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Flood Risk Management Strategies and Governance.

By: Raadgever, Tom.
Contributor(s): Hegger, Dries.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cham : Springer, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (181 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319676999.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Flood Risk Management Strategies and GovernanceLOC classification: GB3-5030Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Authors -- Lead Authors Part I: -- Lead Authors Part II: -- Other Contributing Authors (Alphabetical Order): -- Foreword -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Executive Summary -- Contents -- Part I: Scientific Conclusions on Resilient, Efficient and Legitimate Flood Risk Governance in Europe -- Chapter 1: Researching Flood Risk Governance in Europe -- 1.1 Flood Risk Governance in Europe -- 1.2 The Relevance of a Governance Perspective on Flood Risk Management -- 1.3 Research Aims and Questions -- 1.4 Research Approach and Methods -- 1.4.1 Research Approach -- 1.4.2 Research Methods -- 1.5 Overview of the Deliverable Reports and Journal Articles Underlying STAR-FLOOD's Key Conclusions -- 1.6 Outline of the Report -- References -- Chapter 2: Diversification of Flood Risk Management Strategies - Necessity and Importance -- 2.1 The Extent to Which Diversification Is Taking Place -- 2.2 Drivers for Diversification -- 2.2.1 Actor-Related Drivers -- 2.2.2 Discourse-Related Drivers -- 2.2.3 Rules-Related Drivers -- 2.2.4 Resource-Related Drivers -- 2.2.5 Drivers Encompassing Several Dimensions (Actors, Discourses, Rules, Resources) Simultaneously -- 2.3 Barriers to Diversification -- 2.4 Lessons for the Necessity of and Possibilities for Diversification -- References -- Chapter 3: Enhancing Connectivity Between Strategies by Bridging Actors, Levels and Sectors -- 3.1 The Link Between Fragmentation and Diversification -- 3.2 The Involvement of Governments, Businesses, NGOs and Citizens in Flood Risk Governance -- 3.2.1 The Role of Governmental Actors in Flood Risk Governance -- 3.2.2 The Role of Businesses in Flood Risk Governance -- 3.2.3 The Role of Community Groups, NGOs and Citizens in Flood Risk Governance -- 3.2.4 Towards Multi-actor Co-production.
3.3 Bridging Between Administrative Levels: Reconciling the Need for Local Flexibility and Coordination -- 3.4 Bridging Between Flood Risk Management Strategies -- 3.4.1 A Bridging Role for Spatial Planning: Strengthening Flood Prevention and Flood Mitigation -- 3.4.2 The Role of Spatial Planning in Emergency Management: Bridging Between Defence, Prevention and Preparation -- 3.4.3 Bridging Between FRM and the Insurance Sector: The Link Between Prevention and Recovery -- References -- Chapter 4: Rules and Resources for Flood Risk Governance -- 4.1 Flood Risk Governance Rules -- 4.1.1 The Implementation of New Rules and Regulations at the National and Regional Level -- 4.1.2 The EU Floods Directive (Directive 2007/60/EC) -- 4.1.3 Subsidiarity, Responsibilities and Coordination -- 4.2 Flood Risk Governance Resources -- 4.2.1 The Financial Resource Base in the Six STAR-FLOOD Countries -- 4.2.2 Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes as Crucial Resources -- References -- Chapter 5: Evaluations of Flood Risk Governance in Terms of Resilience, Efficiency and Legitimacy -- 5.1 Evaluations of Resilience -- 5.2 Evaluation of Efficiency -- 5.3 Evaluation of Legitimacy -- References -- Chapter 6: Implications for Risk Governance Research and Practice -- 6.1 Implications for Flood Risk Governance Research -- 6.1.1 Reflection on STAR-FLOOD's Research Approach -- 6.1.1.1 Key Features of the Approach -- 6.1.1.2 Strenghts and Points for Improvement of the Research Approach -- 6.1.1.3 Overall Recommendations for Future European Projects -- 6.1.2 Issues for Further Research -- 6.2 Implications for Flood Risk Governance Practice -- 6.2.1 Introduction -- 6.2.2 Design Principles for Improving Flood Risk Governance Processes -- 6.2.3 Design Principles for Improving Flood Risk Governance Outcomes.
6.2.4 Overall Recommendations on Appropriate and Resilient Flood Risk Governance Arrangements -- References -- Part II: Practitioner's Guidebook -- Inspiration for Flood Risk Governance -- Chapter 7: The Relevance of Flood Risk Management and Governance -- 7.1 Flood Risk in Europe -- 7.2 Flood Risk in the STAR-FLOOD Countries -- 7.3 How to Use Part II as Guidebook? -- 7.3.1 Main Objective and Target Audience -- 7.3.2 Set Up Part II -- 7.3.3 Guidebook Online -- References -- Chapter 8: Flood Risk Management Strategies -- 8.1 Flood Risk Management Strategies -- 8.2 Management Strategies in the STAR-FLOOD Countries -- 8.3 Towards Resilience, Legitimacy and Efficiency -- 8.3.1 Resilience -- 8.3.2 Efficiency -- 8.3.3 Legitimacy -- 8.4 How to Select Flood Risk Management Strategies -- References -- Chapter 9: Flood Risk Governance -- 9.1 Flood Risk Governance Arrangements -- 9.2 Governance Arrangements in the STAR-FLOOD Countries -- 9.3 Factors Promoting Stability or Change -- 9.4 How to Change Flood Risk Governance in a Specific Area? -- 9.4.1 Step 1. Analyse the Current Situation -- 9.4.2 Step 2. Define the Desired Situation -- 9.4.3 Step 3. Define and Prioritise the Actions -- 9.4.4 Step 4. Start Change -- References -- Chapter 10: Integrated Planning, Coordination and Collaboration -- 10.1 Common Challenges -- 10.2 How to Implement the Floods Directive? -- 10.2.1 Floods Directive as Driver for Change: Poland -- 10.3 How to Make Integrated Plans for the Future? -- 10.3.1 Climate Adaptation as a Trigger: Sweden -- 10.3.2 PAPI, a Bottom-Up Approach Towards Resilience: France -- 10.3.3 Adaptive Delta Planning: The Netherlands -- 10.3.4 The Sigma Plan, Defence and Controlled Flooding: Belgium -- 10.3.5 Multi-scale and Adaptive Management for the Thames Estuary: England -- 10.4 How to Collaborate in River Basins?.
10.4.1 River Contracts in Wallonia: Belgium -- 10.5 How to Build Bridges Between Different Governmental Levels? -- 10.5.1 Multi-level Cooperation in Dordrecht: The Netherland -- References -- Chapter 11: Before a Flood Event -- 11.1 Common Challenges -- 11.2 How to Defend Yourself Against Flooding? -- 11.2.1 Safety Guaranteed: The Netherlands -- 11.2.1.1 Flood Defence -- 11.2.1.2 Standards-Testing-Strengthening -- 11.2.1.3 Efficiency and Knowledge Base -- 11.2.1.4 Financing Through Taxes -- 11.2.2 Temporary Flood Defences: Sweden -- 11.3 How to Provide Sufficient Space for Water? -- 11.3.1 Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems: England -- 11.3.2 Room for the River Nijmegen-Lent: The Netherlands -- 11.4 How to Include Flood Risk in Spatial Planning? -- 11.4.1 Spatial Planning Tools to Decrease Future Damage in Flanders: Belgium -- 11.4.2 Construction and Permitting: Sweden -- 11.4.3 From Regulator to Partner in Interactive Development in Nice: France -- 11.5 How to Ensure Sufficient Money for Physical Measures? -- 11.5.1 Funding by Public Taxes: The Netherlands -- 11.5.2 Partnership Funding: England -- 11.6 How to Prioritise Measures? -- 11.6.1 Cost-Benefit Analysis and Whole Life Costing: England -- 11.6.2 Cost-Benefit Analysis for Flood Risk Management Plans in Flanders: Belgium -- 11.7 How to Raise Awareness and Action by Citizens? -- 11.7.1 Encouraging Local Action to Reduce Flood Risks: England -- 11.7.2 Informing House Buyers and Tenants on Flood Risks: Belgium -- References -- Chapter 12: During a Flood Event -- 12.1 Common Challenges -- 12.2 How Can Authorities Organise Themselves in Times of Flooding? -- 12.2.1 Organising Flood Forecasting and Warning: England -- 12.2.2 Framework to Coordinate Local Emergency Response: England -- 12.2.3 SEQUANA Flood Event Management Exercise: France -- 12.3 How to Involve the Public in Times of Flooding?.
12.3.1 Community Flood Action Plans and Flood Wardens: England -- 12.3.2 Firefighters, Volunteers and Local Leaders: Poland -- 12.3.3 Booklet to Inform on Flood Risks and Evacuation Perspectives: Sweden -- 12.3.4 Website 'Should I Stay or Should I Go': The Netherlands -- References -- Chapter 13: After a Flood Event -- 13.1 Common Challenges -- 13.2 How to Provide Sufficient Money for Recovery? -- 13.2.1 Flood Insurance and Reinsurance: England -- 13.2.2 Insurance with Differentiated Premiums: Belgium -- 13.2.3 Cat Nat Public-Private Insurance System: France -- 13.2.4 Public Compensation Fund: The Netherlands -- 13.2.5 Bellwin Scheme Compensating Local Authorities: England -- 13.3 How to Maintain and Restore Critical Infrastructure, Healthcare and Other Functions? -- 13.3.1 National Infrastructure Resilience Programme: England -- 13.4 How to Learn from the Past...? -- 13.4.1 Independent Flood Management and Response Reviews: England -- 13.4.2 Flood Events as a Trigger for Change: Poland -- References -- Glossary.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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QE1-996.5GB5000-5030 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=5234698 Available EBC5234698

Intro -- Authors -- Lead Authors Part I: -- Lead Authors Part II: -- Other Contributing Authors (Alphabetical Order): -- Foreword -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Executive Summary -- Contents -- Part I: Scientific Conclusions on Resilient, Efficient and Legitimate Flood Risk Governance in Europe -- Chapter 1: Researching Flood Risk Governance in Europe -- 1.1 Flood Risk Governance in Europe -- 1.2 The Relevance of a Governance Perspective on Flood Risk Management -- 1.3 Research Aims and Questions -- 1.4 Research Approach and Methods -- 1.4.1 Research Approach -- 1.4.2 Research Methods -- 1.5 Overview of the Deliverable Reports and Journal Articles Underlying STAR-FLOOD's Key Conclusions -- 1.6 Outline of the Report -- References -- Chapter 2: Diversification of Flood Risk Management Strategies - Necessity and Importance -- 2.1 The Extent to Which Diversification Is Taking Place -- 2.2 Drivers for Diversification -- 2.2.1 Actor-Related Drivers -- 2.2.2 Discourse-Related Drivers -- 2.2.3 Rules-Related Drivers -- 2.2.4 Resource-Related Drivers -- 2.2.5 Drivers Encompassing Several Dimensions (Actors, Discourses, Rules, Resources) Simultaneously -- 2.3 Barriers to Diversification -- 2.4 Lessons for the Necessity of and Possibilities for Diversification -- References -- Chapter 3: Enhancing Connectivity Between Strategies by Bridging Actors, Levels and Sectors -- 3.1 The Link Between Fragmentation and Diversification -- 3.2 The Involvement of Governments, Businesses, NGOs and Citizens in Flood Risk Governance -- 3.2.1 The Role of Governmental Actors in Flood Risk Governance -- 3.2.2 The Role of Businesses in Flood Risk Governance -- 3.2.3 The Role of Community Groups, NGOs and Citizens in Flood Risk Governance -- 3.2.4 Towards Multi-actor Co-production.

3.3 Bridging Between Administrative Levels: Reconciling the Need for Local Flexibility and Coordination -- 3.4 Bridging Between Flood Risk Management Strategies -- 3.4.1 A Bridging Role for Spatial Planning: Strengthening Flood Prevention and Flood Mitigation -- 3.4.2 The Role of Spatial Planning in Emergency Management: Bridging Between Defence, Prevention and Preparation -- 3.4.3 Bridging Between FRM and the Insurance Sector: The Link Between Prevention and Recovery -- References -- Chapter 4: Rules and Resources for Flood Risk Governance -- 4.1 Flood Risk Governance Rules -- 4.1.1 The Implementation of New Rules and Regulations at the National and Regional Level -- 4.1.2 The EU Floods Directive (Directive 2007/60/EC) -- 4.1.3 Subsidiarity, Responsibilities and Coordination -- 4.2 Flood Risk Governance Resources -- 4.2.1 The Financial Resource Base in the Six STAR-FLOOD Countries -- 4.2.2 Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes as Crucial Resources -- References -- Chapter 5: Evaluations of Flood Risk Governance in Terms of Resilience, Efficiency and Legitimacy -- 5.1 Evaluations of Resilience -- 5.2 Evaluation of Efficiency -- 5.3 Evaluation of Legitimacy -- References -- Chapter 6: Implications for Risk Governance Research and Practice -- 6.1 Implications for Flood Risk Governance Research -- 6.1.1 Reflection on STAR-FLOOD's Research Approach -- 6.1.1.1 Key Features of the Approach -- 6.1.1.2 Strenghts and Points for Improvement of the Research Approach -- 6.1.1.3 Overall Recommendations for Future European Projects -- 6.1.2 Issues for Further Research -- 6.2 Implications for Flood Risk Governance Practice -- 6.2.1 Introduction -- 6.2.2 Design Principles for Improving Flood Risk Governance Processes -- 6.2.3 Design Principles for Improving Flood Risk Governance Outcomes.

6.2.4 Overall Recommendations on Appropriate and Resilient Flood Risk Governance Arrangements -- References -- Part II: Practitioner's Guidebook -- Inspiration for Flood Risk Governance -- Chapter 7: The Relevance of Flood Risk Management and Governance -- 7.1 Flood Risk in Europe -- 7.2 Flood Risk in the STAR-FLOOD Countries -- 7.3 How to Use Part II as Guidebook? -- 7.3.1 Main Objective and Target Audience -- 7.3.2 Set Up Part II -- 7.3.3 Guidebook Online -- References -- Chapter 8: Flood Risk Management Strategies -- 8.1 Flood Risk Management Strategies -- 8.2 Management Strategies in the STAR-FLOOD Countries -- 8.3 Towards Resilience, Legitimacy and Efficiency -- 8.3.1 Resilience -- 8.3.2 Efficiency -- 8.3.3 Legitimacy -- 8.4 How to Select Flood Risk Management Strategies -- References -- Chapter 9: Flood Risk Governance -- 9.1 Flood Risk Governance Arrangements -- 9.2 Governance Arrangements in the STAR-FLOOD Countries -- 9.3 Factors Promoting Stability or Change -- 9.4 How to Change Flood Risk Governance in a Specific Area? -- 9.4.1 Step 1. Analyse the Current Situation -- 9.4.2 Step 2. Define the Desired Situation -- 9.4.3 Step 3. Define and Prioritise the Actions -- 9.4.4 Step 4. Start Change -- References -- Chapter 10: Integrated Planning, Coordination and Collaboration -- 10.1 Common Challenges -- 10.2 How to Implement the Floods Directive? -- 10.2.1 Floods Directive as Driver for Change: Poland -- 10.3 How to Make Integrated Plans for the Future? -- 10.3.1 Climate Adaptation as a Trigger: Sweden -- 10.3.2 PAPI, a Bottom-Up Approach Towards Resilience: France -- 10.3.3 Adaptive Delta Planning: The Netherlands -- 10.3.4 The Sigma Plan, Defence and Controlled Flooding: Belgium -- 10.3.5 Multi-scale and Adaptive Management for the Thames Estuary: England -- 10.4 How to Collaborate in River Basins?.

10.4.1 River Contracts in Wallonia: Belgium -- 10.5 How to Build Bridges Between Different Governmental Levels? -- 10.5.1 Multi-level Cooperation in Dordrecht: The Netherland -- References -- Chapter 11: Before a Flood Event -- 11.1 Common Challenges -- 11.2 How to Defend Yourself Against Flooding? -- 11.2.1 Safety Guaranteed: The Netherlands -- 11.2.1.1 Flood Defence -- 11.2.1.2 Standards-Testing-Strengthening -- 11.2.1.3 Efficiency and Knowledge Base -- 11.2.1.4 Financing Through Taxes -- 11.2.2 Temporary Flood Defences: Sweden -- 11.3 How to Provide Sufficient Space for Water? -- 11.3.1 Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems: England -- 11.3.2 Room for the River Nijmegen-Lent: The Netherlands -- 11.4 How to Include Flood Risk in Spatial Planning? -- 11.4.1 Spatial Planning Tools to Decrease Future Damage in Flanders: Belgium -- 11.4.2 Construction and Permitting: Sweden -- 11.4.3 From Regulator to Partner in Interactive Development in Nice: France -- 11.5 How to Ensure Sufficient Money for Physical Measures? -- 11.5.1 Funding by Public Taxes: The Netherlands -- 11.5.2 Partnership Funding: England -- 11.6 How to Prioritise Measures? -- 11.6.1 Cost-Benefit Analysis and Whole Life Costing: England -- 11.6.2 Cost-Benefit Analysis for Flood Risk Management Plans in Flanders: Belgium -- 11.7 How to Raise Awareness and Action by Citizens? -- 11.7.1 Encouraging Local Action to Reduce Flood Risks: England -- 11.7.2 Informing House Buyers and Tenants on Flood Risks: Belgium -- References -- Chapter 12: During a Flood Event -- 12.1 Common Challenges -- 12.2 How Can Authorities Organise Themselves in Times of Flooding? -- 12.2.1 Organising Flood Forecasting and Warning: England -- 12.2.2 Framework to Coordinate Local Emergency Response: England -- 12.2.3 SEQUANA Flood Event Management Exercise: France -- 12.3 How to Involve the Public in Times of Flooding?.

12.3.1 Community Flood Action Plans and Flood Wardens: England -- 12.3.2 Firefighters, Volunteers and Local Leaders: Poland -- 12.3.3 Booklet to Inform on Flood Risks and Evacuation Perspectives: Sweden -- 12.3.4 Website 'Should I Stay or Should I Go': The Netherlands -- References -- Chapter 13: After a Flood Event -- 13.1 Common Challenges -- 13.2 How to Provide Sufficient Money for Recovery? -- 13.2.1 Flood Insurance and Reinsurance: England -- 13.2.2 Insurance with Differentiated Premiums: Belgium -- 13.2.3 Cat Nat Public-Private Insurance System: France -- 13.2.4 Public Compensation Fund: The Netherlands -- 13.2.5 Bellwin Scheme Compensating Local Authorities: England -- 13.3 How to Maintain and Restore Critical Infrastructure, Healthcare and Other Functions? -- 13.3.1 National Infrastructure Resilience Programme: England -- 13.4 How to Learn from the Past...? -- 13.4.1 Independent Flood Management and Response Reviews: England -- 13.4.2 Flood Events as a Trigger for Change: Poland -- References -- Glossary.

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