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Dilemmas of difference : indigenous women and the limits of postcolonial development policy / Sarah A. Radcliffe.

By: Radcliffe, Sarah A [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Durham , Duke University Press ; 2015Description: xii, 372 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780822359784; 0822359782; 9780822360100; 0822360101; 9780822375029; 0822375028.Subject(s): Women in development -- Political aspects -- Ecuador | Indigenous women -- Ecuador -- Economic conditions | Indigenous women -- Ecuador -- Social conditions | EcuadorDDC classification: 305.4209866
Contents:
Postcolonial intersectionality and the colonial present -- The daily grind : ethnic topographies of labor, racism, and abandonment -- Interlude I -- Crumbs from the table : participation, organization, and indigenous women -- Politics, statistics, and affect : "indigenous woman in development" policy -- Interlude II -- Women, biopolitics, and interculturalism : ethnic politics and gendered contradictions -- From development to citizenship : rights, voice, and citizenship practices -- Postcolonial heterogeneity : Sumak Kawsay and decolonizing social difference.
Summary: Radcliffe explores the relationship of rural indigenous women in Ecuador to the development policies and actors that are ostensibly there to help ameliorate social and economic inequality. Radcliffe finds that development policies's inability to recognize and reckon with the legacies of colonialism reinforces long-standing social hierarchies, thereby reproducing the very poverty and disempowerment they are there to solve. This ineffectiveness results from failures to acknowledge the local population's diversity and a lack of accounting for the complex intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and geography. As a result, projects often fail to match beneficiaries' needs, certain groups are made invisible, and indigenous women become excluded from positions of authority. Drawing from a mix of ethnographic fieldwork and postcolonial and social theory, Radcliffe centers the perspectives of indigenous women to show how they craft practices and epistemologies that critique ineffective development methods, inform their political agendas, and shape their strategic interventions in public policy debates.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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HQ1240.5.E2 R34 2015 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002246791

Includes bibliographical references (pages 329-358) and index.

Postcolonial intersectionality and the colonial present -- The daily grind : ethnic topographies of labor, racism, and abandonment -- Interlude I -- Crumbs from the table : participation, organization, and indigenous women -- Politics, statistics, and affect : "indigenous woman in development" policy -- Interlude II -- Women, biopolitics, and interculturalism : ethnic politics and gendered contradictions -- From development to citizenship : rights, voice, and citizenship practices -- Postcolonial heterogeneity : Sumak Kawsay and decolonizing social difference.

Radcliffe explores the relationship of rural indigenous women in Ecuador to the development policies and actors that are ostensibly there to help ameliorate social and economic inequality. Radcliffe finds that development policies's inability to recognize and reckon with the legacies of colonialism reinforces long-standing social hierarchies, thereby reproducing the very poverty and disempowerment they are there to solve. This ineffectiveness results from failures to acknowledge the local population's diversity and a lack of accounting for the complex intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and geography. As a result, projects often fail to match beneficiaries' needs, certain groups are made invisible, and indigenous women become excluded from positions of authority. Drawing from a mix of ethnographic fieldwork and postcolonial and social theory, Radcliffe centers the perspectives of indigenous women to show how they craft practices and epistemologies that critique ineffective development methods, inform their political agendas, and shape their strategic interventions in public policy debates.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Radcliffe (Latin American geography, Cambridge) rethinks Ecuadorian Indigenous women's relationships to development by examining both the central highland province of Chimborazo and the Tsáchila community along the coast. Development projects, she asserts, have focused around single dimensions of social difference (gender, race, or poverty), whereas Indigenous women's problems and needs are complex based on their intersectional position relative to all of these categories. In fact, the single-dimension focus of past development policies reinforced the very colonial and postcolonial social hierarchies that development leaders sought to remedy. Moreover, development programs wrongly assumed homogeneity rather than diversity of experience among Indigenous women. By examining varied issues, including participatory democracy, programs for female leadership, and reproductive health, Radcliffe reveals how Indigenous women took advantage of the spaces open to them in order to cultivate their own voices and critiques of development as a whole. Indigenous women simultaneously pursue gender equality, economic rights, and equal treatment to mestizos. In short, they seek to thrive as active agents in their communities, the economy, and the nation rather than survive as recipients of aid. Radcliffe's book, well grounded in theory and research, is an important read for scholars of Latin American development and gender. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Scholars and graduate students. --Erin E. O'Connor, Bridgewater State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sarah A. Radcliffe is Professor of Latin American Geography at the University of Cambridge and coauthor of Indigenous Development in the Andes: Culture, Power, and Transnationalism , also published by Duke University Press.

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