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Hitler's American Model : The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law.

By: Whitman, James Q.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (221 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400884636.Subject(s): Jews--Legal status, laws, etc.--Germany--HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Hitler's American Model : The United States and the Making of Nazi Race LawDDC classification: 327.43073090429999 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- CONTENTS -- A Note on Translations -- Introduction -- CHAPTER 1 Making Nazi Flags and Nazi Citizens -- The First Nuremberg Law: Of New York Jews and Nazi Flags -- The Second Nuremberg Law: Making Nazi Citizens -- America: The Global Leader in Racist Immigration Law -- American Second-Class Citizenship -- The Nazis Pick Up the Thread -- Toward the Citizenship Law: Nazi Politics in the Early 1930s -- The Nazis Look to American Second-Class Citizenship -- Conclusion -- CHAPTER 2 Protecting Nazi Blood and Nazi Honor -- Toward the Blood Law: Battles in the Streets and the Ministries -- Battles in the Streets: The Call for "Unambiguous Laws" -- Battles in the Ministries: The Prussian Memorandum and the American Example -- Conservative Juristic Resistance: Gürtner and Lösener -- The Meeting of June 5, 1934 -- The Sources of Nazi Knowledge of American Law -- Evaluating American Influence -- Defining "Mongrels": The One-Drop Rule and the Limits of American Influence -- CONCLUSION America through Nazi Eyes -- America's Place in the Global History of Racism -- Nazism and American Legal Culture -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Suggestions for Further Reading -- Index.
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DD247.H5.W458 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4813112 Available EBC4813112

Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- CONTENTS -- A Note on Translations -- Introduction -- CHAPTER 1 Making Nazi Flags and Nazi Citizens -- The First Nuremberg Law: Of New York Jews and Nazi Flags -- The Second Nuremberg Law: Making Nazi Citizens -- America: The Global Leader in Racist Immigration Law -- American Second-Class Citizenship -- The Nazis Pick Up the Thread -- Toward the Citizenship Law: Nazi Politics in the Early 1930s -- The Nazis Look to American Second-Class Citizenship -- Conclusion -- CHAPTER 2 Protecting Nazi Blood and Nazi Honor -- Toward the Blood Law: Battles in the Streets and the Ministries -- Battles in the Streets: The Call for "Unambiguous Laws" -- Battles in the Ministries: The Prussian Memorandum and the American Example -- Conservative Juristic Resistance: Gürtner and Lösener -- The Meeting of June 5, 1934 -- The Sources of Nazi Knowledge of American Law -- Evaluating American Influence -- Defining "Mongrels": The One-Drop Rule and the Limits of American Influence -- CONCLUSION America through Nazi Eyes -- America's Place in the Global History of Racism -- Nazism and American Legal Culture -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Suggestions for Further Reading -- Index.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Whitman (comparative and foreign law, Yale Law School) has written a sober and sobering study of the influence of US race laws and practices on those of Hitler's Third Reich. Jim Crow, racially defined immigration laws, and other overt and covert racist practices took many lives in the US and damaged many more, but it did not lead to systematic mass murder. For this reason, most previous treatments of this subject tend to write off US racism as some sort of template for Germany's. But Whitman argues persuasively that influence takes many forms. He demonstrates with abundant evidence that Nazi lawyers were acutely aware of US precedents, that they paid studious attention to national and state laws regarding voting, immigration, and segregation. There was a certain guarded admiration for US "first steps" toward establishing the Nordic supremacy that Germany would carry to its logical conclusion. But Whitman has not written a sensational exposé. He continually cautions readers not to leap to overblown conclusions about the direct influence of US precedents. The Nazis were essentially quite condescending about US flaws, such as Jews exercising far too much power, and the egalitarian elements of the Constitution. That Nazi Germany nonetheless drew significant encouragement from US practices seems undeniable. An indispensable book scrupulously written. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. --Richard S. Levy, University of Illinois at Chicago

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James Q. Whitman is the Ford Foundation Professor of Comparative and Foreign Law at Yale Law School. His books include Harsh Justice , The Origins of Reasonable Doubt , and The Verdict of Battle . He lives in New York City.

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