dust jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HA214 .L67 2017 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002344588

Includes bibliographical references (pages 255-340) and index.

Why care about government statistics?. Introduction ; Statistical system of the United States -- Demographics. Population and age ; Marriage, divorce, and cohabitation ; Motherhood ; Single mothers -- Women at home. Heads of household, heads of family ; Housewives, homemakers, and housekeepers -- Concepts of employment. "Occupations suitable for women" ; "Gainful Employment" ; Income ; Unemployment during the Great Depression -- Women at work. The Bureau of Labor statistics and the Women's Bureau ; Employment ; Women factory workers ; "Farm females" ; Women business owners, women-owned businesses -- Women and health. Nonreproductive health issues ; Contraception ; Abortion -- Women and the law. Women as criminals ; Prostitution ; Women as crime victims ; Rape -- Women at war. Rosie the Riveter: civilian women during the World Wars ; Women in the military -- Conclusion.

Erroneous government-generated "data" is more problematic than it would appear. This book demonstrates how women's history has consistently been hidden and distorted by 200 years of official government statistics.

Much of women's history has been hidden and filtered through unrealistic expectations and assumptions. Because U.S. government data about women's lives and occupations has been significantly inaccurate, these misrepresentations in statistical information have shaped the reality of women's lives. They also affect men and society as a whole: these numbers influence our investments, our property values, our representation in Congress, and even how we see our place in society. This book documents how U.S. federal government statistics have served to reveal and conceal facts about women in the United States. It reaches back to the late 1800s, when the U.S. Census Bureau first listed women's occupations, and forward to the present, when the U.S. government relies on nonprofit groups for statistics on abortion. Objective and accurate, When Women Didn't Count isn't focused on numbers and census results as much as on recognizing problems in data, exposing the hidden facets of government data, and using critical thinking when considering all seemingly authoritative sources. Readers will contemplate how the government decided that a "farmer's wife" could be a farmer, how the ongoing battle over abortion has been reflected in the numbers the government is allowed to keep and publish, the consequences of the Census Bureau "correcting" reports of women in unusual occupations in 1920, and why the official count of women-owned businesses dropped 20 percent in 1997. -- from dust jacket.

dust jacket housed 20171109 pda MCR-S

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Readers looking for a compilation of numbers regarding US women, or analysis of the numbers themselves, are unlikely to find it here. The author seeks instead to provide, and does so quite compellingly, an examination of why certain questions were asked, which in turn then generated those numbers, and the ways in which those questions changed over time, thus shaping the representation of women within this official historical record. Lopresti (government information librarian, Western Washington Univ.) argues that it was as much changing the perceived notions of women over time as it was grounding in actual changes in the day-to-day world, such as changes in technology, which drove the questions census takers asked every ten years. From a US women's labor historian's point of view, it is especially intriguing to see how the author clarifies the impact of changing occupations and new technologies and how they affected women at work, and the need to be able to provide data to effect social change. Discussion of the impact of race on the census process could have been expanded, and perhaps will be in a future volume. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Kathleen Banks Nutter, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Robert Lopresti is a professor at Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA. He has been a government information librarian for almost 40 years.</p>

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