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Unwind / Neal Shusterman.

By: Shusterman, Neal [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Shusterman, Neal. Unwind trilogy: bk. 1.Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, ©2007Edition: 1st ed.Description: 335 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781416912040; 1416912045; 9781416912057; 1416912053; 1442062568; 9781442062566.Subject(s): Fugitives from justice -- Juvenile fiction | Survival -- Juvenile fiction | Revolutionaries -- Juvenile fiction | Fugitives from justice -- Fiction | Survival -- Fiction | Revolutionaries -- Fiction | Science fiction | Fugitives from justice | Revolutionaries | Survival | Criminals -- Fiction | Survival skills -- Fiction | Revolutionaries -- Fiction | Science fiction | YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Action & Adventure / General | YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Science Fiction / General | YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Social Themes / Death & Dying | Dystopias -- Fiction | Revolutionaries -- Fiction | Survival skills -- Fiction | Science fiction | Fugitives from justice -- Fiction | Teenagers -- FictionGenre/Form: Fiction. | Science fiction. | Juvenile works. | Young adult works. | Horror fiction. | Young adult works. | Science fiction. | Fiction. | Juvenile works. | Young adult fiction. | Science fiction. | Horror fiction. | Science fiction.DDC classification: [Fic] LOC classification: PZ7.S55987 | Unw 2007Other classification: YAF001000 | YAF056000 | YAF058050
Contents:
In a future world where those between the ages of thirteen and eighteen can have their lives "unwound" and their body parts harvested for use by others, three teens go to extreme lengths to uphold their beliefs -- and, perhaps, save their own lives.
Awards: Eliot Rosewater Indiana High School Book Award (Rosie), 2010Summary: The Second Civil War was fought over reproductive rights. The chilling resolution: Life is inviolable from the moment of conception until age thirteen. Between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, however, parents can have their child "unwound," whereby all of the child's organs are transplanted into different donors, so life doesn't technically end. Connor is too difficult for his parents to control. Risa, a ward of the state, is not enough to be kept alive. And Lev is a tithe, a child conceived and raised to be unwound. Together, they may have a chance to escape and to survive.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Young Adult Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Young Adult Fiction Area
S5627UN (Browse shelf) Available 0000002245934

In a future world where those between the ages of thirteen and eighteen can have their lives "unwound" and their body parts harvested for use by others, three teens go to extreme lengths to uphold their beliefs -- and, perhaps, save their own lives.

The Second Civil War was fought over reproductive rights. The chilling resolution: Life is inviolable from the moment of conception until age thirteen. Between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, however, parents can have their child "unwound," whereby all of the child's organs are transplanted into different donors, so life doesn't technically end. Connor is too difficult for his parents to control. Risa, a ward of the state, is not enough to be kept alive. And Lev is a tithe, a child conceived and raised to be unwound. Together, they may have a chance to escape and to survive.

Eliot Rosewater Indiana High School Book Award (Rosie), 2010

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In the not-so-distant future, everyone has an absolute right to life--unless your parents decide on the do-over option. Between your 13th and 18th birthdays, they can have you "unwound," your pieces and parts extracted and recycled for the donor market. Why It Is Great: The unwound are kept alive until the very end of the harvesting process. A single scene made this book one of the scariest reads published for teens last year. Why It Is for Us: Shusterman's exploration of good intentions gone very, very bad will resonate with adult readers frustrated by the prochoice/prolife debate. The premise falls down in a few, significant places, but the book will still reward fans of dystopian sf. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-Set in the future, the second civil war is fought over abortion. To end the war, a compromise is reached that ends the practice of abortion but creates an alternative called "unwinding." Between the ages of 13 and 17, parents or guardians can choose to have their children unwound, which involves having every part of their bodies harvested to be "donated" to another person so, technically, they don't really die. The complex and compelling plot follows three teens whose stories intertwine when they escape while on their way to the harvest camps. Fifteen-year-old Connor's parents can no longer control him. Lev, a tithe, was raised by religious parents for the sole purpose of being unwound. Risa, a ward of the state, is a victim of shrinking budgets since she is not a talented enough musician to be kept alive. Neal Shusterman's engrossing novel (S & S, 2007) is narrated in an even cadence and matter-of-fact tone that suits the author's straightforward narrative style. His wide array of voices makes the involved story line, which is left wide open for what is sure to be an interesting sequel, easy to follow. This gripping, thought-provoking novel is guaranteed to lead to interesting discussions about abortion, adoption, organ donation, religion, politics, and health care.-Karen T. Bilton, Mary Jacobs Memorial Library, Rocky Hill, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Neal Shusterman was born in Brooklyn, New York on November 12, 1962. He received degrees in psychology and drama from the University of California, Irvine. Within a year of graduating, he had his first book deal and a screenwriting job. He has written numerous books including The Dark Side of Nowhere, Red Rider's Hood, The Shadow Club, The Shadow Club Rising, The Eyes of Kid Midas, Shattered Sky, Unwind, and Antsy Does Time. He won the National Book Award for Young People's Literature in 2015 for Challenger Deep. He also writes several series including the Skinjacker Trilogy, the Star Shards Chronicles, and the Unwind Dystology. As a screen and television writer, he has written for the Goosebumps and Animorphs television series, and wrote the Disney Channel Original Movie Pixel Perfect. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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