The Third Lie : Why Government Programs Don't Work--And a Blueprint for Change.

By: Gelles, Richard JMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Walnut Creek : Routledge, 2016Copyright date: ©2011Description: 1 online resource (153 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781611320527Subject(s): Middle class - United States - Economic conditions - 21st centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Third Lie : Why Government Programs Don't Work--And a Blueprint for ChangeDDC classification: 320.60973090 LOC classification: HN65 -- .G44 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Government Programs: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly -- 1. There Ought to Be a Law! -- 2. When Good Intentions Go Bad: The Education of Jennifer Felix -- 3. Programs That Work -- 4. Effective Government Social Programs: A New Blueprint -- 5. Rebuilding Main Street: The Futures Account -- 6. Round Up the Usual Suspects -- 7. The Drunk and the Lamppost -- 8. The Emperor's Wardrobe Consultant -- Notes -- Index -- About the Author.
Summary: "I am from the government and I am here to help you" is one of the three biggest lies, or so the old joke goes. Richard J. Gelles, dean of social policy at University of Pennsylvania, explains why government programs designed to cure social ills don't work in sector after sector...and never could work. He demonstrates how each creates its own bureaucracy to monitor participation in the program, an entrenched administrative apparatus whose needs supersede those for whom the program was designed. Against this, he contrasts universal programs such as the GI Bill, Social Security, and Medicare, the most successful, sustained government programs ever established. Gelles's provocative, controversial proposal for a universal entitlement to replace a raft of lumbering social programs should be read by all in social services, policy studies, and government.
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HN64 c1968 The new basis of civilization / HN64 .C89 2014 The Promise of American Life. HN65 -- .A695 1976 Anthropology and the Public Interest : HN65 -- .G44 2011 The Third Lie : HN65 -- .G44 2011eb The Third Lie : HN65 -- .G663 2015 Race and Social Equity : HN65 -- .I65 1980 Innovation and Social Process :

Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Government Programs: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly -- 1. There Ought to Be a Law! -- 2. When Good Intentions Go Bad: The Education of Jennifer Felix -- 3. Programs That Work -- 4. Effective Government Social Programs: A New Blueprint -- 5. Rebuilding Main Street: The Futures Account -- 6. Round Up the Usual Suspects -- 7. The Drunk and the Lamppost -- 8. The Emperor's Wardrobe Consultant -- Notes -- Index -- About the Author.

"I am from the government and I am here to help you" is one of the three biggest lies, or so the old joke goes. Richard J. Gelles, dean of social policy at University of Pennsylvania, explains why government programs designed to cure social ills don't work in sector after sector...and never could work. He demonstrates how each creates its own bureaucracy to monitor participation in the program, an entrenched administrative apparatus whose needs supersede those for whom the program was designed. Against this, he contrasts universal programs such as the GI Bill, Social Security, and Medicare, the most successful, sustained government programs ever established. Gelles's provocative, controversial proposal for a universal entitlement to replace a raft of lumbering social programs should be read by all in social services, policy studies, and government.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Richard J. Gelles is Dean of the School of Social Policy & Practice at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds The Joanne and Raymond Welsh Chair of Child Welfare and Family Violence. He is the Director for the Center for Research on Youth & Social Policy and Co-Director of the Field Center for Children's Policy Practice & Research. Gelles is an internationally known expert in domestic violence and child welfare and was influential in the passage of the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997. His first book, The Violent Home (1974), was the first systematic investigation to provide empirical data on domestic violence. More recent books, such as The Book of David: How Preserving Families Can Cost Children's Lives and Intimate Violence in Families (3d ed), have also made a significant impact in the study of child welfare and family violence. He is the author of 24 books and more than 100 articles, chapters and papers.

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