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Radical sisters : second-wave feminism and black liberation in Washington, D.C. / Anne Valk.

By: Valk, Anne M, 1964-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Women in American history: Publisher: Urbana, Ill. : Chesham : University of Illinois Press ; Combined Academic [distributor], 2010Description: xiv, 253 pages : illustrations, map ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780252077548; 0252077547.Subject(s): Feminism -- United States | African American feminists -- Washington (D.C.) | African American feminists | Feminism | United States | Washington (D.C.)DDC classification: 305.488960730753
Contents:
Introduction -- Mobilizing for political and economic rights -- Defining welfare rights -- Washington women's liberation movement -- Organizing for reproductive control -- Women and Black liberation -- Lesbian feminism and separatism -- Coalition building against sexual violence -- Conclusion.
Review: "Radical Sisters is a fresh exploration of the ways that 1960s political movements shaped local, grassroots feminism in Washington, D.C. Rejecting notions of a universal sisterhood, Anne M. Valk argues that activists periodically worked to bridge differences for the sake of improving women's plight, even while maintaining distinct political bases. Washington, D.C. is a critical site for studying the dynamics of the feminist movement, not only for its strategic location vis-a-vis the federal government but because in 1970 over 70 percent of the city's population was African American. While most historiography on the subject tends to portray the feminist movement as deeply divided over issues of race, Valk presents a more nuanced account, showing feminists of various backgrounds both coming together to promote a notion of "sisterhood" and being deeply divided along the lines of class, race, and sexuality."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1421 .V37 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002132546

Originally published: 2008.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 225-248) and index.

Introduction -- Mobilizing for political and economic rights -- Defining welfare rights -- Washington women's liberation movement -- Organizing for reproductive control -- Women and Black liberation -- Lesbian feminism and separatism -- Coalition building against sexual violence -- Conclusion.

"Radical Sisters is a fresh exploration of the ways that 1960s political movements shaped local, grassroots feminism in Washington, D.C. Rejecting notions of a universal sisterhood, Anne M. Valk argues that activists periodically worked to bridge differences for the sake of improving women's plight, even while maintaining distinct political bases. Washington, D.C. is a critical site for studying the dynamics of the feminist movement, not only for its strategic location vis-a-vis the federal government but because in 1970 over 70 percent of the city's population was African American. While most historiography on the subject tends to portray the feminist movement as deeply divided over issues of race, Valk presents a more nuanced account, showing feminists of various backgrounds both coming together to promote a notion of "sisterhood" and being deeply divided along the lines of class, race, and sexuality."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Valk (Brown) uses the nation's capital as a microcosm of the political scene of the 1960s-70s and convincingly challenges a number of truisms about the era. Historians widely accept that black women felt alienated from the white women's liberation movement; that Black Power reinforced patriarchy at women's expense; and that middle-class white women made little effort to reach out to working-class or minority women beyond vague rhetorical appeals to sisterhood. Valk convincingly argues that in Washington, DC, activists recognized overlapping political goals. For example, black women involved in welfare reform saw themselves as part of a movement addressing women's interests, working-class needs, and black civil rights. The DC Black Panthers did not unilaterally support oppressive gender relations as the solution to racial oppression. Largely white groups like the radical lesbian collective the Furies attempted to create programs to provide practical skills and knowledge to minorities and working-class women. This did not mean that radicals were successful in their efforts to work together, but Valk's in-depth analysis provides a new, more nuanced take on the era. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. A. Standish San Joaquin Delta College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Anne M. Valk is the associate director for programs for the John Nicholas Brown Center at Brown University.

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