In this body : Kaqchikel Maya and the grounding of spirit / Servando Z. Hinojosa.

By: Hinojosa, Servando Z, 1968- [author.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: Albuquerque, NM , University of New Mexico Press ; 2015Description: xxi, 249 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780826335234; 0826335233Subject(s): Cakchikel Indians -- Guatemala -- Comalapa -- Social life and customs | Cakchikel Indians -- Guatemala -- Comalapa -- Religion | Human body -- Social aspects -- Guatemala -- Comalapa | Human body -- Guatemala -- Comalapa -- Religious aspects | Mind and body -- Guatemala -- Comalapa | Midwifery -- Guatemala -- Comalapa | Mental healing -- Guatemala -- Comalapa | Indian dance -- Guatemala -- Comalapa | Community life -- Guatemala -- Comalapa | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Anthropology -- Cultural | RELIGION -- Comparative Religion | HISTORY -- Latin America -- Central America | Cakchikel Indians -- Religion | Cakchikel Indians -- Social life and customs | Community life | Human body -- Religious aspects | Human body -- Social aspects | Indian dance | Manners and customs | Mental healing | Midwifery | Mind and body | Mind-Body Therapies | Indians, Central American | Spiritual Therapies | Midwifery | Culture | Cakchiquel | Körper | Spiritualität | Comalapa (Guatemala) -- Social life and customs | Guatemala -- Comalapa | GuatemalaDDC classification: 972.81/61 LOC classification: F1465.2.C3 | H56 2015Other classification: SOC002010 | REL017000 | HIS007000
Contents:
Part One. Soul and Place in Mesoamerica. Approaching Soul in Mesoamerica -- The Human Landscape in Comalapa -- Embodying Spirit in Comalapa -- Part Two: The Midwife and Spiritual Gestation. The Midwife at Work -- Birth Organs and the Stirring of Will -- Knowledge about the Soul and the Child's Fate -- Part Three. The Soul-Therapist and Securing of Spirit. Soul-Therapists and their Beginnings -- Elusive Spirits and Surrogate Bodies -- Part Four. Maya Dancers and Renewal of Spirit. Performing Soul, Performing Community -- The Las Delicias Becoming -- The Moros in Public and Private Space -- Appendix: Origins of the Community.
Scope and content: "The Kaqchikel Maya, who live in the highlands of central Guatemala, experience soul as part of a continuum of bodily states. This account of life in one highland Maya community shows how, among Kaqchikels, spirit expresses itself fundamentally through the body, and not as something entirely separate from the body. By examining the lived-meanings of midwifery, soul therapy, and community dance in the town of San Juan Comalapa, the book identifies the body as the primary vehicle for spiritual grounding in daily life. Hinojosa invites readers to understand how specialists in these activities articulate their knowledge of the spirit through their understanding of blood, and he encourages readers to glimpse the hidden life of the body and how bodily processes guide local understandings of spirit at the personal and group level. This work further illuminates the agentive role of the body in Maya spiritual experience and enriches the current discussions of Maya spiritual revitalization"--
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F1465.2.C3 H56 2015 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002246775

Includes bibliographical references (pages 223-238) and index.

Part One. Soul and Place in Mesoamerica. Approaching Soul in Mesoamerica -- The Human Landscape in Comalapa -- Embodying Spirit in Comalapa -- Part Two: The Midwife and Spiritual Gestation. The Midwife at Work -- Birth Organs and the Stirring of Will -- Knowledge about the Soul and the Child's Fate -- Part Three. The Soul-Therapist and Securing of Spirit. Soul-Therapists and their Beginnings -- Elusive Spirits and Surrogate Bodies -- Part Four. Maya Dancers and Renewal of Spirit. Performing Soul, Performing Community -- The Las Delicias Becoming -- The Moros in Public and Private Space -- Appendix: Origins of the Community.

"The Kaqchikel Maya, who live in the highlands of central Guatemala, experience soul as part of a continuum of bodily states. This account of life in one highland Maya community shows how, among Kaqchikels, spirit expresses itself fundamentally through the body, and not as something entirely separate from the body. By examining the lived-meanings of midwifery, soul therapy, and community dance in the town of San Juan Comalapa, the book identifies the body as the primary vehicle for spiritual grounding in daily life. Hinojosa invites readers to understand how specialists in these activities articulate their knowledge of the spirit through their understanding of blood, and he encourages readers to glimpse the hidden life of the body and how bodily processes guide local understandings of spirit at the personal and group level. This work further illuminates the agentive role of the body in Maya spiritual experience and enriches the current discussions of Maya spiritual revitalization"--

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Maya beliefs about the nature of the soul animate their approach to birth, death, healing, the interpretation of dreams, the proper approach to using the natural environment, the symbolism found in public religious rituals, and much more. This is true not only of the Kaqchikel Maya, about whom anthropologist Hinojosa (Univ. of Texas, Rio Grande Valley) writes so eloquently in this book, but also in study after study of Indigenous peoples throughout Mexico and Central America. As Hinojosa notes for the Kaqchikel, complex, nuanced, and strange Indigenous understandings of soul, body, and spirit throughout Mesoamerica survived centuries of Christian missionizing if not largely intact, then at least in distinctively non-Christian form. Hinojosa focuses here on three realms of highland Maya life in which soul concepts are prominently displayed and discussed: midwifery and the guided entry of souls into bodies during gestation; healing involving the recovery and return to bodies of lost soul parts; and masked public dancing, in which human bodies and the spirits of local lords of forest, mountain, and water are joined in colorful, choreographed dance and music performances. A very welcome addition to the growing literature on Maya spirituality and cultural revival. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Paul R. Sullivan, independent scholar

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.