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Dislocating the Orient : British Maps and the Making of the Middle East, 1854-1921.

By: Foliard, Daniel.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago, IL : University of Chicago Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (343 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780226451473.Subject(s): Middle East - NameGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Dislocating the Orient : British Maps and the Making of the Middle East, 1854-1921DDC classification: 327.4105609/034 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Introduction -- Part I. From Sebastopol to Suez (1854-1869) -- 1. The Mid-Victorian Perspective: A Fragmented East -- 2. Labeling the East -- 3. Maps for the Masses? -- Part II. A Shifting East in the Age of High Imperialism (1870-1895) -- 4. Oriental Designs -- 5. Virtual Travel in the Age of High Imperialism -- Part III. The Fabrication of the Middle East (1895-1921) -- 6. Seeing Red? -- 7. Enter Middle East -- 8. Falling Into Places -- General Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Notes on Methodology and Select Bibliography -- Index.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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DA47 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4830501 Available EBC4830501

Intro -- Contents -- Introduction -- Part I. From Sebastopol to Suez (1854-1869) -- 1. The Mid-Victorian Perspective: A Fragmented East -- 2. Labeling the East -- 3. Maps for the Masses? -- Part II. A Shifting East in the Age of High Imperialism (1870-1895) -- 4. Oriental Designs -- 5. Virtual Travel in the Age of High Imperialism -- Part III. The Fabrication of the Middle East (1895-1921) -- 6. Seeing Red? -- 7. Enter Middle East -- 8. Falling Into Places -- General Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Notes on Methodology and Select Bibliography -- Index.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Foliard (Paris Ouest Univ.) delves into this question: did imperialism follow the map? His work offers no definitive answer but rather illuminates the haphazard way agents of British imperialism engaged in cartography, especially as it related to the Middle East. Middle East was an amorphous label, an imperial imposition of uncertain authorship applied to the region between the Nile River and India. In Foliard's analysis, the efforts of cartographers reflected the competing interests of the War Office, the Foreign Office, the government of India, and numerous scientific and missionary societies. The sole unifying principle appeared to be the desire to preserve and extend British influence in the region while thwarting Russian ambitions. British exploitation of oil resources in Persia and Mesopotamia as well as Arab tribal politics complicated this endeavor. Interestingly, Foliard holds that India owned the resources to produce the superior cartographic product. The knowledge thereby obtained gave the colony an advantage in its contentions with London. The author notes that maps also played a key role in generating popular support for imperialism, as technological advances in printing (especially the halftone process) enabled the inclusion of color and fine detail and allowed for wide circulation of the product. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Steven L Smith, California State University, Fullerton

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