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Fly girls : how five daring women defied all odds and made aviation history / Keith O'Brien.

By: O'Brien, Keith, 1973- [author.].
Material type: TextTextDescription: xiv, 338 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781328876645; 1328876640.Subject(s): Klingensmith, Florence Gunderson, 1904-1933 | Elder, Ruth, 1902-1977 | Earhart, Amelia, 1897-1937 | Nichols, Ruth, 1901-1960 | Thaden, Louise McPhetridge, 1905-1979 | Bendix Trophy Race (1936) | Airplane racing -- United States | Women air pilots -- United States -- Biography | Air shows -- United States -- History | Air shows | Women air pilots | HISTORY -- United States -- 20th Century | HISTORY -- Women | SPORTS & RECREATION -- Air Sports | Women air pilots -- United States -- Biography | Air shows -- United States -- History | Air shows -- United States -- History | United StatesGenre/Form: Biography. | History. | Biographies. | Sports writing. | Biographies.Additional physical formats: Online version:: Fly girls.DDC classification: 629.13092/520973
Contents:
The miracle of Wichita -- Devotedly, Ruth -- Real and natural, every inch -- The fortune of the air -- The fairest of the brave and the bravest of the fair -- Flying salesgirls -- The right sort of girl -- City of destiny -- If this is to be a derby -- There is only one Cleveland -- Good eggs -- Mr. Putnam and me -- Law of fate -- Give a girl credit -- Grudge flight -- Spetakkel -- All things being equal -- That's what I think of wives flying -- They'll be in our hair -- Playing hunches -- A woman couldn't win -- The top of the hill.
Summary: Between the world wars, no sport was more popular, or more dangerous, than airplane racing. Thousands of fans flocked to multi-day events, and cities vied with one another to host them. The pilots themselves were hailed as dashing heroes who cheerfully stared death in the face. Well, the men were hailed. Female pilots were more often ridiculed than praised for what the press portrayed as silly efforts to horn in on a manly, and deadly, pursuit. Keith O'Brien recounts how a cadre of women banded together to break the original glass ceiling: the entrenched prejudice that conspired to keep them out of the sky. O'Brien weaves together the stories of five remarkable women: Florence Klingensmith, a high-school dropout who worked for a dry cleaner in Fargo, North Dakota; Ruth Elder, an Alabama divorcee; Amelia Earhart, the most famous, but not necessarily the most skilled; Ruth Nichols, who chafed at the constraints of her blue-blood family's expectations; and Louise Thaden, the mother of two young kids who got her start selling coal in Wichita. Together, they fought for the chance to race against the men -- and in 1936, one of them would triumph in the toughest race of all.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
TL539 .F549 2018 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002346880

"An Eamon Dolan Book."

Includes bibliographical references (pages 270-327) and index.

The miracle of Wichita -- Devotedly, Ruth -- Real and natural, every inch -- The fortune of the air -- The fairest of the brave and the bravest of the fair -- Flying salesgirls -- The right sort of girl -- City of destiny -- If this is to be a derby -- There is only one Cleveland -- Good eggs -- Mr. Putnam and me -- Law of fate -- Give a girl credit -- Grudge flight -- Spetakkel -- All things being equal -- That's what I think of wives flying -- They'll be in our hair -- Playing hunches -- A woman couldn't win -- The top of the hill.

Between the world wars, no sport was more popular, or more dangerous, than airplane racing. Thousands of fans flocked to multi-day events, and cities vied with one another to host them. The pilots themselves were hailed as dashing heroes who cheerfully stared death in the face. Well, the men were hailed. Female pilots were more often ridiculed than praised for what the press portrayed as silly efforts to horn in on a manly, and deadly, pursuit. Keith O'Brien recounts how a cadre of women banded together to break the original glass ceiling: the entrenched prejudice that conspired to keep them out of the sky. O'Brien weaves together the stories of five remarkable women: Florence Klingensmith, a high-school dropout who worked for a dry cleaner in Fargo, North Dakota; Ruth Elder, an Alabama divorcee; Amelia Earhart, the most famous, but not necessarily the most skilled; Ruth Nichols, who chafed at the constraints of her blue-blood family's expectations; and Louise Thaden, the mother of two young kids who got her start selling coal in Wichita. Together, they fought for the chance to race against the men -- and in 1936, one of them would triumph in the toughest race of all.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In the 1920s and 1930s, the nation was gripped by air race fever. These extremely dangerous races, both short distance and cross country, drew tens of thousands of spectators, even during the Great Depression. While the 19th Amendment granted American women the right to vote in 1920, accomplished aviators Amelia Earhart, Ruth Nichols, Louise Thaden, Ruth Elder, and Florence Klingensmith knew earning this right was no true guarantee of gender equality. These passionate female aviators refused to be marginalized to the "Powder Puff Derby" and waged PR campaigns to be included in races with the men. O'Brien (Catching the Sky) portrays the plight of the "fly girls," as they were dismissively called, as they fought for the same opportunities as men in the fledgling aviation industry. Despite the number of subjects and events covered, O'Brien's narrative flows smoothly, and Erin Bennett deftly switches pace as she relates the compelling backgrounds of the women, the excitement of the races, and the tragedy that often followed. Despite the horror of the numerous crashes, this story is ultimately an inspiring tribute to these brave females who refused to accept the "you don't belong here" rebuke from a sneering patriarchal society. VERDICT This thrilling title should have wide appeal, especially to those interested in gender equality, history, and aviation. ["Highly recommended for readers with an interest in aviation history, women's history, cultural history, and 20th-century history": LJ 6/15/18 starred review of the Houghton Harcourt hc.]-Beth Farrell, Cleveland State Univ. Law Lib. © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Keith O'Brien is a journalist and writer, born in 1973 and based in New Hampshire. He is a former reporter for the Boston Globe. He contributes to National Public Radio and Politico. His work appears in the New York Times and This American Life. He is the author of Fly Girls: How Five Daring Women Defied All Odds and Made Aviation History, published August 2018. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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