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Moral Distress in the Health Professions.

By: Ulrich, Connie M.
Contributor(s): Grady, Christine.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cham : Springer, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (173 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319646268.Subject(s): Ethical problems | Medical ethicsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Moral Distress in the Health ProfessionsDDC classification: 174.2 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Contributors -- 1: Introduction -- 1.1 The Organization of the Book -- References -- 2: What We Know About Moral Distress -- 2.1 Moral Distress: Evolution of the Concept -- 2.2 Conceptual Origin and Evolution of the Definition -- 2.3 Challenges and Critiques of the Definition -- 2.4 Appreciating the Reciprocity of Structure and Agency -- References -- 3: Healthcare Professional Narratives on Moral Distress: Disciplinary Perspectives -- 3.1 Reviews of Moral Distress in Nursing and in Social Work -- 3.1.1 Moral Distress in Nursing: Looking Back to Move Forward -- 3.1.1.1 Introduction -- 3.1.1.2 The Moral Milieu of an Institution: Predecessor Literature -- 3.1.1.3 Shaping and Re-Shaping the Moral Milieu -- 3.1.1.4 Ethics Education and Enduring Issues in Nursing -- 3.1.1.5 Various Critiques of Moral Distress -- 3.1.1.6 Conclusion -- 3.1.2 Social Work Perspective: Moral Distress -- 3.1.2.1 Introduction -- 3.1.2.2 Limitations in Empirical Scholarly Work -- 3.1.2.3 Moral Distress in Social Work -- 3.1.2.4 Root Causes of Moral Distress in Social Work -- 3.1.2.5 Implications for Social Work Education and Practice -- 3.2 Part 2: Healthcare Professional Perspectives -- 3.2.1 A Source of Moral Distress: The Corporatization of Medicine -- 3.2.2 Moral Distress: A Psychiatrist Perspective -- 3.2.3 Physicians' Experiences of Moral Distress and Burnout -- 3.2.3.1 Physician Narratives -- Legal Rights in Organ Donation: Directed Donation -- Right to Information: International Medical Care -- Patient-Physician Communication: Gestational Carrier -- 3.2.4 A Chaplain's Perspective on Moral Distress -- 3.2.5 Moral Distress in Pediatric Nursing and Research -- 3.2.6 Pharmacist's Perspective on Moral Distress in Palliative Care: A Narrative -- References -- 4: A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress.
4.1 The Case for Broadening Our Understanding of Moral Distress -- 4.1.1 Moral Uncertainty -- 4.1.2 Mild Distress -- 4.1.3 Delayed Distress -- 4.1.4 Moral Dilemma -- 4.1.5 Bad Moral Luck -- 4.1.6 Distress by Association -- 4.2 A New Definition of Moral Distress -- 4.3 Is It Too Broad? -- 4.4 Toward a Taxonomy of Moral Distress -- 4.5 Conclusion -- 4.6 A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress Revisited -- References -- A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress -- A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress Revisited -- 5: Sources of Moral Distress -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Major Root Causes of Moral Distress -- 5.2.1 Clinical Situations -- 5.2.1.1 Technology -- 5.2.1.2 Care Near the End of Life -- 5.2.1.3 Interprofessional Practice -- 5.2.1.4 Hastening the Dying Process -- 5.2.2 Internal Constraints -- 5.2.2.1 Individual -- 5.2.2.2 Professional Socialization -- 5.2.2.3 Perceived Powerlessness -- 5.2.2.4 Ethics Knowledge -- 5.2.3 External Constraints -- 5.2.3.1 Person- and Family-Centered Care -- 5.2.3.2 Following Family Wishes for Patient Care for Fear of Litigation -- 5.2.3.3 Professionalism -- 5.2.3.4 Policies and Priorities -- 5.2.3.5 Organizational Values and Ethical Climate -- 5.2.3.6 Societal Factors -- References -- 6: Building Compassionate Work Environments: The Concept of and Measurement of Ethical Climate -- 6.1 Building Compassionate Work Environments: The Concept and Measurement of Ethical Climate -- 6.2 Measure of Ethical Climate: The Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS, [1]) -- 6.3 Conditions for Ethical Reflection in Organizations -- 6.3.1 Power and Trust -- 6.3.2 Inclusion -- 6.3.3 Role Flexibility and Inquiry -- 6.3.4 Ethical Climate or Ethical Culture -- 6.4 Research -- 6.4.1 The Relationship Between Ethical Climate and Moral Distress.
6.5 Ethical Climate and Turnover Intention and Job Satisfaction -- 6.6 Summary and Conclusion -- References -- 7: Moral Distress Research Agenda -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 A Theoretical Perspective for Researching Moral Distress -- 7.3 A Socioecological Research Agenda for Moral Integrity and Moral Distress -- 7.3.1 Defining and Measuring Moral Distress -- 7.3.2 Exploring Moral Integrity -- 7.3.3 Expanding the Study of Moral Distress -- 7.3.4 Examining the Concept of Moral Community -- 7.3.4.1 Impact of Moral Spaces: Ethics Rounds to Promote Moral Community -- 7.4 A Research Agenda for Action on Moral Distress -- 7.4.1 Primary Prevention Strategies for Moral Distress -- 7.4.1.1 Speaking Up Policy -- 7.4.1.2 Collaborative Governance: Ethics in Clinical Practice Committee -- 7.4.1.3 Policy Development for Patients Approaching End of Life -- 7.4.1.4 Proactive Collaboration for Patients Who Are Chronically Critically Ill -- 7.4.2 Risk Reduction Strategies for Moral Distress -- 7.4.2.1 Ethics Early Action Protocol -- 7.4.2.2 Clinical Ethics Residency for Nurses -- 7.4.3 Mitigation and Treatment Strategies for Moral Distress -- 7.4.3.1 Moral Distress Consultation Service -- 7.4.3.2 Healing from Moral Distress -- 7.5 Final Thoughts on Researching Moral Distress -- References -- 8: International Perspectives on Moral Distress -- 8.1 International Perspectives on Moral Distress -- 8.2 European Perspectives on Moral Distress -- 8.2.1 Moral Distress Studies in Europe -- 8.2.2 From Individual Caretaker Viewpoint to Team Perspective -- 8.2.3 Results of the APPROPRICUS Study -- 8.2.4 Conclusion -- 8.3 Speaking Truth to Power -- 8.4 Moral Distress in the Provision of Health Care in Tanzania: Developing World Perspective -- 8.5 Truth Telling and Moral Distress: A Singaporean Perspective -- 8.5.1 Introduction.
8.5.2 Truth-telling and Moral Distress in the Singapore Context -- 8.5.3 Moral Distress in the Personal Space: The Nurse as the Family Caregiver -- 8.5.4 Final Thoughts... -- References -- 9: Reflections on Moral Distress and Moral Success -- 9.1 Significant Reasons for Moral Distress -- 9.2 Examples of Moral Success -- 9.3 Summary -- References.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RT81.5RC963-969.2QH3 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=5261363 Available EBC5261363

Intro -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Contributors -- 1: Introduction -- 1.1 The Organization of the Book -- References -- 2: What We Know About Moral Distress -- 2.1 Moral Distress: Evolution of the Concept -- 2.2 Conceptual Origin and Evolution of the Definition -- 2.3 Challenges and Critiques of the Definition -- 2.4 Appreciating the Reciprocity of Structure and Agency -- References -- 3: Healthcare Professional Narratives on Moral Distress: Disciplinary Perspectives -- 3.1 Reviews of Moral Distress in Nursing and in Social Work -- 3.1.1 Moral Distress in Nursing: Looking Back to Move Forward -- 3.1.1.1 Introduction -- 3.1.1.2 The Moral Milieu of an Institution: Predecessor Literature -- 3.1.1.3 Shaping and Re-Shaping the Moral Milieu -- 3.1.1.4 Ethics Education and Enduring Issues in Nursing -- 3.1.1.5 Various Critiques of Moral Distress -- 3.1.1.6 Conclusion -- 3.1.2 Social Work Perspective: Moral Distress -- 3.1.2.1 Introduction -- 3.1.2.2 Limitations in Empirical Scholarly Work -- 3.1.2.3 Moral Distress in Social Work -- 3.1.2.4 Root Causes of Moral Distress in Social Work -- 3.1.2.5 Implications for Social Work Education and Practice -- 3.2 Part 2: Healthcare Professional Perspectives -- 3.2.1 A Source of Moral Distress: The Corporatization of Medicine -- 3.2.2 Moral Distress: A Psychiatrist Perspective -- 3.2.3 Physicians' Experiences of Moral Distress and Burnout -- 3.2.3.1 Physician Narratives -- Legal Rights in Organ Donation: Directed Donation -- Right to Information: International Medical Care -- Patient-Physician Communication: Gestational Carrier -- 3.2.4 A Chaplain's Perspective on Moral Distress -- 3.2.5 Moral Distress in Pediatric Nursing and Research -- 3.2.6 Pharmacist's Perspective on Moral Distress in Palliative Care: A Narrative -- References -- 4: A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress.

4.1 The Case for Broadening Our Understanding of Moral Distress -- 4.1.1 Moral Uncertainty -- 4.1.2 Mild Distress -- 4.1.3 Delayed Distress -- 4.1.4 Moral Dilemma -- 4.1.5 Bad Moral Luck -- 4.1.6 Distress by Association -- 4.2 A New Definition of Moral Distress -- 4.3 Is It Too Broad? -- 4.4 Toward a Taxonomy of Moral Distress -- 4.5 Conclusion -- 4.6 A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress Revisited -- References -- A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress -- A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress Revisited -- 5: Sources of Moral Distress -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Major Root Causes of Moral Distress -- 5.2.1 Clinical Situations -- 5.2.1.1 Technology -- 5.2.1.2 Care Near the End of Life -- 5.2.1.3 Interprofessional Practice -- 5.2.1.4 Hastening the Dying Process -- 5.2.2 Internal Constraints -- 5.2.2.1 Individual -- 5.2.2.2 Professional Socialization -- 5.2.2.3 Perceived Powerlessness -- 5.2.2.4 Ethics Knowledge -- 5.2.3 External Constraints -- 5.2.3.1 Person- and Family-Centered Care -- 5.2.3.2 Following Family Wishes for Patient Care for Fear of Litigation -- 5.2.3.3 Professionalism -- 5.2.3.4 Policies and Priorities -- 5.2.3.5 Organizational Values and Ethical Climate -- 5.2.3.6 Societal Factors -- References -- 6: Building Compassionate Work Environments: The Concept of and Measurement of Ethical Climate -- 6.1 Building Compassionate Work Environments: The Concept and Measurement of Ethical Climate -- 6.2 Measure of Ethical Climate: The Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS, [1]) -- 6.3 Conditions for Ethical Reflection in Organizations -- 6.3.1 Power and Trust -- 6.3.2 Inclusion -- 6.3.3 Role Flexibility and Inquiry -- 6.3.4 Ethical Climate or Ethical Culture -- 6.4 Research -- 6.4.1 The Relationship Between Ethical Climate and Moral Distress.

6.5 Ethical Climate and Turnover Intention and Job Satisfaction -- 6.6 Summary and Conclusion -- References -- 7: Moral Distress Research Agenda -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 A Theoretical Perspective for Researching Moral Distress -- 7.3 A Socioecological Research Agenda for Moral Integrity and Moral Distress -- 7.3.1 Defining and Measuring Moral Distress -- 7.3.2 Exploring Moral Integrity -- 7.3.3 Expanding the Study of Moral Distress -- 7.3.4 Examining the Concept of Moral Community -- 7.3.4.1 Impact of Moral Spaces: Ethics Rounds to Promote Moral Community -- 7.4 A Research Agenda for Action on Moral Distress -- 7.4.1 Primary Prevention Strategies for Moral Distress -- 7.4.1.1 Speaking Up Policy -- 7.4.1.2 Collaborative Governance: Ethics in Clinical Practice Committee -- 7.4.1.3 Policy Development for Patients Approaching End of Life -- 7.4.1.4 Proactive Collaboration for Patients Who Are Chronically Critically Ill -- 7.4.2 Risk Reduction Strategies for Moral Distress -- 7.4.2.1 Ethics Early Action Protocol -- 7.4.2.2 Clinical Ethics Residency for Nurses -- 7.4.3 Mitigation and Treatment Strategies for Moral Distress -- 7.4.3.1 Moral Distress Consultation Service -- 7.4.3.2 Healing from Moral Distress -- 7.5 Final Thoughts on Researching Moral Distress -- References -- 8: International Perspectives on Moral Distress -- 8.1 International Perspectives on Moral Distress -- 8.2 European Perspectives on Moral Distress -- 8.2.1 Moral Distress Studies in Europe -- 8.2.2 From Individual Caretaker Viewpoint to Team Perspective -- 8.2.3 Results of the APPROPRICUS Study -- 8.2.4 Conclusion -- 8.3 Speaking Truth to Power -- 8.4 Moral Distress in the Provision of Health Care in Tanzania: Developing World Perspective -- 8.5 Truth Telling and Moral Distress: A Singaporean Perspective -- 8.5.1 Introduction.

8.5.2 Truth-telling and Moral Distress in the Singapore Context -- 8.5.3 Moral Distress in the Personal Space: The Nurse as the Family Caregiver -- 8.5.4 Final Thoughts... -- References -- 9: Reflections on Moral Distress and Moral Success -- 9.1 Significant Reasons for Moral Distress -- 9.2 Examples of Moral Success -- 9.3 Summary -- References.

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