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Bioarchaeological Analyses and Bodies : New Ways of Knowing Anatomical and Archaeological Skeletal Collections.

By: Stone, Pamela K.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Bioarchaeology and Social Theory Ser: Publisher: Cham : Springer, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (253 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319711140.Subject(s): Forensic anthropology | Human remains (Archaeology) | Social archaeologyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Bioarchaeological Analyses and Bodies : New Ways of Knowing Anatomical and Archaeological Skeletal CollectionsDDC classification: 930.1 LOC classification: CC1-960GN49-GN298Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Dedication -- Foreword -- Contents -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- New Ways of Knowing -- Why a Bioarchaeology Lens? -- Themes of the Text -- References -- Part I: Anatomical (Medical) Collections -- Chapter 2: "Whatever Was Once Associated with him, Continues to Bear his Stamp": Articulating and Dissecting George S. Huntington and His Anatomical Collection -- Introduction -- The Collection -- Human Variation -- Medicine, Dissection, and Bodies: A Necessary Bond -- Case Study: Lizzie's Extended Life Course -- (Re)Articulating Huntington and His Collection -- References -- Chapter 3: Anatomical Collections as the Anthropological Other: Some Considerations -- Introduction -- Disclaimer/Position Statement -- Context for the Discussion -- The W. Montague Cobb Skeletal Collection -- Recent Studies of the Cobb Skeletal Collection -- Anatomical Remains and Osteological Subject Making -- Anatomical Remains as the Raw Material of Scientific Knowledge Production -- Conclusions and Considerations -- References -- Chapter 4: More Than the Sum Total of Their Parts: Restoring Identity by Recombining a Skeletal Collection with Its Texts -- Introduction -- Historical Background -- Measuring Residential Segregation in the Huntington Collection -- Indices of Segregation -- Statistical Analysis -- Results -- Index of Dissimilarity for the City of New York -- Interaction Index for the City of New York -- Isolation Index for the City of New York -- Effect of Tract Dissimilarity Value on the Number of Black Individuals Collected -- Effect of Tract Interaction Values for Black Residents on the Number of Black Individuals Collected -- Effect of Tract Isolation Values for Black Residents on the Number of Individuals Collected -- Effect of Tract Income on the Number of Black Individuals Collected.
Effect of Tract Income on the Number of White Individuals Collected -- Discussion -- References -- Chapter 5: At the Intersections of Race, Poverty, Gender, and Science: A Museum Mortuary for Twentieth Century Fetuses and Infants -- Introduction -- Bioarchaeology and Fetal and Infant Collection -- The Johns Hopkins Fetal Collection -- The Sociopolitical Value of Fetal and Infant Remains -- Capturing the "Normal" Fetus: Collection and Commodification -- Fetal and Infant Value Beyond Scientific Contributions -- The Axes of Gender, Poverty, and Race -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: Recovering the Lived Body from Bodies of Evidence: Interrogation of Diagnostic Criteria and Parameters for Disease Ecology Reconstructed from Skeletons Within Anatomical and Medical Anatomical Collections -- Introduction -- Background -- Acquired Syphilis -- Diagnostic Criteria -- Diagnostic Criteria for Syphilis -- Medical Anatomical Skeletal Collections -- Anatomical Collections -- The Embodied Effects of Poverty, Low Socioeconomic Status, and Lifetime Exposure to Physical and Psychosocial Stressors -- Discussion and Conclusion -- References -- Part II: Archaeological Collections -- Chapter 7: Lives Lost: What Burial Vault Studies Reveal About Eighteenth-Century Identities -- Introduction -- Background -- The Burial Vault -- Other Historical Burial Vault Studies -- The Human Remains -- Heavy Metals -- Stable Isotopes -- Mitochondrial DNA -- Naming the Past -- Discussion -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 8: 'A Mass of Crooked Alphabets': The Construction and Othering of Working Class Bodies in Industrial England -- Introduction -- Case Study 1: Phossy Jaw and Matchmaking -- Case Study 2: Pauper Apprentices - North Yorkshire -- Discussion: Industrialised Bodies -- Conclusion -- References.
Chapter 9: From Womb to Tomb? Disrupting the Narrative of the Reproductive Female Body -- Introduction -- Anthropology, Medicine, and Framing Difference -- From Womb to Tomb? -- Evolution and Birth -- The Obstetrical Dilemma -- Maternal Health -- Bioarchaeological Investigations -- Skeletal Analysis: Measuring the Risk of Pregnancy? -- Occupational and Reproductive Stress -- Understanding Task Differentiation Through Ethnoarchaeology and the Biological Consequences for Men and Women in Ancestral Pueblo Villages -- Maternal Mortality in the Past -- Gender Inequality, Not Reproduction -- New Models -- Conclusions -- References Cited -- Chapter 10: Mother, Laborer, Captive, and Leader: Reassessing the Various Roles that Females Held Among the Ancestral Pueblo in the American Southwest -- Introduction -- Collecting Indigenous Human Remains in the United States -- Early Skeletal Collections from the American Southwest -- Reanalyzing the Early Southwest Collections -- The Role of Females Among the Ancestral Pueblo -- Differences Between Foragers and Agriculturalists -- Methodological Approach -- Excavations: Room 33 at Pueblo Bonito, Kin Bineola, Black Mesa, and La Plata -- Chaco Canyon -- Chaco Phenomenon -- Pueblo Bonito: Room 33 -- Kin Bineola -- Black Mesa -- La Plata -- Recognizing Females: Mother, Laborer, Captive, and Leader -- Mothers -- Laborers -- Captives -- Leaders -- Discussion: The Complex Lives of Ancestral Pueblo Females -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 11: A Skull's Tale: From Middle Bronze Age Subject to Teaching Collection "Object" -- Constructing an Archaeological Subject: The "Warrior" from Middle Bronze Age Canaan -- Becoming a Teaching Collection "Object": Skull 901 AEH 66 -- Theorizing Subjects and Objects -- Re-subjectifying the Skull Through Teaching -- Conclusion -- References.
Chapter 12: Conclusion: Challenging the Narrative -- Expanding the Umbrella of Bioarchaeology -- Contextualization and a Critical Bioarchaeology -- Communicating Bioarchaeology -- Engaging with Anatomical Collections -- A Bioarchaeology of Anatomy Collections -- Self-reflection -- Parting Thoughts -- References -- Index.
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Intro -- Dedication -- Foreword -- Contents -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- New Ways of Knowing -- Why a Bioarchaeology Lens? -- Themes of the Text -- References -- Part I: Anatomical (Medical) Collections -- Chapter 2: "Whatever Was Once Associated with him, Continues to Bear his Stamp": Articulating and Dissecting George S. Huntington and His Anatomical Collection -- Introduction -- The Collection -- Human Variation -- Medicine, Dissection, and Bodies: A Necessary Bond -- Case Study: Lizzie's Extended Life Course -- (Re)Articulating Huntington and His Collection -- References -- Chapter 3: Anatomical Collections as the Anthropological Other: Some Considerations -- Introduction -- Disclaimer/Position Statement -- Context for the Discussion -- The W. Montague Cobb Skeletal Collection -- Recent Studies of the Cobb Skeletal Collection -- Anatomical Remains and Osteological Subject Making -- Anatomical Remains as the Raw Material of Scientific Knowledge Production -- Conclusions and Considerations -- References -- Chapter 4: More Than the Sum Total of Their Parts: Restoring Identity by Recombining a Skeletal Collection with Its Texts -- Introduction -- Historical Background -- Measuring Residential Segregation in the Huntington Collection -- Indices of Segregation -- Statistical Analysis -- Results -- Index of Dissimilarity for the City of New York -- Interaction Index for the City of New York -- Isolation Index for the City of New York -- Effect of Tract Dissimilarity Value on the Number of Black Individuals Collected -- Effect of Tract Interaction Values for Black Residents on the Number of Black Individuals Collected -- Effect of Tract Isolation Values for Black Residents on the Number of Individuals Collected -- Effect of Tract Income on the Number of Black Individuals Collected.

Effect of Tract Income on the Number of White Individuals Collected -- Discussion -- References -- Chapter 5: At the Intersections of Race, Poverty, Gender, and Science: A Museum Mortuary for Twentieth Century Fetuses and Infants -- Introduction -- Bioarchaeology and Fetal and Infant Collection -- The Johns Hopkins Fetal Collection -- The Sociopolitical Value of Fetal and Infant Remains -- Capturing the "Normal" Fetus: Collection and Commodification -- Fetal and Infant Value Beyond Scientific Contributions -- The Axes of Gender, Poverty, and Race -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: Recovering the Lived Body from Bodies of Evidence: Interrogation of Diagnostic Criteria and Parameters for Disease Ecology Reconstructed from Skeletons Within Anatomical and Medical Anatomical Collections -- Introduction -- Background -- Acquired Syphilis -- Diagnostic Criteria -- Diagnostic Criteria for Syphilis -- Medical Anatomical Skeletal Collections -- Anatomical Collections -- The Embodied Effects of Poverty, Low Socioeconomic Status, and Lifetime Exposure to Physical and Psychosocial Stressors -- Discussion and Conclusion -- References -- Part II: Archaeological Collections -- Chapter 7: Lives Lost: What Burial Vault Studies Reveal About Eighteenth-Century Identities -- Introduction -- Background -- The Burial Vault -- Other Historical Burial Vault Studies -- The Human Remains -- Heavy Metals -- Stable Isotopes -- Mitochondrial DNA -- Naming the Past -- Discussion -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 8: 'A Mass of Crooked Alphabets': The Construction and Othering of Working Class Bodies in Industrial England -- Introduction -- Case Study 1: Phossy Jaw and Matchmaking -- Case Study 2: Pauper Apprentices - North Yorkshire -- Discussion: Industrialised Bodies -- Conclusion -- References.

Chapter 9: From Womb to Tomb? Disrupting the Narrative of the Reproductive Female Body -- Introduction -- Anthropology, Medicine, and Framing Difference -- From Womb to Tomb? -- Evolution and Birth -- The Obstetrical Dilemma -- Maternal Health -- Bioarchaeological Investigations -- Skeletal Analysis: Measuring the Risk of Pregnancy? -- Occupational and Reproductive Stress -- Understanding Task Differentiation Through Ethnoarchaeology and the Biological Consequences for Men and Women in Ancestral Pueblo Villages -- Maternal Mortality in the Past -- Gender Inequality, Not Reproduction -- New Models -- Conclusions -- References Cited -- Chapter 10: Mother, Laborer, Captive, and Leader: Reassessing the Various Roles that Females Held Among the Ancestral Pueblo in the American Southwest -- Introduction -- Collecting Indigenous Human Remains in the United States -- Early Skeletal Collections from the American Southwest -- Reanalyzing the Early Southwest Collections -- The Role of Females Among the Ancestral Pueblo -- Differences Between Foragers and Agriculturalists -- Methodological Approach -- Excavations: Room 33 at Pueblo Bonito, Kin Bineola, Black Mesa, and La Plata -- Chaco Canyon -- Chaco Phenomenon -- Pueblo Bonito: Room 33 -- Kin Bineola -- Black Mesa -- La Plata -- Recognizing Females: Mother, Laborer, Captive, and Leader -- Mothers -- Laborers -- Captives -- Leaders -- Discussion: The Complex Lives of Ancestral Pueblo Females -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 11: A Skull's Tale: From Middle Bronze Age Subject to Teaching Collection "Object" -- Constructing an Archaeological Subject: The "Warrior" from Middle Bronze Age Canaan -- Becoming a Teaching Collection "Object": Skull 901 AEH 66 -- Theorizing Subjects and Objects -- Re-subjectifying the Skull Through Teaching -- Conclusion -- References.

Chapter 12: Conclusion: Challenging the Narrative -- Expanding the Umbrella of Bioarchaeology -- Contextualization and a Critical Bioarchaeology -- Communicating Bioarchaeology -- Engaging with Anatomical Collections -- A Bioarchaeology of Anatomy Collections -- Self-reflection -- Parting Thoughts -- References -- Index.

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