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Relative Justice : Cultural Diversity, Free Will, and Moral Responsibility.

By: Sommers, Tamler.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2012Copyright date: ©2012Description: 1 online resource (141 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400840250.Subject(s): Responsibility -- Cross-cultural studies.;Skepticism.;EthicsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Relative Justice : Cultural Diversity, Free Will, and Moral ResponsibilityDDC classification: 170/.42 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Dedication -- contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- Part I: Metaskepticism about Moral Responsibility -- Chapter One: The Appeal to Intuition -- Chapter Two: Moral Responsibility and the Culture of Honor -- Chapter Three: Shame Cultures, Collectivist Societies, Original Sin, and Pharaoh's Hardened Heart -- Chapter Four: Can the Variation Be Explained Away? -- Part II: The Implications of Metaskepticism -- Chapter Five: Where Do We Go from Here? -- Chapter Six: A Metaskeptical Analysis of Libertarianism and Compatibilism -- Chapter Seven: A Very Tentative Metaskeptical Endorsement of Eliminativism about Moral Responsibility -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: When can we be morally responsible for our behavior? Is it fair to blame people for actions that are determined by heredity and environment? Can we be responsible for the actions of relatives or members of our community? In this provocative book, Tamler Sommers concludes that there are no objectively correct answers to these questions. Drawing on research in anthropology, psychology, and a host of other disciplines, Sommers argues that cross-cultural variation raises serious problems for theories that propose universally applicable conditions for moral responsibility. He then develops a new way of thinking about responsibility that takes cultural diversity into account. Relative Justice is a novel and accessible contribution to the ancient debate over free will and moral responsibility. Sommers provides a thorough examination of the methodology employed by contemporary philosophers in the debate and a challenge to Western assumptions about individual autonomy and its connection to moral desert.
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BJ1451 -- .S67 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=802237 Available EBC802237

Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Dedication -- contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- Part I: Metaskepticism about Moral Responsibility -- Chapter One: The Appeal to Intuition -- Chapter Two: Moral Responsibility and the Culture of Honor -- Chapter Three: Shame Cultures, Collectivist Societies, Original Sin, and Pharaoh's Hardened Heart -- Chapter Four: Can the Variation Be Explained Away? -- Part II: The Implications of Metaskepticism -- Chapter Five: Where Do We Go from Here? -- Chapter Six: A Metaskeptical Analysis of Libertarianism and Compatibilism -- Chapter Seven: A Very Tentative Metaskeptical Endorsement of Eliminativism about Moral Responsibility -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

When can we be morally responsible for our behavior? Is it fair to blame people for actions that are determined by heredity and environment? Can we be responsible for the actions of relatives or members of our community? In this provocative book, Tamler Sommers concludes that there are no objectively correct answers to these questions. Drawing on research in anthropology, psychology, and a host of other disciplines, Sommers argues that cross-cultural variation raises serious problems for theories that propose universally applicable conditions for moral responsibility. He then develops a new way of thinking about responsibility that takes cultural diversity into account. Relative Justice is a novel and accessible contribution to the ancient debate over free will and moral responsibility. Sommers provides a thorough examination of the methodology employed by contemporary philosophers in the debate and a challenge to Western assumptions about individual autonomy and its connection to moral desert.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

As Sommers (Univ. of Houston) argues, compatibilist and incompatibilist theories of moral responsibility derive their justification from moral intuitions that are taken to be universal. In contrast, Sommers rejects the appeal to universal intuitions and advances a "metaskepticism" about responsibility. Taking cues from contemporary moral psychology, he uses the first half of his book to argue that intuitions about responsibility vary wildly across cultures. Sommers delves into the shame and honor-based intuitions that prevail in collectivist societies, and contrasts these with the emphasis on individual accountability found in institutionalized (i.e., Western) cultures. In turn, these varying intuitions lead to culturally relative theories of moral responsibility. But make no mistake: Sommers is not arguing for relativism about moral facts. His is a meta-ethical project, and he uses the remainder of the book to discuss the implications of metaskepticism for compatibilist, libertarian, and eliminativist theories of autonomy and moral desert. Though Sommers tentatively endorses a form of eliminativism about moral responsibility, he leaves the door open for future discussion. Overall, this is a keenly argued yet surprisingly accessible book that presents a provocative thesis that should not be ignored. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through researchers/faculty. L. A. Wilkinson University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Tamler Sommers is assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Houston. He is the author of A Very Bad Wizard: Morality Behind the Curtain , a collection of interviews with philosophers and scientists. He has published numerous articles in scholarly journals and is a frequent contributor to the Times Literary Supplement and the Believer .

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