Moon rope : a Peruvian folktale = Un lazo a la luna : una leyenda peruana / Lois Ehlert ; translated into Spanish by Amy Prince.

By: Ehlert, LoisMaterial type: TextTextLanguage: engspa Publisher: San Diego : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, c1992Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 31 cmISBN: 0152553436; 9780152553432; 0153021098; 9780153021091Subject(s): Folklore -- Peru -- Juvenile literature | Moon -- Folklore -- Juvenile literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Moon rope.DDC classification: 398.24/52/0985 | 398/.0985 LOC classification: PZ8.1.E3 | Mo 1992GR133.P4 | E35 1992Summary: An adaptation of the Peruvian folktale in which Fox and Mole try to climb to the moon on a rope woven of grass.
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An adaptation of the Peruvian folktale in which Fox and Mole try to climb to the moon on a rope woven of grass.

English and Spanish.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-- A retelling of a Peruvian pourquoi story, presented in English and Spanish, that is concise and funny. Mole is a practical fellow who longs only for ``Worms, worms, more worms.'' Fox, however, is a visionary; he wants to go to the moon. He deter: mines his method of access (a grass rope to be hooked around the bow of the crescent), chooses Mole as his companion, and, with the aid of some birds, sets off. He achieves his goal, his friend does not, and bits about the nature of the moon and the mole are explained in the process. Prince's stylish translation really shines. Her fox is so clearly obsessed with his project and so convincing in a used-car-salesman sort of way, that an oral telling cannot help but produce correct, funny inflections. Ehlert's cut-paper illustrations are striking. The bold colors range from earth tones to Day-Glo pinks, purples, and oranges, and her use of silver for Fox and for the moon is masterful. Shapes cut, apparently, by using the lines of rulers and templates as guides produce a remarkable, contemporary rendering of Peruvian folkart. Despite the use of fairly simple lines, the characters have personality and verve. The book's generous size makes this perfect for group sharing. Moon Rope can be used to give non-Spanish speakers an idea of the rhythm and cadence of that language. It is a fine purchase for folktale and picture-book collections as well as for ESL programs. --Ann Welton, Thomas Academy, Kent, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Lois Ehlert was born November 9, 1934, in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and the Layton School of Art. She has also worked as an art teacher, freelance illustrator, and designer. Her work as an author and an illustrator has appeared in countless publications and has received numerous awards and honors.

In addition to creating books, Ehlert has produced toys, games, clothes for children, posters, brochures, catalogs, and banners. She has received the Caldecott Honor Book, 1989, for Color Zoo, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year for Snowballs, the Booklist Editors' Choice for Cuckoo/Cucú: A Mexican Folktale/Un Cuento Folklórico Mexicano, the IRA Teachers' Choice and NCTE Notable Children's Trade Book in the Language Arts for Feathers for Lunch, the American Library Association Notable Children's Book and Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Award for Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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