CBT with Justice-Involved Clients : Interventions for Antisocial and Self-Destructive Behaviors.

By: Tafrate, Raymond ChipContributor(s): Mitchell, Damon | Simourd, David JMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandTreatment Plans and Interventions for Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Ser: Publisher: New York : Guilford Publications, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (329 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781462534944Subject(s): Criminals-Mental health-Case studies | Criminals-Rehabilitation-Case studies | Forensic psychology-Case studies | MEDICAL / Psychiatry / General.-bisacsh | PSYCHOLOGY / Forensic Psychology.-bisacsh | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Social Work.-bisacshGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: CBT with Justice-Involved Clients : Interventions for Antisocial and Self-Destructive BehaviorsDDC classification: 616.89/142086927 LOC classification: RC451.4.P68 .T347 2018Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title Page -- Series Page -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Epigraph -- About the Authors -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- List of Figures, Tables, Scripts, and Forms -- Part I. Forensic Basics -- 1. The Forensic Treatment Landscape -- What Is Working with JICs Like? -- Community versus Custody: Different Settings and Challenges -- Justice Involvement: The Scope of the Problem -- What Works in Reducing Criminal Behavior? -- Is Diagnosis Important? -- A General Treatment Plan -- What Do Sessions Look Like? -- Realistic Expectations -- 2. An Integrated Forensic Cognitive‑Behavioral Therapy Approach -- Focusing on Criminal Risk Domains -- Addressing Thinking Patterns That Promote Criminality -- Enhancing Motivation for Change -- Clarifying Values and Life Priorities -- Part II. Engagement -- 3. Successfully Engaging Justice‑Involved Clients -- Motivational Interviewing and OARS Skills -- Engaging: Tips for the Initial Session -- Putting It into Practice -- 4. Clarifying Values and Life Priorities -- Why Work on Values with JICs? -- Distinguishing Values from Goals -- Identifying and Discussing Values -- Discussing Discrepancy versus Consistency between Values and Decisions -- Part III. Assessment, Case Formulation, and Focus -- 5. Assessing Criminal Risk Domains -- Overview of Assessment and Case Formulation -- Assessing Criminal Risk Domains: Guidelines for the Assessment Interview -- 6. Case Formulation -- Formulating Judgments about Risk -- Identifying Treatment Targets -- Formulating a Treatment Plan -- Avoiding Bias in Case Formulation -- 7. Establishing Collaborative Goals and Focusing Conversations -- Evoking Motivation for Change in Criminal Risk Domains -- What Is Focusing? -- Strategies for Establishing Goals and Focusing Conversations -- What If I Can't Get Agreement on a Focus?.
Part IV. Detailed Treatment Plans for Criminogenic Thinking and Antisocial Orientation -- 8. Connecting Criminogenic Thinking to Decision Making in Criminal Risk Domains -- Cognitive versus Behavioral Components of Criminal Risk Domains -- Levels of Criminogenic Thinking -- Connecting Criminogenic Thoughts and Decisions within Criminal Risk Domains -- Connecting Criminogenic Thinking Patterns and Decisions across Criminal Risk Domains -- 9. Monitoring and Restructuring Criminogenic Thinking -- Monitoring -- Restructuring -- Part V. Detailed Treatment Plans for Harmful Lifestyle Patterns -- 10. Developing New Routines: Leisure Activities and Employment/Education -- Leisure Activities -- Employment and Education -- 11. Restructuring Relationships: Friends and Family -- Altering Close Friendships -- Changing Family Dynamics -- 12. Managing Destructive Habits: Substance Use and Anger Reactions -- Changing Substance Use Patterns -- Managing Anger -- Part VI. Practice Management -- 13. Documentation and Report Writing -- Tips for Writing an Effective Assessment and Treatment Plan Report -- A Template for an Assessment and Treatment Plan Report -- Providing Feedback to JICs on Their Clinical Data -- Monitoring and Documenting Clinical Progress within Sessions -- A Template for a Treatment Summary Report -- Postscript -- Appendix A. Standardized Test Recommendations -- Appendix B. Resources for Practitioners -- Books -- Professional Organizations -- References -- Index.
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Cover -- Half Title Page -- Series Page -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Epigraph -- About the Authors -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- List of Figures, Tables, Scripts, and Forms -- Part I. Forensic Basics -- 1. The Forensic Treatment Landscape -- What Is Working with JICs Like? -- Community versus Custody: Different Settings and Challenges -- Justice Involvement: The Scope of the Problem -- What Works in Reducing Criminal Behavior? -- Is Diagnosis Important? -- A General Treatment Plan -- What Do Sessions Look Like? -- Realistic Expectations -- 2. An Integrated Forensic Cognitive‑Behavioral Therapy Approach -- Focusing on Criminal Risk Domains -- Addressing Thinking Patterns That Promote Criminality -- Enhancing Motivation for Change -- Clarifying Values and Life Priorities -- Part II. Engagement -- 3. Successfully Engaging Justice‑Involved Clients -- Motivational Interviewing and OARS Skills -- Engaging: Tips for the Initial Session -- Putting It into Practice -- 4. Clarifying Values and Life Priorities -- Why Work on Values with JICs? -- Distinguishing Values from Goals -- Identifying and Discussing Values -- Discussing Discrepancy versus Consistency between Values and Decisions -- Part III. Assessment, Case Formulation, and Focus -- 5. Assessing Criminal Risk Domains -- Overview of Assessment and Case Formulation -- Assessing Criminal Risk Domains: Guidelines for the Assessment Interview -- 6. Case Formulation -- Formulating Judgments about Risk -- Identifying Treatment Targets -- Formulating a Treatment Plan -- Avoiding Bias in Case Formulation -- 7. Establishing Collaborative Goals and Focusing Conversations -- Evoking Motivation for Change in Criminal Risk Domains -- What Is Focusing? -- Strategies for Establishing Goals and Focusing Conversations -- What If I Can't Get Agreement on a Focus?.

Part IV. Detailed Treatment Plans for Criminogenic Thinking and Antisocial Orientation -- 8. Connecting Criminogenic Thinking to Decision Making in Criminal Risk Domains -- Cognitive versus Behavioral Components of Criminal Risk Domains -- Levels of Criminogenic Thinking -- Connecting Criminogenic Thoughts and Decisions within Criminal Risk Domains -- Connecting Criminogenic Thinking Patterns and Decisions across Criminal Risk Domains -- 9. Monitoring and Restructuring Criminogenic Thinking -- Monitoring -- Restructuring -- Part V. Detailed Treatment Plans for Harmful Lifestyle Patterns -- 10. Developing New Routines: Leisure Activities and Employment/Education -- Leisure Activities -- Employment and Education -- 11. Restructuring Relationships: Friends and Family -- Altering Close Friendships -- Changing Family Dynamics -- 12. Managing Destructive Habits: Substance Use and Anger Reactions -- Changing Substance Use Patterns -- Managing Anger -- Part VI. Practice Management -- 13. Documentation and Report Writing -- Tips for Writing an Effective Assessment and Treatment Plan Report -- A Template for an Assessment and Treatment Plan Report -- Providing Feedback to JICs on Their Clinical Data -- Monitoring and Documenting Clinical Progress within Sessions -- A Template for a Treatment Summary Report -- Postscript -- Appendix A. Standardized Test Recommendations -- Appendix B. Resources for Practitioners -- Books -- Professional Organizations -- References -- Index.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Raymond Chip Tafrate, PhD, a clinical psychologist, is Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Central Connecticut State University. He co-chairs the Forensic Issues and Externalizing Behaviors special interest group for the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, is a Fellow and Supervisor at the Albert Ellis Institute in New York City, and is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers. Dr. Tafrate frequently consults with criminal justice agencies regarding difficult-to-change problems such as anger dysregulation and criminal behavior. He has presented his research throughout North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia, and has published numerous journal articles, book chapters, and books.

Damon Mitchell, PhD, a clinical psychologist, is Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Central Connecticut State University. As a criminal justice consultant, Dr. Mitchell has developed and delivered training workshops related to forensic assessment and treatment and has conducted evaluations of criminal justice programs. He has published numerous journal articles and book chapters as well as a coedited book.

David J. Simourd, PhD, CPsych, is in private practice in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, and has been involved in forensic psychological assessment and treatment since 1992. In addition to his clinical work, Dr. Simourd has published articles, delivered training workshops, and served as a consultant on offender assessment and treatment to a variety of correctional organizations throughout North America, Asia, and the Caribbean. He is on the editorial board of Criminal Justice and Behavior and is a member of the Ontario Review Board, the civil commitment board for mentally disordered offenders in Ontario.

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