UNIX systems programming : communication, concurrency, and threads / Kay A. Robbins, Steven Robbins.

By: Robbins, Kay AContributor(s): Robbins, Steven, 1947- | Robbins, Kay A. Practical UNIX programmingMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall PTR, ýý2003. Publisher: Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall PTR, ©2003Description: xvii, 893 pages : illustrations ; 25 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0130424110; 9780130424112Subject(s): UNIX (Computer file) | UNIX (Computer file) | UNIX (Computer file) | Operating systems (Computers) | Operating systems (Computers) | UNIXDDC classification: 005.432 LOC classification: QA76.76.O63 | R6215 2003Other classification: ST 261 U61 | ST 261
Contents:
Part 1: Fundamentals -- Chapter 1: Technology's impact on programs -- Chapter 2: Programs, processes and threads -- Chapter 3: Processes in UNIX -- Chapter 4: UNIX I/O -- Chapter 5: Files and directories -- Chapter 6: UNIX special files -- Chapter 7: Project: the token ring -- Part 2: Asynchronous events -- Chapter 8: Signals -- Chapter 9: Times and timers -- Chapter 10: Project: virtual timers -- Chapter 11: Project: Cracking shells -- Part 3: Concurrency -- Chapter 12: POSIX threads -- Chapter 13: Thread synchronization -- Chapter 14: Critical sections and semaphores -- Chapter 15: POSIX IPC -- Chapter 16: Project: producer consumer synchronization -- Chapter 17: Project: the not too parallel virtual machine -- Part 4: Communication -- Chapter 18: Connection-oriented communication -- Chapter 19: Project: WWW redirection -- Chapter 20: Connectionless communication and multicast -- Chapter 21: Project: internet radio -- Chapter 22: Project: server performance.
Summary: This second edition of "Unix Systems Programming" shows how to design complex software to help get the best from the UNIX operating system.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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QA76.76.O63 M626 2003 Understanding Unix/Linux programming / QA76.76.O63 M6966 2010 Group policy : QA76.76.O63 M748 1989 MS-DOS user's guide / QA76.76.O63 R6215 2003 UNIX systems programming : QA76.77 .C43 2014 Principles of operating systems / QA76.774.F74 M35 2015 The design and implementation of the FreeBSD operating system / QA76.774 .I67 2016 iOS forensics cookbook :

Previously published under title: Practical UNIX programming / Kay Robbins. Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall, ©1996.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 861-869) and indexes.

Part 1: Fundamentals -- Chapter 1: Technology's impact on programs -- Chapter 2: Programs, processes and threads -- Chapter 3: Processes in UNIX -- Chapter 4: UNIX I/O -- Chapter 5: Files and directories -- Chapter 6: UNIX special files -- Chapter 7: Project: the token ring -- Part 2: Asynchronous events -- Chapter 8: Signals -- Chapter 9: Times and timers -- Chapter 10: Project: virtual timers -- Chapter 11: Project: Cracking shells -- Part 3: Concurrency -- Chapter 12: POSIX threads -- Chapter 13: Thread synchronization -- Chapter 14: Critical sections and semaphores -- Chapter 15: POSIX IPC -- Chapter 16: Project: producer consumer synchronization -- Chapter 17: Project: the not too parallel virtual machine -- Part 4: Communication -- Chapter 18: Connection-oriented communication -- Chapter 19: Project: WWW redirection -- Chapter 20: Connectionless communication and multicast -- Chapter 21: Project: internet radio -- Chapter 22: Project: server performance.

This second edition of "Unix Systems Programming" shows how to design complex software to help get the best from the UNIX operating system.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Anyone hoping to do successful systems programming for UNIX servers must be constantly aware of all the traps, pitfalls, lures, and snares that lie in wait for the ill-prepared programmer or the ill-considered program. When a plethora of users all run the same program, when a variety of processes all seek access to the same file, when one program begets multiple independent threads, the dangers inherent in running many concurrent asynchronous routines can, if left uncontrolled, inadvertently reveal or destroy data, and even bring a server to its knees. Robbins and Robbins (both, computer science, Univ. of Texas at San Antonio) provide the wherewithal to assure safe and effective systems programming: error handling, security measures, mutual exclusion techniques, communication, file and stream handling, etc. Classroom-tested materials include many exercises, much reusable code, and numerous practical examples of safe--and unsafe--coding. Prerequisites include experience in C programming and a modicum of familiarity with UNIX. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals; two-year technical program students. F. E. J. Linton Wesleyan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

About the Authors

Kay A. Robbins and Steven Robbins received doctoral degrees from MITand are on the faculty in the Department of Computer Science at theUniversity of Texas at San Antonio.

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