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Slavery and politics : Brazil and Cuba, 1790-1850 / Rafael Marquese, Tâmis Peixoto Parron, Márcia Regina Berbel ; translated by Leonardo Marques.

By: Berbel, Márcia Regina [author.].
Contributor(s): Marquese, Rafael de Bivar, 1972- [author.] | Parron, Tâmis [author.] | Marques, Leonardo [translator.] | Berbel, Márcia Regina. Escravidão e política : Brasil e Cuba, c. 1790-1850.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Albuquerque, NM , University of New Mexico Press ; 2016Description: v, 362 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780826356475; 0826356478; 9780826356482; 0826356486.Uniform titles: Escravidão e política. English Subject(s): 1800-1899 | Slavery -- Brazil -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Cuba -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Government policy -- Brazil | Slavery -- Government policy -- Cuba | Politics and government | Slavery | Slavery -- Government policy | Politik | Sklaverei | Brazil -- Politics and government -- 19th century | Cuba -- Politics and government -- 19th century | Brazil | Cuba | Brasilien | KubaGenre/Form: History.DDC classification: 306.3/62098109034
Contents:
Introduction. Brazil and Cuba: a shared history -- 1. Brazil, Cuba, and the first two Atlantic systems -- 2. The crisis of the Iberian Atlantic system and slavery in the constitutional experiences of Cádiz, Madrid, Lisbon, and Rio de Janeiro, 1790-1824 -- 3. Slavery and parliamentary politics in the empire of Brazil and in the Spanish empire, 1825-1837 -- 4. The politics of slavery in the constitutional empires, 1837-1850 -- Epilogue. Brazil and Cuba in the third Atlantic.
Summary: "The politics of slavery and slave trade in nineteenth-century Cuba and Brazil is the subject of this acclaimed study, first published in Brazil in 2010 and now available for the first time in English. Cubans and Brazilians were geographically separate from each other, but they faced common global challenges that unified the way they re-created their slave systems between 1790 and 1850 on a basis completely departed from centuries-old colonial slavery. Here the authors examine the early arguments and strategies in favor of slavery and the slave trade and show how they were affected by the expansion of the global market for tropical goods, the American Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, the collapse of Iberian monarchies, British abolitionism, and the international pressure opposing the transatlantic slave trade. This comprehensive survey contributes to the comparative history of slavery, placing the subject in a global context rather than simply comparing the two societies as isolated units."--Publisher's website.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HT1126 .B4513 2016 (Browse shelf) Checked out 10/05/2019 0000002246619

Translation of: Escravidão e política : Brasil e Cuba, c. 1790-1850 / Márcia Berbel, Rafael Marquese, Tâmis Parron.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 313-350) and index.

Introduction. Brazil and Cuba: a shared history -- 1. Brazil, Cuba, and the first two Atlantic systems -- 2. The crisis of the Iberian Atlantic system and slavery in the constitutional experiences of Cádiz, Madrid, Lisbon, and Rio de Janeiro, 1790-1824 -- 3. Slavery and parliamentary politics in the empire of Brazil and in the Spanish empire, 1825-1837 -- 4. The politics of slavery in the constitutional empires, 1837-1850 -- Epilogue. Brazil and Cuba in the third Atlantic.

"The politics of slavery and slave trade in nineteenth-century Cuba and Brazil is the subject of this acclaimed study, first published in Brazil in 2010 and now available for the first time in English. Cubans and Brazilians were geographically separate from each other, but they faced common global challenges that unified the way they re-created their slave systems between 1790 and 1850 on a basis completely departed from centuries-old colonial slavery. Here the authors examine the early arguments and strategies in favor of slavery and the slave trade and show how they were affected by the expansion of the global market for tropical goods, the American Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, the collapse of Iberian monarchies, British abolitionism, and the international pressure opposing the transatlantic slave trade. This comprehensive survey contributes to the comparative history of slavery, placing the subject in a global context rather than simply comparing the two societies as isolated units."--Publisher's website.

Translated from the Portuguese.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This team of coauthors, all Brazilian historians affiliated with the Univ. de São Paulo, has produced a sweeping, erudite survey of Atlantic slavery and European colonialism. They present Anglophone audiences with the vast body of literature published in Portuguese (and, to a lesser extent, in Spanish) on these subjects placed in conversation with works published in English. Broadly synthetic and heavily historiographic throughout, this book builds on more than 80 years of work by international scholars from across the Americas who have tried to comprehend both the diversity and the unity of the practice of slavery throughout the Atlantic world and the societies and polities that grew up around it. Taking a creative approach to comparative economic, political, and legal history, the authors explore the shared yet contrasting trajectories of Cuba and Brazil. They emphatically place African slavery--pro-slavery politics in particular--at the center of both the colonial enterprise and the postcolonial state in both places, showing convincingly that the 19th-century liberal state was not created in opposition to captive labor but in fact was crucially built upon it. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Amy Chazkel, City University of New York, Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center

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