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Carolina clay : the life and legend of the slave potter Dave / Leonard Todd.

By: Todd, Leonard.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : W.W. Norton, ©2008Edition: 1st ed.Description: 317 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780393058567; 0393058565.Subject(s): Dave, active 1834-1864 | Geschichte 1834-1864 | 1800-1899 | African American potters -- South Carolina -- Edgefield -- Biography | Slaves -- South Carolina -- Edgefield -- Biography | Potters -- South Carolina -- Edgefield -- Biography | African American artists -- South Carolina -- Edgefield -- Biography | African American poets -- South Carolina -- Edgefield -- Biography | African American pottery -- South Carolina -- Edgefield -- History -- 19th century | Stoneware -- South Carolina -- Edgefield -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- South Carolina -- Edgefield -- History -- 19th century | African American artists | African American potters | African American pottery | Potters | Slavery | Slaves | Stoneware | Potters -- South Carolina | African Americans -- South Carolina -- Biography | African American potters -- Biography | Slaves -- Edgefield (S.C.) -- Biography | Potters -- Edgefield (S.C.) -- Biography | African American artists -- Biography | African American poets -- Biography | African American pottery -- History | Pottery -- History | Slavery -- Edgefield (S.C.) -- History | Edgefield (S.C.) -- Biography | South Carolina -- Edgefield | United States, South Carolina -- Occupations | United States, South Carolina -- Minorities -- BiographyGenre/Form: Biography. | History. | Nonfiction.DDC classification: 738.092 | B
Contents:
Purchases Discoveries Words Fire-Eaters Trips Sermons Families Murders Jars Cousins Battles Reunions Votes Shirts Echoes Inscriptions
Review: "He is known today, as he was then, only as Dave. His jugs and storage jars were everyday items, but because of their beauty and sometimes massive size they are now highly sought after by collectors. Born about 1801, Dave was taught to turn pots in Edgefield, South Carolina, the center of alkaline-glazed pottery production. He also learned to read and write, in spite of South Carolina's long-standing fear of slave literacy. Even when the state made it a crime to teach a slave to write, Dave signed his pots and inscribed many of them with poems. Though his verses spoke simply of his daily experience, they were nevertheless powerful statements. He countered the slavery system not by writing words of protest but by daring to write at all. We know of no other slave artist who put his name on his work." "When Leonard Todd discovered that his family had owned Dave, he moved from Manhattan to Edgefield, where his ancestors had established the first potteries in the area. Todd studied each of Dave's poems for biographical clues, which he pieced together with local records and family letters to create this moving and dramatic chronicle of Dave's life - a story of creative triumph in the midst of oppression. Many of Dave's astounding jars are found now in America's finest museums, including the Smithsonian Institution, the Charleston Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
NK4210.D247 T63 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002346252

Includes bibliographical references (pages 291-294) and index.

Chapter I Purchases 11 -- Chapter II Discoveries 27 -- Chapter III Words 39 -- Chapter IV Fire-Eaters 55 -- Chapter V Trips 67 -- Chapter VI Sermons 77 -- Chapter VII Families 89 -- Chapter VIII Murders 103 -- Chapter IX Jars 115 -- Chapter X Cousins 131 -- Chapter XI Battles 141 -- Chapter XII Reunions 159 -- Chapter XIII Votes 175 -- Chapter XIV Shirts 189 -- Chapter XV Echoes 203 -- Inscriptions 229.

"He is known today, as he was then, only as Dave. His jugs and storage jars were everyday items, but because of their beauty and sometimes massive size they are now highly sought after by collectors. Born about 1801, Dave was taught to turn pots in Edgefield, South Carolina, the center of alkaline-glazed pottery production. He also learned to read and write, in spite of South Carolina's long-standing fear of slave literacy. Even when the state made it a crime to teach a slave to write, Dave signed his pots and inscribed many of them with poems. Though his verses spoke simply of his daily experience, they were nevertheless powerful statements. He countered the slavery system not by writing words of protest but by daring to write at all. We know of no other slave artist who put his name on his work." "When Leonard Todd discovered that his family had owned Dave, he moved from Manhattan to Edgefield, where his ancestors had established the first potteries in the area. Todd studied each of Dave's poems for biographical clues, which he pieced together with local records and family letters to create this moving and dramatic chronicle of Dave's life - a story of creative triumph in the midst of oppression. Many of Dave's astounding jars are found now in America's finest museums, including the Smithsonian Institution, the Charleston Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Adult/High School-Imagine reading an article in the New York Times about an obscure but talented South Carolina potter named Dave, who was a slave for most of his life, only to learn that your great-great-grandfather had owned him. Todd did just that and then began an involved, lengthy investigation to uncover the truth of his family's past. His book reads like a combination of Antiques Roadshow and History Detectives. Piecing together information gathered from local records, newspapers, family letters, and remaining pottery complete with encrypted verse, the author presents a window into what life was like for a literate slave who eventually became a free man. Photos give glimpses of the pottery. This book provides a real feel for a slave's life and experience. Reading about how often Dave was sold and had to restart his family, no matter how thoughtful his master believed he was being to him, along with the countless other indignities and injuries he suffered, will make a lasting impression on teens.-Joanne Ligamari, Twin Rivers United School District, Sacramento, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Leonard Todd , the author of three previous books, has written for Travel & Leisure and Cosmopolitan, among other magazines. He is a graduate of the Yale School of Art and Architecture and works as a graphic designer. He lives in Edgefield, South Carolina.

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